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Gillian Laub

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Sixty years ago my grandfather, Joe Laub, urged his dear friend Lee Morrone to open up a summer camp. An overnight camp for children with special needs – a remarkable proposition at a time when people didn’t so much care for but deal with such children, often hiding them away in institutions. Camp Lee Mar would be different.  And throughout the years, I was told stories about just how different. Today, children come from all over the United States, Canada, Europe and the Middle East for seven weeks every summer in Lackawaxen, Pa. Lee, they say, is a miracle worker.

Finally, two years ago, I went with my parents to visit Lee at camp.  I knew of the history and Lee’s vision; I grew up hearing the uplifting camp stories. But to be honest, I was afraid. I expected sadness – how could you feel anything else witnessing all the limitations of disabled children struggling in a setting known for fun and frivolity?

I remember we arrived in the early evening and Lee escorted us to the dining room, where the children were having dinner. You’ve never seen such well-behaved, mannered children! Lee pointed out a child who came to camp having never eaten with utensils of any kind, and there he was, happily eating with fork and knife in hand. Lee walked by each table to say hello, checking in as the kids greeted her with bright smiles and loving eyes. “Don’t chew with your mouth open,” she’d say. “Sit up straight.” Nearly every child came to camp with a resume of what they couldn’t do. Lee would quickly recount this resume, remembering the list of “don’ts” and “can’ts.” Then, she’d invariably point the child out and say, with this boundless pride, and just a hint of indignation, “And now look at them!” Sure enough, they’d be doing what others said they’d never be able to do.

This wasn’t a place of sadness; there was love and acceptance everywhere. This wasn’t a place of humiliation; every camper had a story of extraordinary achievement. The only limitations, I learned, were the expectations I had brought with me. Lee’s biggest miracle was the camp itself. And with Ari Segal, her co-director of twenty years, and a staff of devoted counselors, she has inspired a new generation of professionals dedicated to people with special needs.  When I learned that this year Camp Lee Mar would be celebrating its 60th anniversary (as well as Lee’s 85th birthday), I knew I wanted to document it. It’s not often, after all, that you get a chance to be so close to so much miracle-making.

Gillian Laub is a photographer based in New York and a frequent contributor to TIME. See more of her work here

For more information on Camp Lee Mar, visit LeeMar.com.

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For kids and communities across America, prom night is both an enduring rite of passage and a sign of the times. This April, TIME commissioned photographer Gillian Laub to document this ritual in a journey that would take her across the country to Georgia, Missouri, Arizona, Oregon, New York and Massachusetts. In the resulting photo essay, “Last Dance,” Laub captured the bittersweet anticipation and excitement surrounding the annual tradition through a series of striking portraits of teenage prom attendees.

“Last Dance” is, in many ways, the culmination of a 10-year project for the New York City based photographer. One of the schools that appears in the essay, Montgomery County High School in Mount Vernon, Ga., first appeared on Laub’s radar when she traveled there in 2002 to photograph its homecoming festivities, then segregated by race, on an assignment with SPIN magazine. Seven years later, she returned to photograph Montgomery County High School’s prom, still segregated by race, for a project that was published by the New York Times magazine.

That would be the last time Montgomery County High School held a segregated prom, and Laub returned again this April to photograph students getting ready for just the third integrated event in the school’s history. “Naturally the first prom I photographed for the TIME essay was Montgomery County High School,” Laub says. “I wanted to follow the only biracial couple attending the prom. Only three years earlier they wouldn’t have been allowed to be each other’s dates.”

The word “prom” first appeared in 1894 in the journal of an Amherst College student going to a prom at Smith College nearby. In the century since, prom has become a distinctly high school tradition, a last chance for classmates to party together, before post-graduation plans send them in different directions. Today, as Laub’s pictures show, getting ready for prom plays as big a role as the dance itself; it plays out to big business, too. A 2012 survey predicted families would spend an average of $1,078 on prom, including costs for outfits, hair, makeup and manicures. The Dwight-Englewood girls wearing haute designers like Alice Temperley and Roberto Cavalli almost certainly spent much more, while many students from Joplin High School in Joplin, Mo.—the site of a devastating tornado a little over a year ago—arrived at prom in donated attire.

