Skip navigation
Help

Kate Moss

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Megan Gibson

Many artists perceive power in movement. Photographer and visual artist Chris Levine seeks to illuminate the power inherent in stillness.

His larger-than-life subjects — which include Queen Elizabeth II and singer Grace Jones — might be among the most photographed people in the world, but Levine has a knack for capturing them at rest, as if in the calm of a storm. “Every opportunity I got [to shoot a portrait], I tried to distill it back to just pure essence without any suggestion or iconography or anything,” he told TIME during a recent visit to his studio in Oxfordshire, England, ahead of his solo retrospective show at The Fine Art Society on May 17. “I’m experimenting with that and trying to get stillness in the image.”

He says the challenge as a photographer is to distance himself from the idea of his subject  and focus on the person he has right in front of his lens. In a recent sitting with Kate Moss, Levine says he was determined to ignore Kate Moss, the supermodel, and instead tried “to bring her back, just to Kate – Kate, Kate, Kate.” In doing this, he manages to take one of the fashion world’s most recognizable faces and show it in a new light.

Which may explain why an artist who largely focuses on lights, lasers and holography — as Levine has done since his student days at London’s Chelsea School of Art; his light installations will be included in the retrospective at The Fine Art Society — has made a name for himself in recent years for his portraits. The Canadian-born Brit, now 41, says that he never expected to be shooting icons at this stage in his career. In fact, back in 2004, when he received a call from Buckingham Palace asking him to shoot a portrait of the Queen, Levine initially thought it was a prank. “I thought it was a hoax at first! Seriously, I really did. It just seemed so far-fetched.”

Once Levine was sufficiently convinced that it was not a ruse but a Royal request, he went to work preparing lights and equipment, wanting to put his knowledge of light and holography to use capturing the monarch in a truly modern fashion. Setting up the visual light equipment in Buckingham Palace took Levine about three days – “and it took every second,” he recalls – and the shoot itself took about an hour and a half. However, the resulting images, including Lightness of Being as well as the shot selected for TIME’s cover on the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012, are arresting and timeless.

“I think [these images] struck such a chord because it’s going somewhere into a more spiritual dimension and into a deeper realm,” he says. ”It’s what we are but people don’t very often connect with it.”

Chris Levine: Light 3.142 is on display from May 17 to June 15, 2013 at The Fine Art Society in London.

Chris Levine is a Canadian born light artist based in the United Kingdom.

Megan Gibson is a writer and reporter at the London bureau of TIME. Find her on Twitter at @MeganJGibson.

0
Your rating: None

When British painter Lucian Freud died in July 2011, TIME’s art critic Richard Lacayo wrote that Freud “proved with a bang the continuing vitality of the figurative tradition in art.” A prodigious realist painter, who many considered one of the greatest British artists of his generation, Freud began his career using sharp, tight lines. In the 1950s, he set aside his thin brushes for thicker, hog’s-bristle brushes that Lacayo wrote “pushed pigment across the canvas in rich, thick flourishes.”

Freud painted dozens of nudes and loved subjects with copious amounts of flesh. He took long periods to complete portraits and required his subjects to commit incredible amounts of time to the process. In 2007, the Telegraph chronicled Freud’s painting of art handler Rita Kirby, a process that took 16 months and required Kirby to pose for him seven nights a week on top of her day job.

A new exhibition at London’s Pallant House Gallery features photographs by David Dawson, who was Freud’s model and studio assistant for 20 years. The show features some of Freud’s key paintings alongside Dawson’s photographs of the artist at work in his studio. In addition to photographs of the painting process, Dawson captured intimate moments of Freud’s life, including the application of shaving cream with one of his large brushes and cuddling Kate Moss in bed.

