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Fred Ritchin

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Original author: 
Fred Ritchin

What do we want from our media revolution? Not just where is it bringing us—but where do we want to go? When the pixels settle, where do we think we should be in relationship to media—as producers, subjects, viewers? Since all media inevitably change us, how do we want to be changed?

There used to be a time when one could show people a photograph and the image would have the weight of evidence—the “camera never lies.” Certainly photography always lied, but as a quotation from appearances it was something viewers counted on to reveal certain truths. The photographer’s role was pivotal, but constricted: for decades the mechanics of the photographic process were generally considered a guarantee of credibility more reliable than the photographer’s own authorship.

But this is no longer the case. The excessive use of photographs to “brand” an image (whether of oneself online, of celebrities, of products, of major companies, or of governments), and to illustrate preconceptions rather than to uncover what is there (presidents are made to look presidential, and poor people are generally depicted as victimized), as well as the extraordinary malleability of the photograph due to software such as Photoshop, make photography more of a rhetorical strategy, like words, rather than an automatic proof of anything. Photographs must now persuade, often in concert with other media, rather than rely on a routine perception that they inevitably record the way things are.

The billion or so people with camera-equipped cellphones, meanwhile, make photography, like all social media, an easily distributed exchange of information and opinions with few effective filters to help determine which are the most relevant and accurate. The professional photojournalist and documentarian, now a tiny minority of those regularly photographing, often are unsure not only how to reach audiences through the media haze, but also how to get their viewers to engage with the often extraordinarily important situations they witness and chronicle.

This moment of enormous transition forces a rethinking of what photography can do, and what we want it to accomplish. For example, if a young person wanted to become a war photographer, we have hundreds of books showing how others have photographed war. But what if a young person wanted, instead, to become a photographer of peace? The genre, unfortunately, does not yet exist.

Perhaps, then, we might want to begin focusing less on the spectacle of war and more on those impacted by the consequences of war—as Monica Haller has done, along with many others. The all-type cover of her book, Riley and His Story, disputes any conventional reading: “This is not a book. This is an invitation, a container for unstable images, a model for further action…. Riley was a friend in college and later served as a nurse at Abu Ghraib prison. This is a container for Riley’s digital pictures and fleeting traumatic memories. Images he could not fully secure or expel and entrusted to me…. This is not a book. It is an object of deployment.”

The collaboration is intended to help Riley Sharbonno resurrect buried memories and deal with some of what he went through in a war that destabilized his life. There are pictures that he does not remember taking of events that he does not remember witnessing. Photographs, once rediscovered, sometimes assuage his guilt, providing a reason for what has happened. Some of the grand half-truths about war are diluted. But there is anger, too: “I want you to see what this war did to Riley.”

Similarly, Jennifer Karady revisits the enduring trauma of violent conflict in her collaborations with soldiers, working for about a month with each one to re-stage calamitous situations in civilian life that they had experienced in war. Finding a discarded tire on the side of the road in Virginia evokes memories of a possible IED, for instance, or looking out of a window in upstate New York while protected by sandbags recalls a vulnerability to attack—each of these pictures is made with family members participating. Karady views the procedure as potentially therapeutic for those involved, while helping to make the legacy of war somewhat more comprehensible to family and friends stateside. And unlike the imagery from so many war photographers, her pictures are not at all glamorous.

Some are also using their photographs to make sure that the violence is not forgotten by the broader society. In her project “Reframing History,” Susan Meiselas returned to Nicaragua in 2004 with nineteen murals created from her own photographs made during that country’s Sandinista Revolution twenty-five years earlier. She placed the murals at the sites where the imagery was originally made, collaborating with local communities in visualizing their own collective memories and also helping to better acquaint Nicaraguan youth with their own past. (Imagine then if it were possible to place photographs from Robert Frank’s landmark book, The Americans, made in the 1950s, on billboards around this country where the photos were made—given the critical nature of many of his photographs, it would be an extraordinary way to gauge societal change, or the lack of it.)

And some are trying to share the vagaries of war as they occur in a sort of real-time family album. Basetrack, created by Teru Kuwayama and Balazs Gardi, was an experimental social-media project that consisted of a small team of embedded photographers primarily using iPhones, which focused upon about a thousand Marines in the 1st Battalion, Eighth Marines, during their deployment to southern Afghanistan in 2010–11. They curated a news feed alongside their own efforts, employed Google Maps as an interface, wrote posts in addition to photographing, all with a view “to connect[ing] a broader public to the longest war in U.S. history,” intent on involving their audience, many of them family members, in the discussion. Trying to establish transparency, they created an editing tool for the military to censor photographs and texts that might put soldiers in danger, and asked the military to supply reasons for the censorship, which were then made visible when a viewer placed the cursor over the blacked-out section.

It was a relatively effective system, until in 2011, when the Facebook discussion became too difficult for the military to handle and the photographers were “uninvited” a month before the troops’ deployment ended. Apparently a good deal of the content that military officials found problematic was about relatively minor matters, such as parents complaining that their sons and daughters had to wear brown and not white socks on patrol. Now only the Facebook page is still active, with curated news and continuing audience discussions. One mother’s response to the project: “It has truly saved me from a devastating depression and uncontrollable anxiety after my son deployed. Having this common ground with other moms helped me so much and gives me encouragement each day.”

And then there are others who, rather than wait for the apocalypse, are attempting to see what can be done to help prevent it. In James Balog’s long-term photography project, “Extreme Ice Survey,” cameras are positioned in remote arctic and alpine areas, automatically photographing the melting of the ice to help more precisely calculate the impact of global warming, and to create a visual record of a planet in crisis. According to the EIS website: “currently, 28 cameras are deployed at 13 glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, the Nepalese Himalaya, Alaska and the Rocky Mountains of the U.S. These cameras record changes in the glaciers every half hour, year-round during daylight, yielding approximately 8,000 frames per camera per year.”