Proms represent other rites of passage too. On May 19 in Massachusetts, the Boston Alliance of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth hosted its 32nd annual prom—the nation’s oldest for GLBT youth—10 days after Barack Obama became the first U.S. president to endorse gay marriage.

“I love the ritual, the time, effort and thought about every detail of preparation to put their best foot forward,” says Laub about documenting proms. “It’s a moment in their lives of transition and hope.” For the students, yes, and perhaps for their schools and communities, too.

See more about proms in this week’s issue of TIME and on TIME.com.

Gillian Laub is a photographer based in New York and a frequent contributor to TIME. See more of her work here

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“It changed my life,” my friend announced at dinner a few months ago. The “it” in question was a book, which she described as orgasmic. My interest was certainly piqued. In furtive late-night conversations and mid-day lunches over the next few months, the transformational qualities of the trilogy, Fifty Shades of Grey, by British author E.L. James, spread among the wives and mothers all over New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County. The series, which began as online fan faction before racking up hundreds of thousands of e-book downloads, are about an S&M relationship between a billionaire and a virginal young college student. What started across the Atlantic as one woman’s desire to bravely express her lurid desires, had created sensual upheaval—as well as an ad hoc community of empowered women bound by their shared discovery of pleasure—in the unlikeliest of places: the suburbs. And I just had to document it.

Gillian Laub

(L to R) Sima Leyy, Jen Boudin, Lyss Stern and Stacey Cooper together at a party celebrating the Fifty Shades series of books in Long Island, NY celebrating the Fifty Shades series of books by the author E.L. James.

In mid January, I attended a book party in New York City for James, who was literally overwhelmed to tears of joy (and alarm) by a pack of hundreds of middle-aged women acting like adolescent girls unleashed on Justin Bieber. “I’m completely and utterly stunned by the reaction to these books,” James would tell me, a few days later, at my apartment. All the women in attendance claimed the same of themselves: forever changed – and all for the good. “You need to read it. You need to do it now. And you need to wear panty-liner,” one woman’s friend warned. Another fan at the signing told James that she’d never had an orgasm before—and that at 43, she had her first one just reading it. It’s obvious that Fifty Shades of Grey has become a suburban literary virus of sorts. And James’ life—as well as the women readers she inspires—will henceforth never be the same.

Read More: James’ Bondage

Gillian Laub is a New-York-based photographer. See more of her work here.

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Features and Essays 

Egypt, Cairo, Tahrir….

Moises Saman has been kicking ass with his Cairo work…NYT front page pics on several occasions during the last two weeks…This is the slideshow a lot of people were talking about over the weekend…

Moises Saman: Cairo Undone (NYT) Cairo Undone on Magnum site.

Saman hit the front page also today (November 29) with an image  (to-me maybe not so obvious choice) seen below, which can be found online in the NYT’s Egypt Turmoil slideshow…featuring work by various photographers.

photo: Moises Saman

Below image ran on the front page of the International Herald Tribune last week….You can see it in black and white in this Saman’s tweet…The colour version is up on Magnum Photos site…

Moises Saman: Unrest in Cairo: Egypt’s Revolution Continues (Magnum)

Miguel Angel Sanchez: Egyptians (NYT Lens) Angel Sanchez’s website

Davide Monteleone: Egypt Waiting (VII)

Espen Rasmussen: Beyond Tahrir Square (Panos)

Guy Martin: The Egyptian Revolution (Panos)

Trevor Snapp: Revolution Round Two? (Global Post) Full edit on photographer’s archive

NB. See later in this post regarding the latest TIME cover on Egypt that ran on all markets except the US. Filed under Articles.

Tim Hetherington’s last images on Magnum Photos…

Credit: Tim Hetherington. LIBYA. Misurata. April 20, 2011. Tim’s last photograph.

