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Images from the aftermath of the Sandy Hook school shooting were seen around the word. The photographs, showing both reaction and grief, were a reminder of the other tragedies from the year, including the Aurora theater shooting. In an image provided by NASA Tuesday Dec. 18, 2012 NASA’s Cassini spacecraft delivered a glorious view of [...]

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Earlier this month, TIME sent contract photographer Marco Grob to the Tennessee Performing Arts Center (TPAC) in Nashville to photograph comedian Jerry Lewis. Now 86 years old, Lewis, profiled by Richard Zoglin in this week’s issue of TIME, is filling his days directing a musical version of The Nutty Professor—adapted from the film he originally wrote and starred in back in 1963. The new stage version, in collaboration with the late composer Marvin Hamlisch and lyricist Rupert Holmes, is being performed at TPAC through the end of the weekend in a bid for a slot on Broadway.

Although he’s photographed subjects as diverse as Hillary Clinton and Lady Gaga, Grob still felt nervous as he waited for Lewis to arrive for his portrait shoot. Experience photographing other comedians led Grob to expect Lewis to be a handful—a worry that proved to be completely unfounded when the legendary funny man showed up.

During the ten-minute shoot, Grob learned that Lewis shared a passion for photography. ”He carries a camera with him everywhere he goes,” says Grob. “It’s pretty much the same equipment we use to film. He’s very professional.”

Grob was also excited to photograph a man he had grown up watching on television. “He’s a legend in Europe,” says the Swiss-born Grob. “It’s always fascinating to meet people who were around all my lifespan, especially someone with as crazy a career as Jerry.”

Marco Grob is a contract photographer for TIME. View more of his work for TIME here or on his website.

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About

Women Logic (also known as “Female Logic”) is a term primarily used by men to describe a range of behaviors and thought processes that would be seen as distinctly feminine. In realms of popular culture, such concept of woman’s logic has been employed as a comedy trope to explain various differences between men and women and sometimes for misogynistic humor. On the web, the trope has been adapted into a variety of image macros and rage comics since early 2011.

Origin

The concept of women’s logic as having a separate value system unfathomable by men has been explored through romance comedy films, TV shows like Seinfeld (shown below) and many stand up comedians as early as since the 1990s.

In the news media, “woman’s logic” and “female logic” have been used in a number of editorial columns and articles, with the earliest known example found in the introductory paragraph of a sports column published in The Independent[2] on December 12th, 1999. In the early 2000s, a list-style copypasta of common English idioms and phrases translated accordingly to the female logic (shown below) began to spread across several discussion forums and personal blogs.[1]

Original Text

* “Yes” = No
* “No” = Yes
* “Maybe” = No
* “I’m sorry” = You’ll be sorry
* “We need” = I want
* “It’s your decision” = The correct decision should be obvious by now
* “Do what you want” = You’ll pay for this later
* “We need to talk” = I need to complain
* “Sure go ahead” = I don’t want you to
* “I’m not upset” = Of course I’m upset, you moron!

* “You’re so manly” = You need a shave and you sweat a lot
* “Be romantic, turn out the lights” = I have flabby thighs
* “This kitchen is so inconvenient” = I want a new house
* “I want new curtains” = and carpeting, and furniture, and wallpaper
* “I heard a noise” = I noticed you were almost asleep
* “Do you love me?” = I’m going to ask for something expensive
* “I’ll be ready in a minute” = Just going to wash my hair
* “You have to learn to communicate” = Just agree with me
* “Are you listening to me!?” = Too late, you’re dead
* “How much do you love me?” = I did something you’re going to hate

Spread

The term “woman’s logic” continued to appear in discussion threads about relationships and gender differences on various forums, including on Airline Crew forum[17] in December 2004, SoSuave forum[3] in May 2006 and the Bungie forum[4] in September 2009 among elsewhere. The first Urban Dictionary entry for the term “female logic”[6] was submitted on March 5th, 2008, which is defined as:

An oxymoron of the greatest magnitude. Male logic (or just plain logic) follows a direct path, clearly tying the consequences of action to the actor. Female logic doesn’t follow a direct path. Female logic always contains a patsie, something to blame her actions on just in case something goes wrong. This is why whenever a girl screws up, it’s never her fault – she’s used female logic to cover her ass.

Another Urban Dictionary definition for “Women Logic”[7] submitted on December 24th, 2011 defines it in a similar tone:

The un-logical decision, that eaither is a contridiction to the original decision or dosent make sense.