Or, if we want to make sure that the opinions of the subjects photographed are better understood, why not at times show them their image on the back of the digital camera, and ask what they think of the ways in which they are depicted, and record their voices?  An even more collaborative exchange of perceptions is that between Swedish photographer Kent Klich and Beth R., a former prostitute and drug addict living in Copenhagen whom he began photographing in the 1980s. In the 2007 book Picture Imperfect, his photographs, along with case histories and images from Beth’s family album as a child, are paired with an enclosed DVD of Beth’s daily life for which she herself was the primary filmmaker.

Finally, when making pictures, maybe they can serve another, more practical function. For French artist JR’s 2008–2009 project, “28 Millimeters, Women Are Heroes,” photographs were not only used to document the faces of women living in modest dwellings in various countries, but in Kenya he began to make the oversize prints water-resistant so that when used as roof coverings the pictures themselves would help to protect the women’s fragile houses in the rainy season

Countless innovators, often working far from the spotlight, are today creating visual media that can be useful in a variety of ways. Rather than simply attempting to replicate previous photographic icons and strategies, these newer efforts are essential to revitalizing a medium that has lost much of its power to engage society on larger issues.

And then what is needed are people who can figure out effective and timely ways to curate the enormous numbers of images online from all sources—amateur and professional alike—so this imagery too can play a larger role. As badly as we need a reinvention of photography, we also will require an assertive metaphotography that contextualizes, authenticates, and makes sense of the riches within this highly visible but largely unexplored online archive.

Fred Ritchin is a professor at NYU and co-director of the Photography & Human Rights program at the Tisch School of the Arts. His newest book, Bending the Frame: Photojournalism, Documentary, and the Citizenwas published by Aperture in 2013.

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Original author: 
Megan Gibson

Many artists perceive power in movement. Photographer and visual artist Chris Levine seeks to illuminate the power inherent in stillness.

His larger-than-life subjects — which include Queen Elizabeth II and singer Grace Jones — might be among the most photographed people in the world, but Levine has a knack for capturing them at rest, as if in the calm of a storm. “Every opportunity I got [to shoot a portrait], I tried to distill it back to just pure essence without any suggestion or iconography or anything,” he told TIME during a recent visit to his studio in Oxfordshire, England, ahead of his solo retrospective show at The Fine Art Society on May 17. “I’m experimenting with that and trying to get stillness in the image.”

He says the challenge as a photographer is to distance himself from the idea of his subject  and focus on the person he has right in front of his lens. In a recent sitting with Kate Moss, Levine says he was determined to ignore Kate Moss, the supermodel, and instead tried “to bring her back, just to Kate – Kate, Kate, Kate.” In doing this, he manages to take one of the fashion world’s most recognizable faces and show it in a new light.

Which may explain why an artist who largely focuses on lights, lasers and holography — as Levine has done since his student days at London’s Chelsea School of Art; his light installations will be included in the retrospective at The Fine Art Society — has made a name for himself in recent years for his portraits. The Canadian-born Brit, now 41, says that he never expected to be shooting icons at this stage in his career. In fact, back in 2004, when he received a call from Buckingham Palace asking him to shoot a portrait of the Queen, Levine initially thought it was a prank. “I thought it was a hoax at first! Seriously, I really did. It just seemed so far-fetched.”

Once Levine was sufficiently convinced that it was not a ruse but a Royal request, he went to work preparing lights and equipment, wanting to put his knowledge of light and holography to use capturing the monarch in a truly modern fashion. Setting up the visual light equipment in Buckingham Palace took Levine about three days – “and it took every second,” he recalls – and the shoot itself took about an hour and a half. However, the resulting images, including Lightness of Being as well as the shot selected for TIME’s cover on the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012, are arresting and timeless.

“I think [these images] struck such a chord because it’s going somewhere into a more spiritual dimension and into a deeper realm,” he says. ”It’s what we are but people don’t very often connect with it.”

Chris Levine: Light 3.142 is on display from May 17 to June 15, 2013 at The Fine Art Society in London.

Chris Levine is a Canadian born light artist based in the United Kingdom.

Megan Gibson is a writer and reporter at the London bureau of TIME. Find her on Twitter at @MeganJGibson.

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TIME Photo Department

Many powerful photographs have been made in the aftermath of the devastating collapse of a garment factory on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh. But one photo, by Bangladeshi photographer Taslima Akhter, has emerged as the most heart wrenching, capturing an entire country’s grief in a single image.

Shahidul Alam, Bangladeshi photographer, writer and founder of Pathshala, the South Asian Institute of Photography, said of the photo: “This image, while deeply disturbing, is also hauntingly beautiful. An embrace in death, its tenderness rises above the rubble to touch us where we are most vulnerable. By making it personal, it refuses to let go. This is a photograph that will torment us in our dreams. Quietly it tells us. Never again.”

Akhter writes for LightBox about the photograph, which appears in this week’s TIME International alongside an essay by David Von Drehle.

I have been asked many questions about the photograph of the couple embracing in the aftermath of the collapse. I have tried desperately, but have yet to find any clues about them. I don’t know who they are or what their relationship is with each other.

I spent the entire day the building collapsed on the scene, watching as injured garment workers were being rescued from the rubble. I remember the frightened eyes of relatives — I was exhausted both mentally and physically. Around 2 a.m., I found a couple embracing each other in the rubble. The lower parts of their bodies were buried under the concrete. The blood from the eyes of the man ran like a tear. When I saw the couple, I couldn’t believe it. I felt like I knew them — they felt very close to me. I looked at who they were in their last moments as they stood together and tried to save each other — to save their beloved lives.

