Skip navigation
Help

Joel Saget

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Seemingly strange weather patterns continue to break high and low temperature records. The same patterns spawned an early tornado season in the midwestern United States and brought late season snowstorms to the west. Record snow falls and frigid temperatures characterized a particularly difficult winter across Europe with many deaths attributed to the conditions. Signs of Spring for the Northern Hemisphere (which began officially with the Vernal Equinox - March 20 - when the hours of day are approximately equal to the hours of night) like trees blossoming and flowers blooming, the shedding of winter coats and the desire of anyone -who has spent an all too long winter season indoors - to venture outside to soak up the sun. -- Paula Nelson (45 photos total)
Cherry blossoms of the Japanese Yoshino variety bloom along the Tidal Basin, March 19, 2012, in Washington, DC, with the Jefferson Memorial to the rear. This season celebrates the 100-year anniversary of the gift of the cherry trees from Japan to Washington, DC. (Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

Today is the vernal equinox, the first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. It also marks the end of "the winter that wasn't," as the past several months in North America have been dubbed. It was the fourth-warmest winter in the United States since record-keeping began 117 years ago. In accord with the unusual weather, this turn of the season brings us snow in Arizona and Saudi Arabia, while conditions remain sunny and warm in America's Northeast and Western Europe. Collected here are scenes from around the world as a strange winter gives way to spring. [40 photos]

The sun sets behind cherry blossoms which have come into full bloom due to the early warm weather in Washington, D.C., on March 19, 2012. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

0
Your rating: None

Earlier this week, U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta indicated that American forces in Afghanistan would be accelerating their withdrawal. "Hopefully by the mid-to-latter part of 2013," Panetta said, "we'll be able to make a transition from a combat role to a training, advice, and assist role." This announcement came shortly after the Taliban declared its plans to open a political office in Qatar, allowing for direct peace negotiations. At the moment, the U.S. still has 90,000 troops stationed in Afghanistan, with 22,000 scheduled to return home later this year. Gathered here are images of the people and places involved in this conflict over the past month, as part of an ongoing monthly series on Afghanistan. [42 photos]

Men of 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, during an operation near the end of their third deployment in three years in Afghanistan. They were securing route 611, which runs Kajaki Sofla, an area that had long been a safe haven for insurgent sub-commanders and for arms and drug trafficking. (Cpl. James Clark/USMC)

0
Your rating: None

The New Year began violently in Afghanistan, with three bombings killing 13 people in one day in Kandahar. In addition, the French Defense minister told soldiers he backed US efforts to open peace talks with the Taliban, and President Obama was in talks about defense priorites as the US military readied for challenges from China and Iran while downplaying any future counterinsurgency efforts like the ones in Afghanistan or Iraq. Meanwhile, the foreign troop withdrawal process continued, as more responsibility was transferred to Afghan security forces. The goal is a complete withdrawal by the end of 2014. -- Lloyd Young (41 photos total)
Afghan policemen march during the transfer of authority from NATO troops to Afghan security forces in Chaghcharan, Ghor province, west of Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan. 4. The security responsibilities of Chaghcharan, the provincial capital of Ghor province is handed over from the NATO forces to Afghan security forces. The process of taking over security from over 130,000-strong NATO-led ISAF forces by Afghan troops would be completed by the end of 2014 when Afghanistan will take over the full leadership of its own security duties from US and NATO forces. (Hoshang Hashimi/Associated Press)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

In the year 2011, a total of 565 NATO forces stationed in Afghanistan were killed -- down from 711 in 2010 -- marking the largest decline in annual deaths during the decade-long conflict. The large number of NATO soldiers on the ground appears to have made a difference, a fact that worries Afghans as the U.S. and others accelerate their planned pullback. This year, 23,000 U.S. soldiers are scheduled to depart the country, heading toward a full withdrawal by 2014. For now, U.S. troops appear to be focusing on intensive training of Afghan forces and preparing for the logistical challenge of shipping home some $30 billion worth of military gear. Gathered here are images of the people and places involved in this conflict over the past month, as part of an ongoing monthly series on Afghanistan. [42 photos]

Cpl. James Hernandez, a combat engineer with Alpha Company, 9th Engineer Support Battalion, and a native of Goodyear, Arizona, uses an electric saw to dismantle a HESCO barrier at Firebase Saenz, in Helmand province, on December 13, 2011. FB Saenz is the first of several patrol bases being demilitarized by the Marines of 9th ESB throughout the month of December. (USMC/Cpl. Bryan Nygaard)