Tim Hetherington: The Libya Negs (Magnum)

Occupy Wall Street…

Christopher Anderson: OWS (New York Magazine)

Noticed that Ashley Gilbertson’s OWS series shot in October had sadly disappeared from VII site, but the reason turned out to be that New Yorker had put him on assignment (here’s a pic of him working)…I’m sure the series will reappear on VII in the future, but for now we can enjoy an edit on Photo Booth…good news: it includes new frames, such as the below one,  shot this month…

Ashley Gilbertson: Occupy Wall Street (Photo Booth)

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Related to OWS issues I would say… Great series on American poverty by Joakim Eskildsen…

Joakim Eskildsen: Photographs of American Poverty (Lightbox)

From the other side of the American political spectrum…

Jason Andrew: Tea Party: Under the banners of American Flags  (Reportage)

DRC and elections…

Finbarr O’Reilly: Deadly Election Violence in Congo (Reuters)

Jonathan Torgovnik: Rebuilding DRC (Reportage)

Pierre Gonnord: Relatos (Lightbox)

Liz Hingley: Under Gods (Lightbox)

Gillian Laub: Turkey Day (Lightbox)

Paul Fusco: DGI  29 (Magnum in Motion)

Alixandra Fazzina: The Flowers of Afghanistan: First Sea (Photographer’s archive)

Pep Bonet: Microcredit Peru (NOOR)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Caspian (Foto8)

Saw and edit of this feature run in Time mag couple of weeks ago..

Xavier Zimbardo: Reconstruction of the Bolshoi Theatre (Reportage) Behind the scenes video with Xavier Zimbardo in French

Best of the year….

photo: Goran Tomasevic

Reuters : Best Photos of the Year 2011

photo: Lynsey Addario

VII – Best of 2011: Highlights of a Year in News   : VII photographers present their best images, shot or released in 2011

AFP: 2011 Pictures of the Year

Fan of David Cameron or not,these Tom Stoddart photos in Reportage Tumblr are worth seeing.Cameron by Stoddart for Sunday Times Magazine….

Tom Stoddart: David Cameron (Reportage Tumblr)

Andrew McConnell’s Gaza surfing series on Newsweek…Bummed I still haven’t received the first issue of my annual subscription… Would have loved to have seen this in print…

Andrew McConnell: Surf’s Up in Gaza (Newsweek)

McConnell from Gaza also, but very different…NGO piece…

Andrew McConnell: Regenerating Gaza (Guardian)

Japan…

Giulio Di Sturco: Awash in Wrackage :  Japan (PDNPhotoaDay)

Kishin Shinoyama: After the Storm: Post-Tsunami Japan (Lightbox)

Donald Weber: Life After Zero Hour (VII) Japan

Davide Monteleone: Dusha: Russian Soul (VII)

Stefano di Luigi: Hidden China (VII)

Massimo Berruti: Lashkars in Pakistan (Lightbox) The series in Le Monde

Annie Leibovitz:  Pilgrimage (NYT)

Luceo Images: Few and Far Between (NYT Lens)

Joao Pina: Tracing the Shadows of Operation Condor (NYT Lens)

Andew Testa: Mind the Masterpiece (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter Photos from the Skies Above Poland (NYT Lens)

Jared Moossy: Mourning in Mogadishu (Foreign Policy)

Sebastian Liste: Urban Quilombo (Reportage)

Teun Voeten: Narco Estado (Magnum Emergency Fund)

Nick Cobbing: The Solid Sea (Photographer’s website)

Harvey Wang: A World of Change on the Lower East Side (NYT)

Robb Hill: Rural Home Town (NYT Lens)

Suzanne Opton: Soldier Down: Portraits (Lightbox)

Kirill Nikitenko: Russian Portraits of Defiance (Newsweek) Nikitenko’s website

Brian Van Der Brug: In Prison and Dying (LA Times Framework photo blog)

Lourdes Jeannette: Blood Ties (Lightbox)

Caged animals.

Asmita Parelkar: Not-So-Wild-Kingdom (NYT Lens)

Stuffed animals.

Klaus Pichler: Behind the Scenes Photos of Natural History (NYT Lens)

Guillaume Herbaut: The Zone (Project website) Now in English

Guillermo Arias: Tijuana River City (zReportage)

Kate Holt: The Real Cost of War (zReportage)

Natalie Naccache Mourad: Madaneh Marriages (photographer’s website)

Marc Lester: Living with Breast Cancer (Anchorage Daily News)

Oli Scarff: Winners at the Poultry Club’s 2011 national show (Guardian)

 Interviews and Talks


David Douglas Duncan (Lightbox)

Seamus Murphy (Verve Photo)

David Alan Harvey (Develop photo Vimeo)

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #6 (Phaidon)

Giles Duley : Becoming the Story (Economist)

Jason Larkin (Frontline club)

Alissa Everett : Giving up finance for photojournalism (CNN)

Sebastian Liste pt.1 / pt.2 (Daylight Magazine)

Marco Grob : How I Got That Shot: The 3-Minute Portrait (PDN)

Is this Annie Leibovitz and Fuji X100?