Every time I look back to this photo, I feel uncomfortable — it haunts me. It’s as if they are saying to me, we are not a number — not only cheap labor and cheap lives. We are human beings like you. Our life is precious like yours, and our dreams are precious too.

They are witnesses in this cruel history of workers being killed. The death toll is now more than 750. What a harsh situation we are in, where human beings are treated only as numbers.

This photo is haunting me all the time. If the people responsible don’t receive the highest level of punishment, we will see this type of tragedy again. There will be no relief from these horrific feelings. I’ve felt a tremendous pressure and pain over the past two weeks surrounded by dead bodies. As a witness to this cruelty, I feel the urge to share this pain with everyone. That’s why I want this photo to be seen.

Taslima Akhter is a Bangladeshi photographer and activist.

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Original author: 
Marco Bohr

As the old expression “a canary in a coal mine” suggests, the small songbirds have long been a symbol of a type of early-detection system — a way of indicating something that might otherwise remain unknown. And just as the old coal mine canaries alerted miners to invisible gases and fumes, the camera is capable of capturing moments that might pass unrevealed, or undiscovered. The striking pictures in Japanese artist Lieko Shiga’s series, Canary — currently on display at the Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam FOAM — references this powerful metaphor with images that are not immediately recognizable, nor easily understood, but that are nevertheless laden with meaning.

The Amsterdam show is comprised of an extensive body of work first published as a book in 2007 — a book that has since become something of a classic among photobook collectors. The majority of images in Canary are utterly fantastical, bordering on the surreal: a giant animal skull in a room lit by mysterious blue light; a fireball writhing in midair; a woman floating above the half-naked body of a man lying in bed. Elaborate and visually arresting dreamscapes, the pictures’ effectiveness is largely achieved through an intriguing interplay between light and color. However, much of the work is also manipulated: relying on analog technologies, some negatives appear scratched while other effects appear to have been produced in the darkroom. The extent of this manipulation varies. As Shiga points out: “I always try to approach the subject in its own way.” The photographer’s methods, in other words, are dictated by the subject of the image, and not the other way around.

Perhaps because most of the images in the Canary series were produced at night or in dark, interior spaces, the work at-once possesses and exudes an unsettling, ambiguous aura. The viewer’s sense of stumbling upon another’s intensely personal dreamscape is heightened even further in the photos where the identity of the subject is disguised.

In “Restaurant Surtaj,” for instance, the details of a restaurant interior recede before the eerie presence of a woman whose face is obscured by a ghostly black presence. The photograph has the palpable sense of a half-remembered dream. The dreamer struggles to give shape to a dream — perhaps even recalling the table number in a restaurant — but can not bring into focus the face of her dinner companion.

Shiga’s work is strongly reminiscent of the black and white photography of Masatoshi Naito. In his classic project, Tono-Monogatari, from 1983, Naito interrogates the complex relationship between mysticism, spirituality and Japanese folklore in a striking series of nocturnal landscapes and portraits. By manipulating the photographic negative or print, however, Shiga also points to the inherent vulnerability of the human body. If not suspended, as it were, in Shiga’s imagination, many of her subjects would fall, collapse or drown, simply as a consequence of the laws of physics.

The emphasis on the body perhaps relates to Shiga’s past experience as a dancer, which she practiced before teaching herself photography. Rather than depicting or documenting a recognizable physical world, however, Shiga instead employs photography as a means of choreographing an emotionally and psychologically complex inner landscape.

Lieko Shiga is a Japanese fine-art photographer.

Marco Bohr is a photographer and writer based in London. He maintains the Visual Culture blog.

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Feature and Essays 

First to Middle East…again….

Great series from Gaza by Andrew McConnell on Panos website…

Andrew McConnell: Leaving Gaza (Panos: September 2011)

Rena Effendi: Women of the Egyptian Revolution (Newsweek: September 2011)

David Levene: The Lives of Palestinians (Guardian: September 2011)

Moises Saman: Post-Gaddafi Tripoli (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Natan Dvir: Eighteen (TIME LB: September 2011) Arab Teens in Israel

Olga Kravets: The Shelter (Salt Images: September 2011)

Adam Ferguson: Afghanistan Soldiers Skyping (TIME LB: September 2011)

Graham Crouch: Red Cross Kabul (FotoStrada: 2011)

To other features…

Joseph Rodriguez: Welcome to Newburgh, Murder Capital of New York (New York Magazine: September 2011) article

Todd Heisler: Sound Stages in New York (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Sven Torfinn: In Uganda, Losing Land to Planted Trees (NYT: September 2011)

Thilde Jensen: Canaries (NYT: September 2011)

Gesche Würfel: Basement Sancturies (Foto8: September 2011) Würfel’s website

Lucy Nicholson: A Gay Military Family (Reuters: September 2011)

Tom Hyde: After the Fall (burn: September 2011)

From VII…

Anastasia Taylor-Lind in VII magazine…see later in this blog post for some VII transition related news…

Anastasia Taylor-Lind:  Resurgence of the Cossacks (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Ron Haviv: Glimpses of the Fall of Tripoli (VII: September 2011)

Mikolaj Nowacki: The River Odra (VII Mentor: September 2011) Nowacki’s website

I don’t remember if I posted this already earlier… quite possibly…Lynsey Addario’s NGM series on Baghdad on VII website…

Lynsey Addario: Baghdad (VII Network: September 2011)

Mads Nissen: Bessarabian Blues (Panos: September 2011)