0
Your rating: None

With the crashes of the first half of the race behind him, Cadel Evans finally ascended to the top step of the Tour de France podium after winning the 2011 edition. Evans had twice finished second. It was a tour of firsts. Evans became the first Australian to win the world's most prestigious bike race, and the brothers Schleck, Andy and Frank, became the first siblings to share the podium, taking second and third, respectively. In an electrifying tour, Evans pulled out the win on the second to last day in the individual time trial, soundly beating both Schlecks to win the three-week race by over a minute and a half. A plucky Frenchman, Thomas Voeckler, had given French fans hope for ten days as he tenaciously clung to the overall lead, only to finally succumb on the grueling climbs of the Alps. He finished fourth overall. Defending champion Alberto Contador, perhaps weakened by his May victory in the exhausting three-week Tour of Italy, or Giro d'Italia, could do no better than fifth. Through it all, the beauty of France shone through. The Big Picture offers special thanks to Veeral Patel for making his photographs available. -- Lane Turner (34 photos total)
Australia's Cadel Evans (center) celebrates with BMC teammates on the Champs-Elysees after he won the 2011 Tour de France cycling race on July 24, 2011. (Pascal Pavani/AFP/Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

The world's most beautiful stadium - the entire country of France - annually hosts the most important bike race of the year: the Tour de France. Upwards of 12 million fans line the roads to watch the race. For free. No tickets needed. The race traverses over 2000 miles in 21 days of racing. Every year the route changes, but the mountains are a constant: racers must scale absurdly steep peaks in both the Pyrenees and the Alps before a victory race onto the Champs Elysees in Paris. This year's tour may be remembered most for the spate of horrible crashes that have eliminated many of the top riders. Most outrageously, a media car hit a cyclist at speed, causing a horrific crash that sent another rider cartwheeling into a barbed-wire fence. Both riders remounted and finished the stage. The race goes on through July 24. -- Lane Turner (35 photos total)
The peloton rides past the rocky tidal island of Mont Saint-Michel in the 226.5 km sixth stage of the 2011 Tour de France cycling race run between Dinan and Lisieux in northwestern France on July 7, 2011. (Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

WAITING FOR FOOD
WAITING FOR FOOD: Women lined up to receive food being distributed in a camp for internally displaced people in the southern Sudan village of Mayan Abun Thursday. Tens of thousands of southern Sudanese fled heavy fighting in the hotly contested border area of Abyei earlier this week. (Pete Muller/Associated Press)

FORMER FUGITIVE
FORMER FUGITIVE: A boy walked past graffiti showing Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb general accused of directing the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of some 8,000 Muslim men, in Serbia Thursday. Gen. Mladic was captured Thursday after a decade and a half on the run from an indictment for genocide. (Andrej Cukic/Associated Press)

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING: Angie Elbert looked for items to salvage Thursday from her grandmother’s house in Joplin, Mo., which was destroyed when a massive tornado passed through the town Sunday, killing at least 125 people. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

ARMS OUTSTRETCHED
ARMS OUTSTRETCHED: Kashmiri Muslims raised their hands as a head priest, unseen, displayed a relic believed to be a hair from the beard of the Prophet Mohammad, during special prayers Thursday at a shrine on the outskirts of Srinagar, India, on the anniversary of the death of Abu Bakr Siddiq, the first Caliph of Islam. (Dar Yasin/Associated Press)

COVERED OVER
COVERED OVER: Volcanic ash from the eruption of the Grimsvötn volcano near Vik, Iceland, covered thick moss Thursday. Earlier in the week, ash clouds forced airport closures and hundreds of flight cancellations in Britain, Germany and elsewhere in northwestern Europe. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

PLANE CRASH
PLANE CRASH: The wreckage of a small chartered plane lay on the roof of a building in Faridabad, India, Thursday. The plane was being used to ferry a patient to a New Delhi hospital when it crashed Wednesday in a residential neighborhood, killing 10 people, government officials said. (Zuma Press)

OUCH
OUCH: The Florida Marlins’ Scott Cousins, top, collided with San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey (in white) on a fly ball from Emilio Bonifacio during the 12th inning of a baseball game in San Francisco Wednesday. Cousins was safe for the go-ahead run, and Florida won 7-6. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press)