Annie Leibovitz (NPR)

Annie Leibovitz ♥’s Her iPhone Camera (PDN)

Jodi Bieber talks about the reaction to her World Press Photo winning photograph on The Strand (BBC)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (The Broad’s Sheet)

Useful advice by Rachel Palmer…

Rachel Palmer : How to get a photography commission for an NGO (photographer’s/photo editor’s website)

Kate Peters (IdeasTap)

Eric White (MSNBC photo blog)

Lisa Pritchard : Ask an Agent 5 (LPA blog)

Liz Hingley : Turning point (NYT Lens)

BagNewsSalon webinar, “The Visual Politics of Occupy Wall Street.” :  4 December

Videos

BBC: The ‘genius’ of Tim Hetherington killed in war

Articles 

Time magazine does it again….’dummying-up’ (I might have just made up that word) the US edition I mean… My mate Tim Fadek has the TIME cover this week with a terrific image from Cairo in all markets expect the US….

Peek inside…This is how Tim’s two other photos ran…

Comment…

Business Insider: These Time Magazine Covers Explain Why Americans Know Nothing About The World

PDN: Israel Apologizes to Lynsey Addario

Saw Lynsey Addario ( @lynseyaddario) tweet a link to this Marie Claire piece on female photojournalists…Featuring Addario herself, Agnes Dherbeys, Erin Trieb, Stephanie Sinclair, and Andrea Bruce

photo: Stephanie Sinclair

Marie Claire: Female Photojournalists | “Once thought of as too frail for the job, five award-winning women photojournalists share their most vivd memories from the field — and the images they will never forget.”

Related…

NYT: Arrests and Attacks on Women Covering Protests in Cairo 

NYT: Software to Rate How Dratically Photos Are Retouched

PDN: Inside the Bestseller List: Top Photo Books of 2011

NYT: Shooting for Global Change (NYT Lens)

I was in Istanbul over the weekend, but sadly had no time to check out any of these exhibitions…

photo: Bruno Barbey

NYT: A Whirling Document of Turkish Culture

PDN: Cartier-Bresson Photo Sets Record at Christie’s Auction in Paris

Yahoo: Camera lost at sea returned with the help of social networking

TimeOut: Photography galleries in London

Dvafoto: Find Copyright Violations of Your Pictures With src-img Bookmarklet

A Photo Editor: Real World Estimates – Flat Rate Magazine Contracts

BJP: Editorial photographers hit by latest Getty Images cuts

BJP: Photographer Jean-Christian Bourcart wins the 2011 Prix Nadar for his book Camden

BJP: Celebrated printer Gene Nocon dies

Joerg Colberg: What Photographs Can and Cannot Do (Conscientious)

Guardian: Jodi Bieber’s Best Shot

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Tim Wimborne

Photoshelter Guide: Selling Stock Photography

Foto8: Book review – Ben Lowy: Iraq Perspectives

Related..

A Photo Editor: This Week In Photography Books

Looking into some  heavy duty camera ‘bags’… Saw Greg Funnell tweet this review he had done in 2008…

Greg Funnell: Gear Review : Think Tank Airport Security Vs Pelican Case 1510 (Photographer’s blog)

Verve Photo: Jake Price

Awards, Grants, and Competitions 

photo: Jan Grarup

Leica Oskar Barnack Award will be accepting entries from 16 January 

College Photographer of the Year : International picture story winning images & judges screencast are online

Rory Peck Awards Winners

FotoEvidence Book Award open for submissions

Photo Lucida Critical Mass 2011 Winners

FotoVisura Grant

LPA Student Challenges 

Crowd Funding

Emphas.is Crowdfunding photojournalism survey

Behind the smokescreen by Rocco Rorandelli (Emphas.is) featured on BJP

Grozny – Nine Cities by Kravets, Morina, Yushko (Emphas.is) project featured on NYT Lens in 2010