Long 40 photo edit of Andrea Star-Reese’s Urban Cave…

Andrea Star-Reese: Urban Cave (Visionproject.org: 2011)

Maciej Dakowicz Cardiff nightlife photos were heavily discussed last week after being published in Daily Mail…Here the photos in NYT Lens…Comments in the Guardian and BBC

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff After Dark (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Myrto Papadopoulos: In the Grecian Caves Where Time Slows  Down (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Kosuke Okahara: Transnistria: An Unrecognized State Caught Between Past and Present (TIME LB: September 2011)

Max Whittaker: 80 on 80 (Prime Collective: September 2011)

David Walter Banks: Craziest Vacation Spots (Newsweek: September 2011)

Washington Post: Reframing Mexico (WP: September 2011) Reframing Mexico project website

John Vink: Cambodia Land Issues (Magnum: September 2011)

Finlay Mackay: London 2012 (TIME LB: September 2011)

Dan Giannopoulos: The Orphaned Elderly of Kathmandu (TIME LB: September 2011)

Peter Funch: Composite Characters (TIME LB: September 2011)

Brian Cassey: Soulless in Seoul (Fotostrada: 2011)

Paul Russell: Country Shows (BBC: September 2011)

“Your friend doesn’t have a fucking pool!” Alec Baldwin and other portraits by Jake Chessum…

Jake Chessum: Celebrity Portraits (Life.com: September 2011)

Agencies

VII Photo is going through some changes… British Journal of Photography’s news editor Olivier Laurent is keeping us up-to-date with news as they come in…So far, BJP has confirmed Stefano de Luigi will be full member, whereas VII Mentor Agnes Dherbeys has left VII to be an independent photographer. At the moment, Olivier has unconfirmed  list of photographers who have been offered  full membership with the agency and I’d imagine we’ll get the confirmations very soon…

BJP: VII Photo in transition (BJP: September 2011)

Stephen Mayes did imply in his comments that not everyone has been accepted, but it it would seen most of the Network photographers, such as Lynsey Addario, Ashley Gilbertson and Tomas van Houtryve,  have been made full members…No word on the future status of previous Network photographers Gafic, Kurzen, Domaniczky, Bouvet, or Bruce at the moment, or any of the VII Mentor photographers apart from Dherbeys…I’d imagine a lot of the Mentor photographers staying in that category, as it was only Network that’s gets disbanded…I have word that no new Mentor photographers were taken in at this time.

I can confirm that Anastasia Taylor-Lind, despite not being included in the BJP’s ‘unconfirmed list’ at time of writing this, has been offered full membership. Until now she was part of VII Mentor.

I was skyping with Anastasia earlier today, and asked about her initial reaction:

After 2 years on the VII mentor program under the guidance of Ron Haviv, I am utterly delighted and honored to become part of VII Photo. The mentor program is a wonderful and successful idea, and something I am really proud to have been part of. I’m excited about my future at VII and being part of an exceptional group of photographers, who are in turn supported by wonderful agency staff.”

Congratulations! Well deserved.  You can find Anastasia’s website here and blog with recent tear sheets here.

Speaking of VII…

Books

Fancy a look inside VII’s upcoming Questions Without Answers book? Yeah? Well, see here for sample pdf.

photo: Joachim Ladefoged from series, A Vanishing Way of Life, 2003

Slideshow in their archive

Should be a great book…. Would also love this…

The New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture 2011)

Afterwards: Contemporary Photography Confronting the Past (Thames&Hudson: 2011)

Communities

Emphas.is September 2011 newsletter

Videos

National Geographic: Search for the Afghan Girl Pt 1 |Pt 2 | Pt 3 | Pt 4

Interviews

Kathy Ryan on The New York Times Magazine Photographs book (spd.org: 2011)

Danfung Dennis : Hell and Back Again (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Alec Soth (The New York Times Magazine’s 6th Floor blog: September 2011)

Victoria Will trying to convince 35mm photographers to try out Hasselblad…tasteful advertising….(unlike)

Victoria Will (Hasselblad US: 2011)

Fred Ritchin : What Matters Now (La Lettre: September 2011)

Steve McCurry (Oprah)

Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols : National Geographic photographer ditches website, turns to the iPad (BJP: September 2011)

Olivia Arthur (IdeasTap)

Farzana Wahidy (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Elizabeth Hingley (e-photoreview: September 2011)

Erik De Castro : Back in Afghanistan, ten years later (Reuters photo blog: September 2011)

Nick Oza (Image Deconstructed: September 2011)

Articles

“Hard times have spawned great art — but not these hard times, it seems.”

LA Times: Where’s today’s Dorothea Lange? (LA Times: September 2011)

Guardian: The excess is not in alcohol but in Britain’s self-loathing  (Guardian: September 2011) Maciej Dakowicz’s pictures of Cardiff revellers are lapped up by a country that pictures itself as broken, boozing, morally sick

PhotoShelter blog has a piece about the most dangerous places to work as a photographer…

photo: Sebastian Meyer

PhotoShelter: The 14 Most Dangerous Locations For Photojournalists (PhotoShelter: September 2011)

NYT piece on AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus’ At War exhibition in Berlin…

NYT: At Berlin Show, One Photographer’s View of the Post-Sept. 11 World (NYT: September 2011)

Reportage by Getty Images:  “Hi, my name is Spain, and this is my story.”(Reportage: September 2011)

From Telegraph's Telephoto...