What emerges is a portrait of an artist who took painstaking care to capture intimate details in his paintings where the point of completion was different for each one. “Freud’s criterion is that he feels he’s finished when he gets the impression he’s working on somebody else’s painting,” Martin Gayford wrote in the Telegraph in 2007. Freud often looked inward. His 2005 self-portrait—one of many he did in his lifetime—is one of his most recognized paintings. But perhaps the most complete portrait of Freud will emerge after his death in pictures from Dawson’s lens, instead of the artist’s brush.

David Dawson: Working with Lucian Freud is on view at the Pallant House Gallery through May 20. An exhibition of photographs by David Dawson will be available for sale at Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert through March 2.

Nate Rawlings is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @naterawlings

0
Your rating: None


Meryl Streep, 1990


Meryl Streep, 1984


Meryl Streep and Robert DeNiro, "Falling In Love", New York, NY, 1984


Meryl Streep and William Styron, "Sophies Choice", New York, NY, 1983


Meryl Streep, 1993


Kate Winslet, "Mildred Pierce", Brooklyn, NY, 2010


Martin Scorsese, "Hugo", London, England, 2010


Johnny Depp, Los Angeles, CA, 2009


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Sam Worthington on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Javier Bardem, Toronto, ON, 2007


Michael Fassbender, 2011


Kate Winslet and Ann Roth, "Mildred Pierce", Brooklyn, NY, 2010


Laura Linney, "The Big C", Stamford, CT, 2010


"Shutter Island", Boston, MA, 2008


"Nine", Cinecitta, Rome, Italy, 2009


Penelope Cruz and Daniel Day-Lewis, "Nine", Cinecitta, Rome, Italy, 2009


Tilda Swinton, New York, NY, 2009


Rachel Weisz, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Salma Hayek, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Woody Harrelson and Robin Wright, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Bennett Miller, Jonah Hill, Chris Pratt, & Brad Pitt, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Isabella Rossellini and Elettra Wiedemann, New York Magazine, August 22, 2011


Jude Law and Matt Damon


Paris


Jordan


Cuba


Senegal


Keira Knightley


Liev Schreiber, New York, NY, 2009


Sacha Baron Cohen and Martin Scorsese, "Hugo", London, England, 2010


Jude Law and Robert Downey Jr., "Sherlock Holmes", Brooklyn, NY, 2009


Audrey Tatou, "Coco Avant Chanel", Paris, France, 2008


Kara Walker, Brooklyn , NY, 2008


Bob Dylan


Nina Chanel Abney, New York, NY, 2009


Donna Karan, New York, NY, 2009


Maya Angelou, Winsten-Salem, NC, 2009


Twiggy and Kate Moss, London, UK, 1999

0
Your rating: None

This SlideShowPro photo gallery requires the Flash Player plugin and a web browser with JavaScript enabled.

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

Gabrielle Revere

Karlie Kloss – Inside Her Life, For LIFE Magazine Special Issue

play this essay

 

Joining the ranks of iconic fashion models Veruschka, Suzy Parker & Naomi Sims, Karlie Kloss appears on the cover of LIFE magazine in a special printed issue in celebration of New York Fashion Week, as photographed by Gabrielle Revere. Revere went on a whirlwind journey with the leggy stunner to capture the fleeting and intimate moments from her suburban St. Louis home to the Haute Couture shows in Paris.

 

Bio

Revere’s solo exhibitions at preeminent galleries include: Sotheby’s, New York – “I Remain, You Desire”, and Milk Gallery, New York – “I Only Have Eyes For You”. She also participated in several group shows, with her photographs gracing the walls alongside works by Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Damien Hirst.

Most recently, Revere appeared as a guest judge and featured photographer on Australia’s Next Top Model. She has also been profiled by FTV Fashion Television, and featured on E! News Entertainment Television.

 

Related links

Gabrielle Revere

0
Your rating: None

Olivia Bee

Converse, 2009

At 11, Olivia Bolles started shooting when she was enrolled in a photography class by accident. Now 17, the precocious Portland-based photographer’s portraits of teen life have appeared in campaigns for Nike and Converse, as well as American Photo magazine. Bolles—who goes by Olivia Bee professionally—spoke to fellow teen, Style Rookie fashion blogger Tavi Gevinson, to talk about her images and inspirations.