Agencies and Collectives

VII Newsletter

Panos Pictures newsletter

Statement Images submissions deadline extended

Jobs

Look3 : Exhibits Coordinator

Saw these on Twitter…

New Yorker : spring multimedia intern (students only) : Contact kristina_budelis[at]newyorker.com

Redux is in need of an intern in NYC office : Adobe Creative Suite skills is necessary:  send an email to submissions[at]reduxpictures.com with Internship in the subject line

Intern for Phaidon.com . Email features@phaidon.com with your CV

Desk Space

Roof Unit : London

Photographers 

Website relaunch…

Marcus Bleasdale

Benjamin Lowy : December 2011 Promo

Asmita Parelkar

Louis Quail

Caleb Ferguson

Marc Lester

Bruno Mancinelle

To finish off…

Very, very good Erroll Morris short… The Umbrella Man from NYT

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Features and Essays

Last week saw the tenth anniversary of the war in Afghanistan..

Most of you have probably already seen this…nevertheless….LightBox put up a gallery of 43 images by war photographers in Afghanistan and the images that moved them most….Lot of familiar frames by Anderson, Morris, Sinclair, Bronstein, Haviv, Murphy, van Agtmael, Nachtwey, etc…. you name it…Hadn’t seen this one by Emilio Morenatti before…

Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP. Afghanistan. October 4, 2004.

TIME Lightbox: Afghanistan: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (LightBox) Includes Michael Kamber  commenting on a  Tim Hetherington photo and Pancho Bernasconi commenting on a Chris Hondros photo

Just noticed Patrick Witty tweet that this week’s TIME International cover story is on Afghanistan..Cover photo by Adam Ferguson…My eyes were drawn to the headline that accompanies the image… “Why The US Will Never Save Afghanistan”…you compare that to the famous 2010 cover with Jodi Bieber’s Aisha portrait with the headline “What Happens if We Leave Afghanistan”,and I would argue there’s been a change in Afghanistan thinking at TIME’s editorial desk…see the covers side-by-side here.

Panos have a slideshow of Afghanistan images from the past ten years… Was looking at the below Martin Adler one from Kabul in 2002, and noticed the building looked familiar… realised it’s the same one as in a famous Simon Norfolk one from 2001… See the two side-by-side here

Photo: Martin Adler/Panos. Afghanistan. Kabul. 2002.

Panos Pictures (various photographers): 10 Years of War in Afghanistan (Panos)

Donovan Wylie: Capturing the Architecture of War Before It’s Gone (Lightbox)

Nice series on Lightbox by Gillian Laub from a Tel Aviv beach..Was surprised to see the credit didn’t mention Institute… Checked her website…Looks she’s no longer represented by them…

Gillian Laub: Tel Aviv Beach (TIME Lightbox)

Occupy Wall Street…

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Yunghi Kim: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Photographer’s website)

Life.com: Occupy Wall Street (Life) Photos by various photographers

Larry Fink: Occupy Wall Street in 1967 (New Yorker)

From Newsweek…First Donald Weber’s photos from Japan… See later in this post for info on Weber’s grant writing workshop…

Donald Weber: Japan: Life After Zero Hour (Newsweek) Fukushima

Lynsey Addario: Famine in Africa’s Horn (Newsweek)

Rafal Milach: Life in Putin’s Russia (Newsweek)

More Russia… this by new VII member Davide Monteleone…

Davide Monteleone: Russian Soul (Phaidon)

Tomas Munita: Chilean Miners (NYT)

Stuart Freedman: Delhi’s Army of Homeless (Panos)

Lauren Greenfield: Child Beauty Queens (Institute)

Lauren Greenfield: Boom to Bust in Ireland (Institute)

Peter diCampo: Ivory Coast (VII Magazine)

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul Cinemas (MSNBC)

Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers (TIME LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Kenya (Starved for Attention)

Damir Sagolj: Hunger in North Korea (NYT Lens)

Peter Beste: Norwegian Black Metal (New Yorker)

Robin Hammond: Condemned (Panos)