Telegraph: Afghanistan? There’s an app for that (Telegraph: September 2011) The humble iPhone is changing photography on the frontline

Telegraph: Revealing landscapes: the photography of Joel Sternfeld (Telegraph: September 2011)

BJP: Could Once Magazine, an iPad-only photography magazine, represent a new revenue stream for photojournalists? (BJP: September 2011)

BJP: Harry Ransom Center acquires Elliott Erwitt’s archives (BJP: September 2011)

BJP: Ways of Looking Bradford photography festival (BJP: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist, Mark Blinch (Guardian: September 2011)

Verve: Chelsea MacLachlan (Verve: September 2011)

PDN: Beatles Photographer Robert Whitaker Dies

PDN: Top 10 iPad photo portfolio Apps for the iPad

Bill Gates v. Photojournalists (Concertiumnews.com: 2011)

Seven by Five: Who is using your photos without permission?

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Application open for the inaugural Tim Hetherington grant

News and Documentary Emmys : Tim Hetherington’s and Sebastian Junger’s Restrepo won two Emmys (Outstanding Continuing Coverage of a News Story, Long Form, and an editing award for Outstanding Individual Achievement In A Craft)

Luis Valtuena International Humanitarian Photography award

New Scholarships Available For Photojournalists Returning To School : NPPA

Lucas Dolega Award

TIME is looking for the best young photographers of 2011…NB. Only US students need apply it seems

TIME : Next Generation : Submissions will be accepted beginning October 3, 2011, at 12 a.m. EST, until midnight on October 17, 2011. Winners will be announced on LightBox on October 26, 2011.

Jobs

Ben Curtis, Middle East photo editor for AP, named chief photographer for East Africa

Part time multimedia coordinator :  ActionAid : London

Fundraising

Human Right Watch: Facing Power: A Print Sale to Benefit Human Rights (HRW)

Events

Festival of Photography : Wild Day : Sunday 2 October 2011 : Royal Geographical Society : London | full program PDF

Services

Luxlab

To finish off…

Rude hand gestures of the world

If you are like me and not really into computer games, perhaps this ‘war journalism game’ Warco will get even us excited…or not…

Warco

and…

10 photo compliments

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Features and Essays

Tenth anniversary of the 9/11 is now passed us, but let’s start with some of the features related to it…Lot of good coverage on the New York Times’ web pages, obviously…First, Eugene Richards’ multimedia of his Stepping Through Ashes…

Eugene Richards: Stepping Through Ashes (NYT Lens: September 2011)

NYT Magazine slideshow ‘Images from a Post 9/11 World’..includes various photographers’ work… Benjamin Lowy, Lynsey Addario,Peter van Agtmael, Ashley Gilbertson, and others… also links to the articles, which their images originally illustrated…

After 9/11, National Guard and police patrols had become part of the commute at Grand Central Terminal. Security was increased further after the Madrid bombings. Related article: “Lesser Evils.”  photo: Antonin Kratochvil/VII

New York Times Magazine: Ten Years’ Time: Images from a Post 9/11 World (NYT Magazine: September 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson has some new work on the New York Times site also…

Ashley Gilbertson: Remembering Lost Loved Ones (NYT: September 2011)

Todd Heisler: The Moment Before, and After (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

Fred. R. Conrad: The Faces of a Towering Project (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Magnum: 9/11 and Aftermath (Magnum in Motion: September 2011)

Susan Meiselas: Ground Zero Artifacts and Construction (Magnum: September 2011)

Scott Goldsmith: Flight 93 and Shanksville, PA: The Forgotten Part of 9/11 (TIME LB: September 2011)

To other features…

Sanjit Das: East Africa Crisis (Panos: September 2011)

New work by last year’s Canon AFJ winner Bacigalupo, whose exhibition ‘My Name is Filda Adoch’ impressed a lot of people at Visa…

Martina Bacigalupo: Mogadishu, Somalia (Agence Vu: September 2011)

Patrick Brown: Bengal’s Burden (Panos: September 2011)

Espen Rasmussen’s In Transit project has now a dedicated website…

Espen Rasmussen: Transit (Project website: 2011)

Afghanistan…

Hipstas by Zalmai on Lens blog…

Zalmai: In Afghanistan, ‘Unbelievable Force of Life’ (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Norfolk on New Yorker Photo Booth…

Simon Norfolk: Postcard from Afghanistan : Echoes of Wars Past (New Yorker: September 2011)

Alixandra Fazzina: Pakistan: Preparing for disaster in south Punjab (Guardian: September 2011)

Mitch Dobrowner: The Storms (TIME Lightbox: September 2011)

Have another look at Medecins Sans Frontieres’ and VII Photo’s Starved for Attention campaign online… There’s a travelling exhibit going around the States this autumn…

photo: Marcus Bleasdale

MSF and VII Photo: Starved for Attention 

Andrea Bruce: Conservative Muslims in Russia (Washington Post: September 2011)

Christian Als: The Disappeared Generation (Panos: September 2011)

Moises Saman: Detained Sub-Saharan Africans in Libya (Magnum: September 2011)

Foreign Policy  have a three-part series online featuring Kate Brooks‘ work from Afghanistan, Iraq, Egypt, and Libya…The photos are taken from her new book

Kate Brooks: What War Looks Like (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: Those Who Face Death (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: From Revolution to War (FP: September 2011)

Johannes Eisele: The Casualties of War: Afghanistan’s Medevac Missions, Up Close (TIME LB: September 2011)

Stanley Greene: A Drop of Blood between Turkey and Syria (NOOR: 2011)

Kozyrev’s Tripoli photos now also on the NOOR site…

Yuri Kozyrev: The Battle for Tripoli (NOOR: September 2011)

