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Elon Musk

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behanceteam

Elon Musk

Elon Musk
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We often hear of the benefits of working less: our body is naturally wired to work in short bursts and when we give our mind room to breathe we generate new ideas and connections. We are not always measured by the widgets we can make, so does it make sense that our working hours are more inspired by the industrial age than the information age?

Every week we come across blog posts and essays from workers who have claimed to dramatically cut their hours. Metalab founder Andrew Wilkinson writes in Pando Daily about making the transition from working 80-hour days to less than 40:

Paradoxically, the more I let go, the more things seemed to take off. Short workdays forced me to focus on the important stuff instead of dicking around in my inbox, and I quickly learned to delegate the day-to-day. I started working smart instead of working hard.

Developer and entrepreneur Kyle Bragger wrote about a similar effect:

What did The Hustle™ accomplish? I gained weight. I wasn’t spending enough time with my (now) wife. I felt like shit. I began to resent my work, and the work I was producing clearly wasn’t my best. I started cutting corners. I went from a mindset of shipping with quality and integrity to “when is this going to be over?”

Nowadays, I’m working 4-day weeks, and doing no more than an hour or two of intense work at a time. I take a lot of walks. I’ve lost weight. I’m happier. My wife is happier. I’m more present. And most importantly:

I’m doing the best work of my life.

Yet we still come across other entrepreneurs or creatives that pride themselves as overworked. Not everyone who works long hours is a trail blazer. But it can seem like every trail blazer works long hours. A 2012 profile of Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk offers a glimpse into this mindset:

Freeing mankind from the scourge of carbon, not to mention its terrestrial shackles, has taken a toll on Musk’s personal life. In August he finalized his divorce from his second wife, the actress Talulah Riley. He’s had one vacation in four years. This summer he took his five boys—twins and triplets—to Maui with his family. “I think the time allocated to the businesses and the kids is going fine,” says Musk. “I would like to allocate more time to dating, though. I need to find a girlfriend. How much time does a woman want a week? Maybe 10 hours?”

To truly change the world do we need to put in vacation-less years like Musk? Or should we concentrate all of our work in 35-hour weeks like the developers above?

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TEDTalks

Entrepreneur Elon Musk is a man with many plans. The founder of PayPal, Tesla Motors and SpaceX sits down with TED curator Chris Anderson to share details about his visionary projects, which include a mass-marketed electric car, a solar energy leasing company and a fully reusable rocket.

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Superhero entrepreneur Elon Musk's SpaceX venture is working on something called the "Grasshopper Project," and the technology looks pretty impressive.

"We’ve begun testing reusability with something called the Grasshopper Project, which is a Falcon 9 first stage with landing gear that can take off and land vertically," Musk told Wired in October.

"The stages go to orbit, then the first stage turns around, restarts the engines, boosts back to the launch site, reorients, deploys landing gear, and lands vertically."

Today, Musk tweeted out a couple videos of the Grasshopper being tested on December 17 at the SpaceX rocket development facility in McGregor, Texas.

It's a big step toward rocket reusability, which Musk said will be a "fundamental breakthrough that needs to occur in rocketry." 

Watch the Grasshopper in action. It goes 40 meters up in the air, hovers for a bit, and then lands back on its feet:

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Join the conversation about this story »

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SpaceX Merlin 1D booster

Entrepreneur Elon Musk has made it his business to take on spaceflight, an alluring but sometimes painfully stagnant area of technology. After helping to found PayPal, he moved on to Tesla Motors and SpaceX, which recently made the first commercial supply mission to the ISS. Now, Wired's Chris Anderson — who is himself leaving Wired to focus on startup 3D Robotics — has interviewed Musk about his original plans for SpaceX, the process of building and launching his rockets, and the possibility of a truly reusable spacecraft, which Musk calls "the fundamental thing that’s necessary for humanity to become a space-faring civilization."

Musk isn't the only man with a plan for space travel, but his company has seen a level of success...

Continue reading…

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