Seamus Murphy: Libya (VII)

Tom Hyde: After The Fall (Statement Images)

Richard Nicholson: The Last Of London’s Darkrooms (NPR)

Giorgos Moutafis: The Arab Spring Project (Foto8) Moutafis’ website 

Xavier Comas: The House of the Raja (LightBox)

Elliott Erwitt: Sequentially, Yours (Magnum)

Matt Bowditch: Afghan Blueys (Lightbox)

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff Nights (M – Le Monde magazine)

Daniel Lilley: The Isle of Vindelis (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks

Don McCullin (CNN)

VII photographers Kashi, Pagetti, Bleasdale, Kratochvil interviewed (Canon Digital Learning Center)

Finbarr O’Reilly (Reuters Photo blog)

It appears Martin Parr has ditched the Nintendo.. Looks like he’s doing his thang with 5D kit and a Gary Fong diffuser in this video…

Martin Parr (YouTube) “Magnum photographer Martin Parr was asked by FotoFreo Festival Director Bob Hewitt to photograph three Western Australian port cities, Fremantle, Broome and Port Hedland.”

Paolo Woods (YouTube)

Davide Monteleone (BJP)

Free Sunday evening? Check this out…

Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

BagNewsSalon webinar discussing the visual framing of “The Great Recession” in the United States and Europe : Date: Sunday October 16th : Time: 10 am PST/1 pm EST/6pm GMT (running for 90 minutes) : Where:  Open-i platform, hosted by the London School of Communications, via live audio : Facebook RSVP here.

Mirjana Vrbaski (Conscientious)

Laura El-Tantawi (Emphas.is)

Jake Price (Verve)

Sergey Chilikov (BJP)

Articles 

Guardian’s monthly recommendations on exhibitions and books…

photo: Bruce Davidson  .. Was fiddling Davidson’s book last weekend…Stunning photos..

Guardian: The Month in Photography

More on the Davidson work…

Guardian: Bruce Davidson’s subway photography takes us to New York’s heart

New Yorker: New Photography at MOMA

BBC: Injured photographer Giles Duley wants Afghanistan return

Magnum Photos have some found Libyan Secret Service photos in their archive…David Campbell raised the issue should they be for sale like any other Magnum photo… Read the debate below…I saw some of the photos printed in the Guardian in July…Credited to Magnum Photos…pic of the spread here (had it on my iPhone)..I don’t know did Guardian have to pay Magnum for this set to be published…

David Campbell: The Libyan Secret Service photo archive – questions for Magnum Photos (DC Storify)

David Campbell: The problem with the dramatic staging of photojournalism: what is the real issue? (DC website)

Telegraph: Diane Arbus, in her own words (TelePhoto)

Telegraph: An Emergency in Slow Motion: The Inner Life of Diane Arbus by William Todd Schultz: review (Telegraph)

NYT Lens: Bringing Turkish Photography to the World Stage

PDN: Steve Jobs: Visionary, Inventor, and Very Challenging Photo Subject (PDN)

Reasons Why Professional Photographers Cannot Work for Free (Professional Photographers)

Nick Turpin: Distrify: A new model for distribution? (photographer’s blog)

Time: Joel Sternfeld: A Modern Master’s First Pictures (Time Lightbox)

Thames and Hudson: Magnum Contact Sheets – Production

Wayne Ford: We English: Simon Roberts extensive survey of the English at leisure (Wayne Ford Posterous)

BJP: Noor Images adds Andrea Bruce and Giancarlo Ceraudo as new members

No Caption Needed: Review of Errol Morris, Believing is Seeing (Observations on the Mysteries of Photography) (New York: Penguin, 2011) (No Caption Needed)

Joanna Hurley: Notes on the Artist Statement (Hurley Media)

A Photo Editor: Why Does Everyone Think They Need A Photo Book? (APE) Joerg Colberg’s thoughts on the matter

Granta: Remembering Tim Hetherington

PDN Photo of the Day: Marcus Bleasdale: Early Morning Prayers (PDN)