Ruben Reyes: Foreign Laborers in Dubai (NYT Lens: September 2011) Reys’ website

Japan…

William Daniels and Espen Rasmussen: Six Months On (Panos: September 2011) Japan

Jake Price: Japan six months after tsunami (BBC: September 2011)

Ed Kashi: Eye Contact (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Laura El-Tantawy: The Veil (TIME LB: August 2011)

Edward Keating: Blue Highway (TIME LB: September 2011)

Anthony Suau: The 99ers (TIME: September 2011) Long-term unemployed in America

Mauricio Lima: Few Treatment Options for Afghans as Drug Use Rises (NYT: August 2011)

Jean Gaumy: Climate challenge : The Indonesian case (Magnum: September 2011)

David Trattles: Girl Boxers of Calcutta (Foto8: September 2011) Trattles’ website

Jessica Earnshaw: At a Bronx Hospital, a Teenage Milestone (NYT Lens: September 2011) Earnshaw’s website

Interviews

First some 9/11 anniversary related interviews…

Robert Clark : 9/11 (burn magazine: September 2011)

Lynsey Addario : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Samantha Appleton : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Joel Meyerowitz : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Meyerowitz interview also on TIME… looks like he’s working with Leica S2 here…

Joel Meyerowitz : Ground Zero, Then and Now (TIME: September 2011)

Eric Hoepker : 9/11 (CNN: September 2011) CNN’s Errol Barnett speak to photographer Thomas Hoepker who took one of the most controversial 9/11 images

Steve McCurry on 9/11…

Steve McCurry :  memories of 9/11 (Phaidon: September 2011)

Interesting thing I noticed the other day looking at some of McCurry’s 9/11 photos on his blog was that he has a frame almost exactly like one of Nachtwey’s… The two men must have stood pretty much side-by-side…The colours are different, but I presume it’s because Nachtwey was shooting C-41 and McCurry E-6…It’s fascinating how similarly the two photographers framed the scene…

Marco Grob : on the Making of Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience (TIME LB: September 2011)

Steve McCurry (Leica blog: September 2011)

Steve McCurry : Revealed – the true story behind the ‘Afghan Mona Lisa’ (Phaidon: September 2011)

Olivier Laurent’s excellent Yuri Kozyrev interview in British Journal of Photography…

Must read. Yuri Kozyrev : on covering revolutions in the Middle East (BJP: September 2011)

Kozyrev interview also on Lighbox…this about one of his Iraq War photos, one the most memorable and powerful images of the entire conflict by anyone I’d say…Couldn’t help but notice the file has been re-processed…

Yuri Kozyrev The Aftermath of 9/11: Ali Abbas (TIME LB: September 2011)

Fred Ritchin : Ritchin letter regarding the Q&A (Wired Raw File: September 2011)

Broomberg and Chanarin (ph-research.co.uk: 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen : Via Panam part 2 (Nikon blog: September 2011)

David Chancellor talks about ‘Hunters” (Polka: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Outposts (National Media Museum Vimeo: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Ways of Looking (National Media Museum: Vimeo 2011)

Martin Parr : Parrworld (Phaidon: 2011)

Nadav Kander (Conscientious: 2011)

Mario Tama : 9/11 (Dallas News: September 2011)

Jodi Bieber : Capturing Aisha (Montreal Mirror: September 2011)

Catalina Martin-Chico (BJP: August 2011)

Tyler Hicks : Gaddafi Family Album (NYT Lens: August 2011)

JR (The Atlantic: 2011)

Jared Soares (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Pete Brook (thoughtsonphotography: September 2011)

Articles

9/11 related articles… I particularly enjoyed reading and looking at this one from TIME Lightbox…

photo: Jonathan Torgovnik

TIME Lightbox: 9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (TIME LB: September 2011)

How magazines picked their 9/11 anniversary covers…

NYT: Magazine Covers on a Topic Known All Too Well (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

NPR: Sept. 11 Through The Eyes Of VII, Magnum And Life (NPR: September 2011)

Guardian: 9/11 anniversary: photographers recall day of horror (Guardian: September 2011)

New York Times: The Reckoning: America and the World a Decade After 9/11 (NYT: September 2011

Thomas Hoepker: I Took That 9/11 Photo (Slate: 2006) Photographer Thomas Hoepker on Frank Rich’s column, and why he thought his picture was too “confusing” to publish in 2001.

David Campbell: September 11, 2001: Imaging the real, struggling for meaning (DC blog: September 2011)

Alan Chin: Pushpins on a calendar (BagNewsNotes: September 2011)

Chris Floyd: The 9/11 Patriotic American Road Trip (Photographer’s Blog: September 2011)

Peta Pixel: How Photographers’ Rights Have Eroded Since September 11th (Peta Pixel: 2011)

Other articles…

photo: David Alan Harvey

Ideas Tap: Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 2 (Ideas Tap: September 2011)

UK Photographer’s Rights (Amateur Photographer: September 2011)

The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books…includes a shout-out to Luc Delahaye at Tate Modern..only three prints on show though (installation shot I took with my phone when I visited the show in August)…I enjoyed them…

Jenin Refugee Camp, 2001. Luc Delahaye.  From the exhibition New Documentary Forms at Tate Modern, London…worth a visit also for Mitch Epstein’s American Power…not so keen on the other three…

The Observer: The Month in Photography September 2011

NY Daily News: To honor slain photojournalist Tim Hetherington, fellow photog opens docu-film gallery in Bronx (NY Daily News: September 2011)

Reportage by Getty Images: Tom Stoddart shoots the ICRC  ’Health Care in Danger’ campaign

Photo Stories: Webdoc Favourites (photo-stories-org: 2011)

BJP: Photographers’ Gallery delays reopening until 2012

BJP: Photojournalism award launched in tribute to fallen photographer Lucas Dolega