The earliest known Reddit post related to the keyword “Women Logic” was submitted by user theKalash on September 17th, 2011, which featured a picture of Hillary Clinton with the quote “Women have always been the primary victims of war. Women lose their husbands, their fathers, their sons in combat.” Four days later on September 21st, the first known instance of rage comic illustrating the concept (shown below) was submitted to the /r/f7u12 subreddit by lockster.

Not surprisingly, women’s logic as a discussion topic has been most prevalent on male-centric communities like 4chan[9][10][11][12] and Reddit[13] as well as internet humor sites like FunnyJunk[8] and The Chive[15], where hundreds of rage comics and image macros remain in active circulation as of June 2012. In addition, similar iterations based on the trope can be found on Tumblr[14] under the tag #women logic.

Notable Examples


Notable Derivative: X Logic

The term “logic” has gained common usage in general for mocking the behavior, acts or thought processes of other subjects, varying between videogames, animals, objects, etc. Images of these can often be found on Reddit and have also spawned numerous Advice Animal style image macros on Quickmeme. Popular subjects include Men’s Logic[20], Dog Logic[21][22]Cat Logic[23] and Grand Theft Auto Logic [19].

Related Memes

Crazy Girlfriend Praying Mantis

Crazy Girlfriend Praying Mantis is an advice animal image macro series featuring a photo of a praying mantis set against a blue and teal colorwheel background. The overlaid text typically describes what an overbearing, irrational or obsessive girlfriend might say to her significant other.

Irrational Black Woman

Irrational Black Woman is an advice animal image macro series featuring an African American woman wearing a business suit. The series is heavily influenced by the stereotype of irrational expectations set by certain African American females in popular films and TV shows, especially in regard to romantic interests and interactions with significant others.

Friend Zone Fiona

Friend Zone Fiona is an advice animal image macro series with a stock photo of a laughing girl. The caption technique is similar to Successful Black Man, where the top refers to something a girl would say romantically followed by the bottom text confirming that she is just a friend.

Feminist Nazi

Feminist Nazi is an advice animal image macro series featuring a photograph of Australian reality TV star Layla Joyce Subritzky from the ninth season of Big Brother Australia. The captions typically depict a naive approach to stereotypical feminist ideas, in a similar manner to College Liberal.

Overly Attached Girlfriend

Overly Attached Girlfriend is an advice animal image macro featuring webcam picture of a girl and various captions portraying her in the stereotype of an overprotective and clingy girlfriend.

Good Girl Gina

Good Girl Gina is an advice animal image macro series featuring a photograph of a smiling girl and various captions portraying the subject as a considerate and sometimes overly compliant girlfriend. The character can be seen as the anthesis of Scumbag Stacy.

Scumbag Stacy

Scumbag Stacy is an advice animal style image macro series featuring a photo of a scantily clad young woman posing in a bedroom. The overlaid text typically consists of unethical, selfish and sadistic behaviors that are meant to represent the female counterpart to Scumbag Steve.

Search Interest

External References

[1]Clan of Idiots Forum – For Men’s Eyes Only!!!

[2]The Independent – Fishing Lines: Just what I always wanted – a split-cane rod

[3]So Suave – Women’s thought processes vs. men’s

[4]Bungie – Post Women Logic

[5]PPRune Forum – Women’s logic!!

[6]Urban Dictionary – Female Logic

[7]Urban Dictionary – Women Logic

[8]FunnyJunk – Search Results for Women Logic=

[9]4chan – ITT Women Logic

[10]4chan – Intelligence of Men and Women

[11]4chan – Lol women trying to pass off their slutiness as our fault

[12]4chan – ITT women have no idea what they want

[13]Reddit – Search Results for Women Logic

[14]Tumblr – Tagged Results for Women Logic

[15]The Chive – Women’s logic: Redefining thousands of years of science

[16]Huffington Post – ’Women’s Logic’: The Game Show Sparking Debate About Gender In Georgia

[17]Airline Crew Forum – What Women Really Mean

[18]D2JSP Forums – Women Logic

[19]Quickmeme – GTA Logic

[20]Quickmeme – Men Logic

[21]Reddit – Search: ‘Dog Logic’

[22]Quickmeme – Dog Logic

[23]Reddit – Search: ‘Cat Logic’