TG: Who are your influences?

OB: For the most part, my muse is everyday life. It’s kind of like enjoying where you’re at and appreciating what’s going on around you. Photographically, Ryan McGinley is my favorite. [Also,] Annie Leibovitz, Nan Goldin.

TG: Something about your photos I really like is [that] they feel really intimate. You feel like you’re getting to learn about this person and her life, but at the same time, a lot of them capture more universal experiences about everyday life as a teenager. Do you think about whether a photo [will be] more diary-like or more about being a teenager in general?

OB: I think it’s both. My photos are my diary. But a lot of the things I photograph I’m sure happen to other people too. That specific moment happened in my life, but other moments like it happened in other people’s lives. So it’s a diary but it’s kind of relatable, and that’s what I want to be doing with my work.

TG: Yeah, and I think that’s one thing I like most about your work—that you’re independent and unedited.

OB: Yeah, it’s all honest, you know? That’s the important part for me, being honest about everything.

TG: It can be so mind-blowing seeing someone’s earlier work, or freshman year versus senior year. Do you ever feel embarrassed?

OB: (Laughs.) Totally. There are some things where I’m like, “Oh my god, what the hell was I thinking?” I look back at my old Flickr, and that’s the stuff that gets on Tumblr like every day. I’m like, “I hate this picture. Why are people hyping over this?” But then I think this is a fortunate thing. I hate it now, but it had to happen to get where I am now.

TG: How do you think that being in Portland affects they way you think about your work or what you end up photographing?

OB: I definitely think it affects me a lot, because in Portland it rains all the time. So everybody plays an instrument, and is in a band and working on a project. Being in a creative atmosphere 24/7 just encourages me to make something every day. And my friends are my muses. Being in Portland is awesome (laughs). It’s such a warm, friendly atmosphere, but it’s really real.

TG: Are there any movies that inspire you?

OB: I’m like every other girl, and I like The Virgin Suicides. There’s this movie Wonderwall. George Harrison did the soundtrack to it. It’s like a really bad 60’s movie, but it’s really beautiful visually. Anything ’60s or ’70s—The Partridge Family. But Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is also a gorgeous movie.

TG: Who are the other young photographers you like?

OB: I love El Hardwick, Francesca Allen … There’s so many people on Flickr, it’s ridiculous. Chrissie White, Maggie Lochtenberg. Oh, and Lauren Poor. And Mike Bailey Gates, obviously, Erica Segovia.

TG: It’s great that with the Internet, there has come this sense of creative independence. Having your stuff online—some people think of it as gimmicky, but in a way, it’s one of the most pure forms of having your work judged.

OB: Because so many people can see it, you know? It’s the only thing that makes sense in 2011. You can have shows or whatever, but that’s going to be seen by like 50 people, or a hundred or a thousand or whatever. But if you put your stuff on the Internet, millions of people can see it.

TG: Do you ever want to balance out this public content? Do you keep anything just for yourself, or just for a show?

OB: There are a lot of photos that are so intimate to me that I don’t want to show other people. Someday when I make a book, I’ll put in all these pictures that I’ve kept secret. And some of them are my favorite photos, but I just don’t think they should be public, because they’re so special to me.

TG: Can you fill in your readers on some of that commercial work you’ve done?

OB: I just finished shooting the Fiat 500 campaign in April. And then I did some Degrassi stuff for TeenNick—production stills. I shot Nike and Converse, Zeit Magazin, which is like the German New York Times. Yeah, that was cool. I got to shoot the cover for that. And then I did the FOAM International Photography Museum magazine; I just did their cover and a feature. I have a really big editorial coming up, but I obviously can’t talk about it in this. 2011 has been a good year to me.

TG: Do you find that when you’re with a crew of people, that your age seems to factor into how they work with you, or talk to you?