BJP: Guillaume Herbaut and Bruno Masi win the Web Documentary Award at Visa Pour l’Image

Magnum: Steve McCurry Wins First Leica Hall Of Fame Award  (Magnum: 2011)

New Statesman:  The ambiguous art of Taryn Simon (New Statesman: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Oded Balilty (Guardian: August 2011)

Verve: Stuart Freedman (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Verve: Pete Marovich (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Pete Kiehart: Once: A New Magazine Model (Photo Brigade: September 2011)

BJP: Fujifilm commits to instant photography (BJP: September 2011)

Agency Access: Agency Access Acquires ADBASE and FoundFolios to Become Most Robust Photo Marketing and Illustrator Marketing Resource

10 Famous Street Photography Quotes You Must Know (Erik Kim Photography blog: September 2011)

Pulitzer-winning photojournalist resigns rather than lay off staff

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

UNICEF Pictures of the Year Award 2011 (link to PDF)

Five finalists for the inaugural Reminders Project Asian Photographers Grant

Tracy Baran Award : $5000 grant for an emerging US female photographer

Congrats to all this year’s Foam Magazine Talents…

photo: Ivor Prickett

Foam Magazine Talents 2011

Royal Photographic Society : Annual Awards 2011

Guardian Student Media Awards shortlisted

Click About It

Books

Kate Brooks: In The Light Of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey After 9/11

Conversations with Photographers (Conscientious)

Out November 1…

VII: Questions Without Answers 

Ken Jarecke: Husker Game Day – Farewell Big 12 

burn 02

The Family by Jocelyn Bain Hogg

Crowd Funding

Laura El-Tantawy just launched an Emphas.is crowd funding campaign to help her continue her work in Egypt…go and have a look…

Laura El-Tantawy: In the Shadow of the Pyramids (Emphas.is)

Agencies

VII September 2011 newsletter

Shell Shock Pictures

24Productions

Events

British Journal of Photography : ‘From stills to moving images’ at The Social on Monday 26 September, at Barrio Central, Poland Street, London W1F 8PS

Exhibitions

“If I don’t photograph it, it won’t become known.” Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus : At War : Berlin : 10 September – 4 December 2011

Chris Floyd: 140 Characters  : Host Gallery : 3 November – 17 November 2011 : press release

Photographers

Pamela Chen

Robert Nickelsberg

Patrick Smith

Diana Markosian

Conor O’Leary

Magda Rakita

Videos

Danfung Dennis’ film Hell and Back Again opening in US theaters on Oct 5…

Hell and Back Again Trailer

C.J Chivers, Andre Liohn: Lethal Lessons in Misurata (NYT: 2011)

Aperture education Youtube channel

Workshops

Magnum Photos workshop Munich, 10-14 Oct with Pellegrin, Dworzak & Anderson

Jobs

Open Society Institute : Exhibition Coordinator

Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University

To finish off…

I was reading Finnish magazine Kuukausiliite this morning which had an article about Google Street View along with some photos by artist Jon Rafman… Noticed one of the images was similar to one by Mishka Henner…Looks like Henner and Rafman have used the same Google Street View frame for these two…

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Paolo Pellegrin’s Libya Exodus work previously published in The New York Times Magazine, now on Magnum Photos website…the good news is, there are  loads more frames…24 instead of just 10…and based on quick check, the NYT Mag slideshow had some frames that aren’t on Magnum feature, so there’s actually more than 14 previously unseen shots in this…

His tilt is so recognisable, don’t you think?

Features and Essays - Paolo Pellegrin: Scenes from Libyan Exodus (Magnum Photos: March 2011)

Kozyrev’s Libya work now on Lightbox…Some of the strongest work I’ve seen come out of the country…

Features and Essays – Yuri Kozyrev: Dispatch from Libya (TIME Lightbox: March 2011)

Panos Pictures coverage….”Panos photographers William Daniels, Fredrik Naumann, Jeroen Oerlemans, Sven Torfinn and Mads Nissen have covered the ongoing crisis in and around Libya”…

Features and Essays - Various Photographers: The Battle of Libya (Panos: March 2011)

Features and Essays -  Thomas Dworzak: Postcard from Libya (New Yorker: March 2011)

Do also make sure to head over to Lightbox to see Christopher Morris’ updated Libya gallery

Photo; Anja Niedringhaus/Associated Press

Features and Essays – NYT: Battle of Libya (NYT: March 2011)

From Vanity Fair….Pellegrin’s ‘heir’ – at least when it comes to tilting – Moises Saman…

Features and Essays – Moises Saman: Inside Qaddafi’s Libya (VF: March 2011)

Interviews - Moises Saman (VF: March 2011)

Interviews - Goran Tomasevic (NYT Lens: March 2011) Thirty Days on the Ground in Libya: Goran Tomasevic’s Extraordinary Month, in Pictures

Interviews - John Moore (PBS: March 2011) Photographer Reflects on ‘Epic’ Libya Battles, Revolution in the Arab World

Articles – TIME: The Backstory: First Person: A Single Frame from the Conclusion of the Allied Air Strike on Libya by Anja Niedringhaus (TIME: March 2011)

Some talk over at David Campbell’s blog about lack of multimedia from some of the otherwise recently well covered countries…

Articles – David Campbell: Missing multimedia: where are the stories from Egypt, Japan, and Libya? (DC blog: March 2011)

Related…

Articles – Fred Ritchin: The Meta-Newspaper (After Photography blog: March 2011)

Guardian’s Ghaith Abdul-Ahad spent 2 weeks in 1 of Gadhafi’s dungeons (via @marcusbleasdale)

Articles -Ghaith Abdul-Ahad:  Inside Gaddafi’s brutal prison (Guardian: March 2011) While reporting the war in western Libya, award-winning Guardian correspondent Ghaith Abdul-Ahad was seized by Gaddafi’s militia. Here he describes two weeks inside the regime’s brutal prison system

Interviews - Q. Sakamaki on working in Cairo (The Villager: March 2011) “East Village photog survived Egypt beating, interrogations”

InterviewsJohn D McHugh on covering protests in Bahrain (BBC: March 2011)

Features and Essays – John Moore: Three Revolutions, One Photographer (Life.com: March 2011)

Mads Nissen’s World Press Photo prize winning series now on Panos website… Such a touching series..