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With well over a year before American forces pull out of Afghanistan, the conflict there drags on. Every month in The Big Picture, we feature a selection of recent images of events there, from the soldiers and insurgents at war, the people longing for peace, and daily life and culture in the country of 29 million. Afghanistan remains among the world's poorest nations, and struggles with issues not found in other places, like an ongoing fight against polio. Afghanistan still supplies about 90% of the world's opium, a major cash crop in a country with few viable exports. Gathered here are images from April, 2012. -- Lane Turner (33 photos total)
Afghan policemen are mirrored in glass from a broken window as they stand guard outside the building where Taliban fighters launched an attack in Kabul on April 16, 2012. A total of 36 Taliban militants were killed as they mounted a wave of attacks across Afghanistan. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

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In a Republican primary season that saw changing frontrunners, surprise defections and shifting poll numbers, there was one constant the public could count on: Callista Gingrich’s perfectly-coiffed, platinum blond bob, with its signature swoop to the left. The interest in her hair was also constant—a pollster for the Gingrich campaign told the New York Times that the candidate’s wife was asked about the look “at every stop” on the campaign trail.

The interest is predictable at this point, as politicians and their spouses have come under increased scrutiny for their hair choices in recent years. From Hillary Clinton’s ponytails and headbands to Michelle Obama’s pinned back updo for a 2009 event, every departure from a public figure’s normal hairstyle creates a media stir. Which is why Gingrich’s consistency was so remarkable.

George Ozturk of Washington’s George Salon at the Four Seasons, which Callista Gingrich used to frequent, describes her hairstyle as an updated 1970s bob. “Only in this country would a potential president’s wife’s hairstyle get so much attention,” says Ozturk, who has styled Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and King Abdullah II of Jordan, among others. “But it has become so well-known that to change it now would be a big mistake for Mrs. Gingrich.”

Paul Ramadan, a hairstylist at Washington’s Nantucket Hair Salon who previously worked with former Second Lady Lynn Cheney, says that, in general, women tend to get picked on more than their male counterparts for their beauty and sartorial choices. “Callista’s hairstyle is not typical—it could be a little more contemporary, but I think this is how she likes it,” Ramadan says of the heightened awareness of the look. “It’s a nice bob, but Mrs. Cheney and Mrs. [Laura] Bush just blended in more.”

With Newt Gingrich leaving the presidential race, LightBox looks back on Callista Gingrich’s now-famous Swoosh.

More photos: Newt Gingrich’s Life in Pictures

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The long and legendary supermodel era of the ’90s can be summed up in one gorgeous and distinct photograph: Herb Ritts’ now-iconic shot of Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, Tatjana Patitz and Stephanie Seymour huddled together in the nude.

But the 1989 sitting almost didn’t happen.

As Campbell recalls, Turlington was on a Calvin Klein contract and reportedly wasn’t allowed to participate. “We said, ‘How can you not be in this picture?’” Campbell says. “And she jumped in, and that was it!”

That black-and-white image is just one of nearly 80 photographs on display at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles as part of a new exhibition and book on the photographer. Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, on view through Aug. 12, focuses on the portraits and nudes from Ritts, who documented models, musicians, actresses and other celebrities for magazines such as Interview, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair throughout his career.

“He always had a vision about how he wanted every picture,” Campbell says. “He liked strength in his pictures, and he got you to do things that you never thought you could do. He was very encouraging and would talk to you about a picture first, and slowly get you there to where he wanted. And you’d be amazed that you even could do that. It was always a pleasure working with him. He was a complete gentleman, and I loved every picture he took of me.”

Herb Ritts—© Herb Ritts Foundation

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Campbell first met Ritts in the late ’80s when she was introduced by fellow model Tatitz. She would often stay with him when she visited Los Angeles, and the two later traveled together to South Africa, where Ritts captured the first photograph of the supermodel with former South African president Nelson Mandela. “He was just a really special human being, and someone that I know is dearly missed in fashion—you never see that kind of picture anymore,” Campbell says.

And while many people revere the image of the five supermodels as one of the most famous sittings in fashion photography, Campbell says they had no idea it would become so iconic. “It was just nice for us to be together,” she says. “We rarely get to do pictures together—even to this day—so it was like a catch-up time for us. We got there in the morning, had lunch and then he told us what we were going to do. It was easy—it was always easy with Herb.”

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the book by Paul Martineau is available here.

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It’s not unusual for photojournalists to travel to places that have been scarred by genocide, accident and natural disaster. But photographer Ambroise Tézenas has spent the last few years turning that norm on its head to capture what happens to those sites after the journalists leave, when they become tourist destinations.

In 2008, Tézenas was looking for his next photographic project when he read that a train, swept into the Sri Lankan jungle by a tsunami, was still there four years after the fact. Tézenas happened to have been in Sri Lanka at the time of the storm—on a vacation that became a job—and was fascinated to learn that the train had become a place of pilgrimage.

