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Joe Klein

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“The campaign is in a lull. The wars overseas are winding down. Washington is paralyzed. I’ve loaded up my iPod with some new songs. There’s nothing to do but….hit the road!”

With that, veteran TIME political columnist Joe Klein began his three-week, eight-state road trip, which ended last Friday. Klein has made this sampling of the country’s political climate a yearly tradition. This time around, TIME sent three of the magazine’s contributors to accompany Klein for different legs of the journey. Here, LightBox presents a selection of their work as well as their thoughts from across America.


What was the single most memorable experience you had on the trip?

Andrew HinderakerIn Richmond, Virginia, at a Narcotics Anonymous meeting in a Drug Rehabilitation Center, we met a woman who’d struggled with addiction since age nine. She was a convicted felon, and now, in her 40’s, was 21 months clean. She’d recently convinced a friend to allow her to farm a piece of land. For someone like her, whose addiction left her reliant on medical care most of her life, President Obama’s healthcare legislation meant for her a fresh start. With affordable healthcare, she could be a small business owner, a farmer, an active, contributing citizen; without it, she’s just a recovering addict. We learned her story because another man at the meeting expressed his disdain at the Healthcare Reform Act. We got to watch their argument, and this woman’s story change a man’s mind. It certainly proved Joe’s point about getting to know one another; perhaps the government should sponsor free coffee and organize meetings once a week with a group of local strangers.

What was the economic and political mood of the parts of the country you visited?

Katy Steinmetz: People seemed disappointed and exhausted by the political and economic state of things in America. Many were hopeful, but more were resigned—past anger and yearning for a little compromise.

What was the #1 problem facing the people you met?

Pete Pin: This was dependent on class. For a group of upper middle class voters in Charleston, West Virginia, they were most concerned with the visceral partisanship of the country and the future of the health care law. For rural voters in Jackson and Newcomerstown, Ohio, they were most concerned with jobs and social ills.

What was their #1 reason for hope?

Pete: Community at the local level. I learned that in spite of the partisanship and bickering in Washington, people genuinely believed that things can and will get better, not because of intervention by the federal government, but rather because of the community coming together at the local level.

Andrew Hinderaker for TIME

Leslie Marchut and Briggs Wesche eat breakfast with Joe Klein in Chapel Hill, N.C.

What is the national character? Are there uniquely American traits?

Pete: The singular thread I found was an overwhelming sense of self-reliance. Liberalism in the classical sense, John Stuart Mill.

AndrewEveryone likes barbeque.

Did you return from the trip more or less optimistic about the future of the country?

Andrew: Certainly more optimistic. One of the things that struck me most about the places that we visited was all the conversation. In all these pockets of America, folks more than willing, eager even, to talk and debate reach new conclusions. I don’t think it’s the impression you’d get of our citizens from watching the nightly news, but it’s something I observed in every niche.

Andrew Hinderaker is a former TIME photo intern and a photojournalist whose work has appeared in TIME, The Wall Street Journal and New York Magazine.

Pete Pin is currently the international photo intern at TIME and a photographer whose work has also appeared in The New York Times and Forbes.

Katy Steinmetz is a reporter in TIME’s Washington bureau.

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Features and Essays 

Coming up in National Geographic Magazine’s November issue…

Chuffed to see that Erika Larsen’s Sami series has made it to NatGeo..Looking forward to seeing it in print….

Erika Larsen: Sami Reindeer Herders (NGM)

Pascal Maitre,Joel Sartore, and Carsten Peter: Rift in Paradise—Africa’s Albertine Rift (NGM)

I’m sure you’ll remember this too..

Timothy Archibald: Echolilia (NGM)

Two series by Stephanie Sinclair…This one is terrific…

Stephanie Sinclair: Hillary’s Angels (VII)  Women working as secretary of state’s security detail

Stephanie Sinclair: Phiona Mutesi, a Ugandan chess prodigy (VII Magazine)

Libya…

New Magnum in Motion piece by Moises Saman on Libya’s last days Gaddafi’s rule…

Moises Saman: Theater of War (Magnum in Motion)

Another Magnum photographer’s, Alex Majoli’s series in Newsweek….