TAKING A REST
TAKING A REST: A man slept in Puerta del Sol square in Madrid Thursday during a demonstration against Spain’s economic crisis and high jobless rate. (Pedro Armestre/AFP/Getty Images)


UP IN THE STANDS! Cricket fans dressed in superhero outfits drank as rain delayed the start of play on the first day of the first Test cricket match between England and Sri Lanka at the Swalec Stadium in Cardiff, Wales, Thursday. (Ian Kingston/AFP/Getty Images)

CHICKENS COME FIRST
CHICKENS COME FIRST: A man unloaded live chickens from a truck at a wholesale poultry market in Mumbai Thursday. Food inflation in India accelerated in the week ended May 14, diminishing hopes of any near-term relief for consumers from red-hot prices and raising pressure on the central bank. (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters)

WHERE THERE WAS WATER
WHERE THERE WAS WATER: A man walked Thursday on a river shoal that appeared after the water level of the Yangtze River dropped, near Wuhan, China. China’s worst drought in a half-century is deepening, with millions in the Yangtze River region without enough drinking water. (Reuters)

G-8 SUMMIT
G-8 SUMMIT: French police forces stood guard on the beach in Deauville, France, Thursday during the Group of Eight summit. G-8 leaders expressed confidence in the rebounding global economy and said they were working on an ambitious aid program for “Arab Spring” countries. (Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

BORDER CROSSING
BORDER CROSSING: A Palestinian woman waited to cross into Egypt through the Rafah border terminal in the southern Gaza Strip Thursday. Egypt’s caretaker government said it will permanently open its border with the Gaza Strip on Saturday. (Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images)

REUSE AND RECYCLE
REUSE AND RECYCLE: A boy collected recyclable material from mounds of uncollected trash that have been a major cause of flooding during the rainy season at a riverside community in Quezon City, Philippines, Thursday. (Rolex Dela Pena/European Pressphoto Agency)

FISH FILES
FISH FILES: A worker arranged fish for sale at the Baho market in Yangon, Myanmar, Thursday. (Khin Maung Win/Associated Press)

APPLE BASKETS
APPLE BASKETS: A vendor loaded baskets of apples onto a truck at a wholesale market in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China, Thursday. (Sean Yong/Reuters)

0
Your rating: None

For more than a month, refugees have been fleeing the violence and uncertainty of Libya into Tunisia. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees has reported nearly 180,000 people have fled -- a rate of 2,000 a day. Most end up at border transit camps, desperately trying to find a way home. Here are the faces of a few of them. -- Lloyd Young
(39 photos total)
A Sudanese migrant fleeing the unrest in Libya holds her child as she walks at the Tunisian border crossing of Ras Jdir on March 2. (Zohra Bensemra/Reuters)(credit)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

SUITED UP
SUITED UP: The crew of a nuclear submarine participated in a drill in Murmansk, Russia, Friday. (Russian Look/Zuma Press)

PROTESTING IN PAKISTAN
PROTESTING IN PAKISTAN: Members of the Tehreek-e-Insaaf and Jamaat-e-Islami parties clashed with police Friday in Islamabad, Pakistan, as they protested against U.S. drone strikes and the release of CIA contractor Raymond Davis after he said he shot two men in self-defense. (Aamir Qureshi/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

MAN ON FIRE
MAN ON FIRE: An Israeli border police officer was engulfed by flames after a Molotov cocktail was thrown at him during clashes in the mostly Arab neighborhood of Silwan, East Jerusalem, Friday. Officials said the officer was only ‘slightly’ injured, but was taken to a hospital. (Ammar Awad/Reuters)

BAGS OF BONES
BAGS OF BONES: Workers bagged bones that were found in a mine in Gwanda, Zimbabwe, Tuesday. Local media reported that mass graves possibly containing thousands of bodies were found at the mine. (Zuma Press)

IN TRANSIT
IN TRANSIT: Ghanaians sat near garbage at a camp after leaving Libya, where pro-Gadhafi forces continued to shell Ajdabiya and Misrata, despite declaring a cease-fire Friday. (Joel Saget/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

BACK HOME
BACK HOME: Former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returned home Friday to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, after spending seven years in exile. Mr. Aristide immediately took a swipe at the decision to bar his political party from the country’s presidential election. (Alexandre Meneghini/Associated Press)

0
Your rating: None