“Some tourists were coming to have their pictures taken there,” the photographer says. “I thought about what the victims and the survivors would think.”

That question became the seed of a long-term project, Dark Tourism, now on view at Galerie Mélanie Rio in Nantes, France. Tézenas immersed himself in the tourist experience: he always traveled with a tour group, always paid for the experience and only took pictures of things any tourist could see. Sometimes that ethos meant his pictures were restrained—he only had the time allotted by the tourism groups, so he was unable to wait for ideal light—but it also allowed the photographer to comment on more than the scenery.

“It wasn’t just to find new places nobody had seen,” says Tézenas, “but to link these places and to have a portrait of a new tendency of tourism.”

Not that so-called “dark tourism” is new. Professor John Lennon of Glasgow Caledonian University, who coined the term in 1996 and whose work influenced Tézenas’ project, says that the urge to turn the tourist’s gaze on horror—what Lennon calls the “pull factor” of the macabre—dates back to the spectators at the Battle of Waterloo, and further than that, to the first people who watched crucifixions as spectacle.

“It’s a human fascination with our ability to do evil, a human fascination with death,” he explains. “It’s so unimaginably terrible but it exerts this fascination.” Survey data has shown him that the impulse comes from a cross between genuine interest in history, voyeurism and, especially in recent years, commoditization, the kind of pre-packaged deals of which Tézenas availed himself. That ease of access is, according to Lennon, the new factor in the equation.

Tézenas saw that commercialization in action at a Latvian jail where tourists could pay to play prisoner and be terrorized by guards in the middle of the night, on a guided visit to Chernobyl and on a “genocide tour” of Rwanda. Lennon points out that “visiting sites of genocide doesn’t prevent genocide from happening again” and that certain gift shops can make visitors queasy, but tourism can benefit economies that are still recovering from disaster.

And, for Tézenas, it was a subject that was ripe for exploration. “In our time, we are so close to death through news and cinema and video games, but at the same time death is so removed from our contemporary society,” he says, explaining that he hoped to use photography to get to the root of the sociological phenomenon. “I want to raise the point, very humbly, because there are so many questions.”

Dark Tourism will be on view at Galerie Mélanie Rio in Nantes, France, through May 12. Ambroise Tézenas is a French photographer. See more of his work here.

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From glitter-bombs to meetings inside the White House Situation Room, politicians are prone to becoming Internet memes in this digital age. Hillary Clinton became the latest example last week, when a black-and-white image of the Secretary of State, in stylish shades, looking at her phone went viral through a Tumblr page called Texts From Hillary. Elsewhere, we found companies like Bravo who posted a version of the image on its Facebook page, with  language promoting their reality series, The Real Housewives of D.C. The images are being shared on countless Facebook pages and social media outlets everywhere.

The buzzed-about image was actually taken by Diana Walker on assignment for TIME back in October 2011. In fact, Walker, who worked as TIME’s White House photographer for 20 years under Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton, was recently awarded the Luce Lifetime Achievement Award for her remarkable contributions to political photography, of which the Clinton picture is just one example. Taken during a weeklong trip with the Secretary of State for a TIME cover story, Walker’s image shows Clinton reading her mobile phone upon departure in a military plane bound for Tripoli, Libya on Oct. 18, 2011. A similar image by Kevin Lamarque of Reuters, who was also on the trip, is being also being used on the Tumblr.

Photograph by Diana Walker for TIME

The original photo that started the meme was taken on October 18, 2011 by Diana Walker at the start of a week long trip through the middle east. In the photo Hillary Clinton checks her PDA, in her sunglasses, upon departure in a military plane from Malta, bound for Tripoli.

Today businesses everywhere benefit from social media’s incredible power to drive traffic to their own web sites, and it’s a vital if not necessary means of distributing information, advertising and entertainment on the web. Diana Walker’s photo is by no means the first image to be used in this way, but it again raises many questions about the ease of appropriation on the Internet. In the case of Texts from Hillary, is Walker’s photograph fair game for political satire? When do you actually cross the line from satire to sharing… to stealing?

On TIME photo’s website and TIME branded social media, we always aim to credit photographers, promote their work and link back to the original source, but today there are no clear rules to follow. (Case in point: we don’t know where all the photos from Texts from Hillary, used in this gallery, originated.) At TIME we established our own standards to treat photographers fairly, but should clearer laws be made? We’d like to hear what you think about this issue in the current age of new social media. Please add your comments below.

Text by Feifei Sun, Associate Editor and Paul Moakley, Deputy Photo Editor, TIME.

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