Alex Majoli: Libyans in a Strange Land (Newsweek)

Mauricio Lima for the New York Times:

Mauricio Lima: In Surt, Chronicle of a Death Foretold (NYT Lens) Libya

Elsewhere in Middle East…

Alfredo D’Amato: Early Days of Spring (Panos) Tunisia

Portraits of Occupy Wall Street protestors in Zuccotti Park by Martin Schoeller in New Yorker and Sasha Bezzubov in TIME …

Bezzubov’s series on Lightbox opens with a crowd shot that was printed double spread in the magazine… See below how that and the portraits were used in print…

Sasha Bezzubov: Taking It to the Streets (Lightbox)

I haven’t seen how Schoeller’s portraits were used in print…

Martin Schoeller: Portraits From Occupy Wall Street (New Yorker)

To other things…

Global warming and rising sea level…

Amelia Holowaty Krales: Tuvalu, an Island in Danger (NYT Lens) Amelia Holowaty Krales’s website

Jocelyn Carlin: Global Warming’s Front Line (Panos)

Robin Hammond: Tuvalu Sunset (Panos)

James Whitlow Delano: The True Price, With a Hidden Cost (NYT Lens)

Tomas van Houtryve: Borderline: Bordeline: In the Shadow of North Korea (Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund)

Three Lynsey Addario series..This first one’s from the States…and her road trip with Joe Klein…

Lynsey Addario: Return to the American Road (Lightbox)

Lynsey Addario: Abandoning a Controversial Tradition (NYT) Genital cutting, Senegal

Lynsey Addario: Iraq Investors (VII)

Donald Weber: Quniqjuk, Qunbuq, Quabaa (VII)

John Vink: Cambodia 2011 Floods (Magnum)

New work from some of the Cesuralab photographers…

Luca Santese, Gabriele Micalizzi: Roma Violenta (Cesuralab)

Andy Rocchelli: Anzhi Makhachkala (Cesuralab) Makhachkala is the capital of Daghestan

Chien-Chi Chang: Burma: Land of Shadows (Magnum)

Sebastien Liste: Urban Quilombo (burn)

Kyoko Hamada: Letter to Fukushima (New Yorker)

Carolyn Drake: Among the Animals in Turkey (New Yorker)

Doug Richard: American Suburb (project website)

Boogie: The View From Kingston, Jamaica (AnnalsofAmericus)

Lizzie Sadin: Young and Imprisoned (NYT Lens) Sadin’s website

Ashley Gilbertson: MREs (Slate) includes a short interview with Gilbertson

Ryan Pfluger: Milwaukee’s Alliance School, the only gay-friendly charter school in the U.S. (Lightbox)

Richard Misrach: The Oakland-Berkeley Fire Photos  (Lightbox)

Sophie Gerrard: Protectors of Sight (BBC)

Samuel Hauenstein Swan: Somalis seek refuge in Ethiopian camps (Guardian)

Samuel: Hauenstein Swan: Tackling life-threatening child malnutrition in Chad (Guardian)

Elliott Erwitt:  Sequentially Yours (Lightbox)

Brent Stirton: The Malapa Fossils (Reportage)

Peter Dench: Dench’s England (NYT Lens)

Jules Allen: The Sweet Science of Body and Soul (NYT Lens) Allen’s website

Spike Johnson: Dale Farm Eviction (Foto8) Johnson’s archive

Kieran Doherty: Royal Wootton Bassett repatriations (Guardian)

Articles

Pretty gruesome images today in the videos showing Gaddafi captured and eventually killed…New Yorker’s Jon Lee Anderson comments…

C.I.A. agent Felix Rodriguez, left, with Che Guevara, center, before Guevara was executed in Bolivia, in 1967. Photograph: AP Photo/Courtesy of Felix Rodriguez.