Features and Essays – Mads Nissen: In the Name of Victoria (Panos: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Toshiki Senoue: The aftermath in Japan (FT Magazine: March 2011)

Features and Essays - NYT: Photos of Japan After Afterquake (NYT: March 2011)

Articles – Andrew Burton: Regarding Parachute Journalism (Photographer’s blog: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Justin Maxon: Transition to Spring (TIME LB: March 2011)

London saw huge protests against the government’s planned public service cuts yesterday. Nearly half a million people were reported to have attended the march through London and the rally in Hyde Park.

Guardian slideshow… some nice frames… don’t like the frame 7 though, with wide angle distortion…

Features and Essays – Guardian: Thousands march against spending cuts (Guardian: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Kadir van Lohuizen: Last Americans in Iraq (WP: March 2011)

AwardsThe Bayeux Calvados Awards for War Correspondents is calling for entries for its annual contest (BJP: March 2011)

Grants - Eugene Smith Fund : Deadline 31 May 2011

CompetitionsAOP Awards

Articles - BJP: BJP supports crowdfunding via Emphas.is (BJP: March 2011

Articles - Getty Images blog: Edwin Koo captures daily life in Pakistan’s Swat Valley (Getty blog: March 2011)

Articles – Reuters blog: Lucas Jackson: An arctic adventure (Reuters blog: March 2011)

Articles - Verve: Ben Roberts (Verve Photo: March 2011)

Articles - Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Jim Lo Scalzo (Guardian: March 2011)

! Blogs  - NYT Lens Blog:  Digital Subscription Plan Begins March 28

Interviews - Bruce Davidson (Walesonline.co.uk: March 2011)

InterviewsYvonne Venegas (BJP: March 2011)

Interviews - Amnon Gutman (e-photoreview: March 2011)

Events - Format Festival : Derby : ‘On the Concrete’ talk by Tom Wood : Venue: QUAD : 1 April : 18:30 – 20:30 : £10

EventsBJP and The Photographers’ Gallery’s social night is back at Barrio Central in London on Monday 28 March.

I noticed that The New York Times Magazine had an article about a young female football  player - or as NYT Mag called her, a soccer player – and the stills were taken by Ben Lowy and Nadav Kander… There was a video to go along the piece, shot by photographer Jason Arthurs…

PhotographersJason Arthurs

PhotographersLindsay Blatt

PhotographersDavid Ellison

Photographers - Kristian Leven

The good people at duckrabbit are organising a workshop in Devon (southwest of England)  in May….

Workshops - The Hinterlands Workshop by duckrabbit : 20-25 May 2011 : Devon, UK : “The Hinterlands photofilm workshop. It’s a chance to really get to grips with the art of photofilm production, whilst at the same time hanging out with some top people.” You can read about the workshop on BJP, here.

Movies - The Death of Kevin Carter

Prizes Tessa Bunney wins “Best Overall Portfolio Prize” at Format Festival (foto8: March 2011)

! Equipment - My London based friend Conor O’Leary is selling his Canon EF24-70/2.8L. He is asking £700. I know it’s in excellent condition. Should be a great deal. If you are interested, you can get in touch with Conor by emailing him at conor@conoroleary.com.

And an end note… The blog just passed 600,000 all-time views earlier this week. Nice to know people find my one-man operation useful. Thank you for visiting!

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Amazing piece of work!

Features and Essays – Jonas Bendiksen: The Big Melt: Asia’s Disappearing Glaciers (Magnum: July 2010)

Features and Essays – Alec Soth: California Treasure Hunt (NYT: July 2010) (via @LBMBooks)

Features and Essays – Michael Kamber: A Living Wage (NYT: July 2010) An American-owned factory in the Dominican Republic committed to pay a living wage

Features and Essays – Dominic Nahr: Bombings Show Support for al Qaeda (WSJ: July 2010)

Features and Essays – Lynsey Addario: A Death Ignites Violence in Kashmir (NYT: July 2010)

Ian Parry results are in… AwardsSebastian Liste wins the Ian Parry (BJP: July 2010)

Photographers – Espen Rasmussen has updated his website

I strongly recommend to watch the below Stephen Mayes interview. Plenty of food for thought.

Interviews - Stephen Mayes : Director of VII Photo Agency (Bulb by Gerald Holubowitz: July 2010)

I believe the book mentioned by Mayes in the interview is this: Fred Ritchin: After Photography (W.W. Norton and Co. : 2008)

InterviewsStanley Greene (PBS Tavis Smiley: July 2010)

Awards, Grants, and CompetitionsThe Silver Eye Center for Photography Fellowship 2010 : international photography competition : Deadine 27 August 2010

MJR…

Collectives - MJR : Weekly Collection 71 | MJR Film Grant Winners

multiMediaShorpy : Historic Photo Archive  …Shorpy is number 15 in TIME magazine Best Blogs of 2010 apparently…

Books - Jodi Bieber: Soweto (Jacana Media: 2010)

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