OB: When I’ve shot alongside other photographers, sometimes people really look down on me…Sometimes people will be like “What the hell is she doing on this set?” But when you get to know people, [they] kind of become my mentors. It all depends on how long I’ve worked with someone. But it’s still weird (laughs); I’m still 17.

TG: I could definitely see being shot by you as the foray a Dakota Fanning-type would take to being, like, a cool teenager. If you could put together a photo shoot that wasn’t just the things you see every day, what would your dream setting be?

OB: It’d be on the moon cause that’d be so amazing! But I don’t know who my models would be. I like shooting anybody, so the models wouldn’t really be specific. But if it was on, like, the moon—that would be killer.

TG: Where would you like to go with your skills?

OB: Honestly, I just don’t want to stop. I’ve been happy with the kind of commercial stuff I’m doing. I don’t want to stop making personal work. I’m just going to photograph my life all the time, because that’s what I really like doing. As I grow older, I’m sure my pictures will change, but that’s basically what I want to keep doing. I’d love to shoot AnnaSophia Robb; I think she’s just gorgeous. And I’d like to shoot Dakota Fanning or Kate Moss, or someone like that—that’d be fun. Or shoot bands. If I got to shoot The Strokes, I’d basically die.

Seventeen-year-old Olivia Bolles, who goes by the name Olivia Bee, lives in Portland, Oregon and has worked for clients including Nike, Converse, Fiat, and TeenNick, among others. She is represented by Candace Gelman. More of her work can be seen here.

Fifteen-year-old Tavi Gevinson lives in the Chicago, Illinois area and has run the fashion blog The Style Rookie since 2008.

0
Your rating: None

Features and Essays

The end game in Libya…Bryan Denton has been in the country for most of the last six months covering the events for the New York Times…NYT Lens interviewed him as rebels were pushing towards Tripoli end of last week…

Bryan Denton: Tomorrow Tripoli (NYT Lens: August 2011)

New York Times’ The Battle for Libya gallery … impressive selection from February onwards.

Libya galleries from TIME, NPR, The Atlantic’s In Focus, The Foreign Policy, and Wall Street Journal…

TIME: Libyan Rebels Move on Tripoli 

NPR: The Story Of Libya’s Revolt, In Pictures 

The Atlantic In Focus blog: Qaddafi Losing Grip on Libya

The Foreign Policy: Triumph in Tripoli 

WSJ: Libya’s Revolution

Moises Saman captured the mood in Tripoli just before the rebel push…

Moises Saman: Gaddafi Defiant (Magnum: August 2011)

Maybe a good time to recap on some of the events in the Middle East this year,  by looking at this TIME video of Yuri Kozyrev’s work from Yemen, Egypt, Bahrain, and Libya again…also as Visa Pour l’Image is just around the corner… and the festival will showcase some of the work…

Yuri Kozyrev: On Revolution Road (TIME: June 2011)

Moving on from Libya to other things…

New York Times Magazine did something special with their What They Were Thinking last weekend…

NYT Magazine: Classic Magazine Photographs, Then and Now (NYT Mag: August 2011) “What they were thinking then. What are they thinking now.”

From National Geographic Magazine’s September issue…

Brent Stirton: The Sahara’s Tuareg (NGM: September 2011)

John Stanmeyer: Brazil’s Girl Power (NGM: September 2011)

Michael ‘Nick’ Nichol: Orphan Elephants (NGM: September 2011)

New on VII website…

Giulio Di Sturco: Somali Famine (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Erin Trieb: The Homecoming (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Sim Chi Yin: China’s Lead Curse (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Venetia Dearden: Mariinsky Ballet (VII Network: August 2011)

Lynsey Addario: Saudi Life (VII Network: August 2011)

From VII Magazine…

Antonin Kratochvil: Incognito (VII Magazine: August 2011)

Giulio di Sturco: Doolow Somalia (VII Mag: August 2011)