Jon Lee Anderson: Picturing the Dead (New Yorker)

The day that marked Colonel Gaddafi’s death, marked also 6 months from the death of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros…Mike Kamber wrote about his friend Hetherington in New York Times Lens blog…

photo: Tim Hetherington

Mike Kamber: A Show of Respect for a Fallen Friend Tim Hetherington (NYT Lens)

C.J. Chivers: On the Day Qaddafi Dies, News – And Art – from Tim. (Journalist’s website)

Hadn’t seen this Hetherington video before…

Tim Hetherington: His Life and His Work (Vimeo)

BJP: Magnum Photos addresses Libyan Secret Service photo archive controversy | David Campbell’s comment

Source magazine: Collecting Photographs, Copyrights and Cash

An invitation to all monochrome photographers (BJP) “Emerging black-and-white photographers are invited to submit their work to Mono, a hardback photobook which will also include Roger Ballen, Anders Peterson and Oliver Pin Fat.”

Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin: Photojournalism and the war of images (Guardian)

Silly…Guardian writes about Chloe Dewe Mathews’ BJP award winning Caspia work and then crops all four of her photos shown…The photos are originally 6×7…I wonder if they’d ever do the same to a painter?

Guardian: Lives bathed in oil: how Chloe Dewe Mathews captured the Caspian coast (Guardian) “In her award-winning Caspian series, the young British photographer explores the healthy and unhealthy relationship between oil and people in a spa town in Azerbaijan”

AP Photographer Ed Reinke Dies After Assignment Injury (PDN)

NYT: Barry Feinstein, Dies at 80

PDN: Barry Feinstein, who took classic shots of Dylan, Joplin, Steve McQueen, Geo Harrison, has died at 80

PDN: Custom Tools of the Trade

LA Times: Movie review: ‘Hell and Back Again’ | Guardian review

NPPA Visual Student: Insights and Experiences from the 2011 Eddie Adams Workshop

BJP’s news editors Olivier Laurent takes a look back at this year’s Visa…

BJP: The Optimists – A look back at this year’s Visa Pour l’Image festival

Photoshelter: Your Year-end Photography Business Plan

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Paul Bronstein

Guardian: Photographer Shahidul Alam’s best shot

Ai Weiwei’s Photo Shoot from China (NYT)

Brooks Kraft’s frames on Lightbox prove you don’t need to use a filter app to make a good iPhone photo…Refreshing…

Brooks Kraft: iPhone4 S frames (Lightbox)

Verve: Tessa Bunney

Verve: Rony Zakaria

multiMedia

 Once Magazine for iPad : issue 1 available on iTunes Store

Blogs

The Map is Not the Territory : Vanessa Winship and George Georgiou are exploring America

Awards, Grants, Funds, and Competitions

The Chris Hondros Fund has launched (BJP)

The Chris Hondros Fund website

Krisanne Johnson Awarded the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography (Time Lightbox)

W. Eugene Smith Grant Awarded to Krisanne Johnson (NYT Lens)

Hondros, Hetherington Prizes Awarded at Eddie Adams Workshop (PDN)

Spanish photographer Daniel Beltrá has won this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year award (BJP)

BJP: Three £3000 commissions up for grabs from Side Gallery

Interviews

photo in tear sheet: Shawn Baldwin

Errol Morris on Photography: Believing Is Seeing (Lightbox)

Henry Rollins (Featureshoot) “interview with Henry Rollins about his new photo book, ‘Occupants’”

Spencer Murphy (SIP)

Don McCullin (BBC Radio)

Old Nachtwey interview from 2002…

James Nachtwey (Apple Canada: 2002)

Yaakov Israel : CPC 2011 Winner (Conscientious)

Exhibitions and Events

Bryan Denton’s Libya exhibition opened on the same day as Gaddafi got killed… Fitting…

Revolution Photographs from Libya 2011 by Bryan Denton : October 20, 2011 – November 19, 2011 : Gulf + Western Gallery  721 Broadway, at Waverly – Ground Floor New York, NY 10003

Tim Hetherington – Visions  : October 22, 2011 till December 02, 2011 United States New York Venue details Bronx Documentary Center 614 Courtlandt Ave (at 151st) Bronx, New York 10451 United States www.bronxdoc.org info@bronxdoc.org

Need help pricing and editioning your work?