NYT Lens: Jack Delano’s American Sonata

Gizmodo: Photoshop Will End Blurry Pics Forever

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Manu Brabo

Guardian: Featured photojournalist Ahmad Masood

The Independent: Out with the new: Turbine Hall’s latest work is tribute to old movies (Independent) | slide show (Guardian)  On a slightly different note, I was at Tate Modern over the weekend and saw their shop is selling Martin Parr Autoportrait ceramic plates for £65.. Fancy one? Take a look

Verve Photo: Diana Markosian (Verve)

Verve Photo: Katie Orlinsky (Verve)

Wired: Back to Basics: Analog Photography Project Aims to Slow Things Down

Adam Marelli: An in-depth look at Henri Cartier-Bresson’s composition style (adammarelliphoto.com)

Magnum Photos: Advice to young photographers (PDF)

Telegraph: National Gallery announces first major photography exhibition

PDN: Who Photographers Follow On Tumblr

Crowd funding

Condemned by Robin Hammond (Emphas.is)

Land of Hope and Dreams by Amnon Gutman (Kickstarter)

BTC oil pipeline by Amanda Rivkin (Empas.is)

Agencies and Collectives

Aletheia Newsletter

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

More awards for Yuri Kozyrev…

Yuri Kozyrev Wins 2 Prix Bayeux-Calvados Awards for Libya Coverage (PDN) Same news on BJP

Magenta Flash Forward 2012 Call for Submissions

Reminders…

Applications for the Tim Hetherington Grant are due 15 Oct. 

Time LightBox Next Generation Competition

NatGeo Photo Contest

IdeasTap Photographic Award: Finalists

Workshops

Grant Writing with Donald Weber : NYC Nov 17, 2011 : DC Nov 19, 2011

Duckrabbit three-day photo film workshops in London (30 Nov-2 Dec) and Birmingham (7-9 Dec)

Jobs

Brighton Photo Fringe is seeking a new Director

Events

BJP Vision 2011

multiMedia and Photo Communities

Foam Talent issue : Issuu

1000 Words : new issue

Contacts Editions

F8Magazine

52 by 52 : “A weekly photo challenge is set by fifty-two accomplished photographers throughout the course of a year”

Photographers

Reuters photographer, Finbarr O’Reilly, who shot the World Photo of the Year 2005,  has a website now…

Finbarr O’Reilly

Carlos Javier Ortiz

Paul Jeffrey

Sean Hawkey

To finish off… Seen it before, but was a giggle to bump into this again… The Life of Photographer

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“Every Jew has two requests of God: a place in paradise in the next world, and a place on the Tel Aviv beach in this world,” wrote Sholem Asch, the Polish-born novelist, in 1937. Stretching five kilometers from its southern tip at the old port city of Jaffa to the new cluster of high rise hotels and condos at its northern end, Tel Aviv’s beach (or Tayelet as it’s called in Hebrew) probably looked a little different in Asch’s day. But I think of him as part of a long legacy of both travelers and natives who have sought refuge in those sands from Israel’s political dramas, which can gush like a Texas oil well. At the beach, I discovered Israel in all its vitality, without the conflict.

I have been photographing in Israel for almost ten years. The beach is where I go to escape. I walk the full expanse of the shoreline, stopping every few feet to capture a moment. Others are there to escape, too: an eclectic mix of people—old, young, skinny, zaftig and maimed—interact there unlike anywhere else. Arab and Orthodox Jewish women, covered nearly head-to-toe, splash ecstatically in the waves. Suntanned Israeli men parade like peacocks in tiny speedos and large jewelry. Bespectacled, pre-pubescent Americans on teen tours, relatively new Russian emigrants, even newer Ethiopians, and the newest residents—exhausted Philippino or Chinese foreign workers. Everyone is there, and for the same same purpose: to take a break.

This is a nation filled with serious conversations and serious consequences, bad omens from the past and dire warnings of the future. But not on this sliver of sand. Only Tel Aviv’s beach has that unique ability to free Israelis from the yoke of daily turmoil, letting them frolic, flaunt and laugh—a joyful, if temporary, exhalation under a pure, blue sky. The beach, I’ve come to realize, is where the country comes to breathe.

Gillian Laub’s book Testimony, which features portraits of Israelis and Palestinians, was published in 2007. She is currently at work on a book and documentary about the American South.