The Social  : Print Sales: Editioning, pricing, printing, and more : Monday 24 October

Foto8 : Making it Happen Seminar : 26 November 2011 : London

Agencies

VII Newsletter October 2011

photo: Paolo Woods

Institute for Artist Management adds three photographers (BJP)

Books

Magnum Photographers: Women Changing India

Equipment

Canon 1D X (CPN)

Klynt : “the interactive editing & publishing application dedicated to creative storytellers.”

Photographers

Art Streiber

Tiffany L. Clark

Daniel Sullivan

Samuel Hauenstein Swan

Richard Flint

To finish off…. iPhone 4S / Canon 5d MKII Side by Side Comparison

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The night before the tenth anniversary of September 11, I flew out to San Antonio to begin a three-week road trip across America with TIME columnist Joe Klein, from Laredo, Texas up to Des Moines, Iowa.

In the seat next to me, a beautiful woman sat caring for her quadriplegic son, who was sitting in the adjacent row with her daughter. Susan Bradley and her daughter were tender and attentive with Matt in a way that made me think his injuries were new. I, shooting my first assignment in the U.S. after 11 years of covering conflict in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Congo, Darfur, Lebanon, Somalia and Libya, assumed he was injured at war. Matt was 24, the age of so many young, American men I have spent years with on military embeds in Afghanistan, documenting the war unfolding over the years and witnessing heavy combat and brutal injuries.

As it turns out, Matt had nothing to do with Afghanistan. Like almost everyone Joe and I would meet on the road trip, the war rested on the periphery of their lives, and their primary concerns were here at home. Matt, a football player in college, and the son of a professional football player, had been rafting in Sacramento, California, when he stepped in to rescue a woman being abused by her boyfriend. As Matt walked away, the man allegedly followed him with a mag-light, and beat him on the back of the neck with the heavy flashlight, causing spinal cord injuries that left him paralyzed.

I don’t know why that moment stuck with me. I just immediately connect everything to the wars I have been covering overseas, and that’s not the case back home. I wrongly assumed all Americans at home were as consumed with our troops in Afghanistan as I was abroad.

Over the last decade, I have come to know details about most Afghan warlords, the infinite humanitarian crises across Africa, statistics of maternal mortality rates of women around the world, but I’ve become a stranger in my own country, unfamiliar with the pertinent issues at home and with what Americans are thinking the year before another presidential election. I generally don’t follow domestic news that much aside from how it relates to the stories I’m covering abroad, like what Americans think of the War in Afghanistan.

In three weeks of extensive interviews and casual conversations, I don’t remember a single person, except for veteran Anthony Smith, who was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade in Iraq, bringing up the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, without being prompted by a pointed question. Almost everyone spoke about the economy, healthcare and unemployment. People are polarized. Some are angry, and many say they are disillusioned with President Obama.

Working with Joe was quite an honor—for me, it was like a free education of politics in America. I sat in a lot of his interviews and asked him a lot of questions. Of course, I felt incredibly ignorant, because so often they were questions I should known the answers to—about politics in the States, who was running, what their platforms were. But I honestly hadn’t been following them that closely because I’ve been gone.

In fact, I’ve been gone so long that it took a while to familiarize myself with what the scenes were of the story in each city, and what the reoccurring topics of discussion were. Once I did that, I felt like I needed more time to go back and actually shoot because we moved so quickly. The pace of traveling to one city a day made it difficult for me to figure out what there was to shoot. It’s not like there was a specific protest or news event going on. It was just the city, or a gas station, or a diner, so I had to really talk to people and find out where I need to be as a photographer.

Overall though, it was really nice to be home. It was nice to be in my own country, where I didn’t need a translator or a driver. Where I didn’t need to figure out cultural references or what hijab I needed to wear to cover my hair. Americans are really lovely people—friendly, kind and willing to help you out. For me, it was incredibly humbling to come back and spend three weeks just talking to Americans all across the country and listening to what they had to stay.

Lynsey Addario is a regular contributor to TIME. See more of her work here

Read Joe Klein’s cover story from the Oct. 24, 2011 issue of TIME [available to subscribers] here.

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