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When envisioning a newfangled political-activist movement, it is unlikely that a female boarding school would be among the imagery your brain might conjure. But sure enough, perched atop a hillside in Israel’s West Bank in the settlement of Ma’ale Levona, sits a girls boarding school that is not only shaping the struggle between Israel and the Palestinians, but also among Israelis themselves.

After stumbling upon an article on the school from 2009, writer Elizabeth Rubin and photographer Gillian Laub trekked out to the West Bank for Tablet Magazine, to spend time with some of the students and recent graduates. What resulted is a stunning series of classically composed portraits of the women, ranging from 14 to 19-years-old, who ironically are known for slinging mud at riot police during protests.

To see Rubin’s story along with the rest of the 11 portraits published in Tablet Magazine, click here.

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Marco Grob for TIME

Ali Abbas, London, July 3, 2011

Yuri Kozyrev is known best for his photographs of conflict—he just won the top award at Visa pour l’Image, the international festival of photojournalism, for his coverage of the Arab Spring. But one of the photographs he’s shot that may have had the most impact is not of a battle, but of a badly burned 12-year-old boy lying in a Baghdad hospital bed, the victim of a misdirected allied bomb during the Iraq war. The picture of Ali Abbas ran in TIME‘s April 14, 2003 issue, generating a flood of media interest in the young Iraqi. Offers came from Canada and Britain to fit him with artificial arms and recover from his wounds, while donations poured into funds set up in his name.

When Kozyrev took the picture eight years ago, he was part of a small, strictly controlled group of journalists the Iraqi government allowed in Baghdad, then still under Hussein’s rule. They were taken to only a few sites, one of which was Abbas’ hospital, to be shown victims of U.S. bombings. “This was the way we could cover it. This was the way they wanted us to see the war,” says Kozyrev. As the journalists were escorted around the hallways, a doctor took Kozyrev’s elbow, pulling him away from the group, to the top floor of the hospital. There, alone with his aunt, was Abbas; asleep, badly burned and unaware that his entire family had been killed.

Kozyrev got off three frames, and talked briefly to the aunt before the doctor took him back to the group. “I was struck by Abbas,” says Kozyrev. “He was suffering. At the time, I don’t think he knew how bad it was.”

“The next day I decided to go to his village,” says Kozyrev, “fill in the details of his story and get confirmation that he was bombed.” With his driver, Kozyrev snuck out of the hotel and headed south out of the city. Stopped once by armed Iraqi soldiers, who let him go once they understood his mission, Kozyrev found the ruins of the farm and an uncle who was looking through the rubble told him about Abbas’ family.

After the photo was published, Kozyrev saw Abbas only once more—at a hospital in Sadr City, where the boy had been moved. When Kozyrev went to check on him, he found a line of journalists waiting to interview Abbas. “He was crying,” says Kozyrev. “By then, he realized what had happened to him.”

In July, for TIME‘s 9/11 commemorative issue, Swiss photographer Marco Grob took Abbas’ portrait in London, while reporter William Lee Adams asked him about his life since the bombing. Abbas, who recently became a UK citizen, talked about hoping to set up a charity for victims of war.

Kozyrev keeps abreast of Abbas’ progress, asking about him through friends in the UK. ”I know he is doing OK,” says Kozyrev. “Or as well has a boy who has been through what he has can be. But people should know he was only one of many wounded kids in the hospital that day.”

To see TIME’s interview with Ali Abbas, click here.

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TIME contract photographer Marco Grob shares an intimate look into the making of the portraits and oral history series that comprise Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience.  The project reveals the astonishing testimonies from over 40 men and women including George W. Bush, Tom Brokaw, General David Petraeus, Valerie Plame Wilson, Black Hawk helicopter pilot Tammy Duckworth, as well as the heroic first responders to Ground Zero. After looking into one of America’s greatest tragedies, Grob now shares his side of the story, and what it was like to be on the other side of the lens.

To visit TIME’s Beyond 9/11: A Portrait of Resilience, a project that chronicles 9/11 and its aftermath, click here. TIME: VOICES OF 9/11, a full length film of Grob’s work will be screened at Film Forum, located at 209 West Houston Street, New York, NY 10014. For more information go to their website by clicking here.

See more of Marco Grob’s work by clicking here.

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