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul’s Movie Theaters (Reportage by Getty Images: August 2011)

Moises Saman: Syria, Decisively Seen (TIME LB: August 2011)

William Daniels: Revisiting Japan’s Ground Zero (TIME LB: August 2011)

Jake Price: Japan, Five Months On (BNN: August 2011)

Daniel Berehulak: Pakistan: One Year Later (Newsweek: August 2011)

Abbas: Sources of the Ganges (Magnum: August 2011)

Samuel James: In Nigeria, an Islamist Insurgency Strengthens (NYT: August 2011)

Bruce Davidson: NYC Subway Commuters in the 80s (Flavorwire: 2011)

Taslima Akhter: Garment Workers in Bangladesh (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Marcus Bleasdale: Ripe With Abuse (HRW: August 2011)

Jehad Nga: Dadaab (New Yorker: August 2011)

Peter Greste: Somalis Flee to Ethiopia (Al Jazeera: August 2011)

Davin Ellicson: Postcard from Bucharest: After the Revolution (New Yorker Photo Booth: August 2011)

Carlos Saveedra: Daughters of the Goddess Huitaca (Foto8: August 2011)

Alizandra Fazzina: Paper Mill 2 (NOOR: August 2011)

9/11…VII newsletter about the upcoming tenth anniversary with links to features…

VII: 911 Tenth Anniversary (VII: August 2011)

911 with Holgas and Lomos..New trend developing? First Tama/Getty and now Stapleton/Reuters…compare here

Shannon Stapleton: A Different View of 911 (Reuters: August 2011)

Michal Chelbin: Prison Portraits (New Yorker: August 2011)

Brian Shumway: True Men (burn: August 2011)

Anthony Suau: Turmoil on Wall Street (Facing Change: August 2011)

Andrew Moore: Love in Detroit’s Ruins (NYT: August 2011)

Piotr Malecki: Call Centre (Panos: August 2011)

Seamus Murphy: London Riots (Stern: August 2011)

Ryan Gauvin: Shots Out the Rough (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Julio Bittencourt: Big Pool of Ramon (TIME LB: August 2011)

Evan Vucci: Killer Blue- Baptized by Fire (Photographer’s Vimeo:2011)

Evan Vucci: We Don’t Have Enough Power to Fight (Photographer’s Vimeo: 2011)

Thomas Hoepker: Berlin Vintage (Guardian: August 2011)

Stephen Dupont: Generation AK (Vimeo: 2011)

Stephen Shames: Bronx Boys (TIME LB: August 2011)

Sarina Finkelstein: Modern Day Gold Prospectors (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Rodrigo Abd: Mayan Women (Oregonian: 2011)

Articles 

Guardian: Sean Smith’s Best Shot (Guardian: August 2011)

Assignment Chicago: 7 Lies About Photojournalists (Chicago Tribune: August 2011)

TIME LB: John Moore’s story behind the photo : Somalia, One Mother’s Unspeakable Loss (TIME LB: August 2011)

David Campbell: Imaging famine: How critique can help (DC blog: August 2011)

Visual Culture Blog: Defacing Gaddafi (Visual Culture Blog: August 2011)

PDN: Judge Dismisses Copyright Suit Against Ryan McGinley as “Wasteful” (PDN: August 2011)

Lisa Pritchard: Ask An Agent 2 (LPA blog: August 2011)

photo: Massimo Vitali

New York Times Mag: A View From the High (NYT Mag: August 2011) Massimo Vitali

Telegraph: Lomography: the digital photo sceptics strike back (Telegraph: August 2011)

Telegraph: Instagram, Hipstamatic and the mobile photography movement (Telegraph: August 2011)

BJP: Corbis signs deal with Associated Press

BJP: BBC’s Twitter statement is “unacceptable”, says NUJ

Nowness: Corinne Day : Heaven is Real (Nowness: August 2011)

BJP: Award-winning war documentary comes to the UK

photo: Paolo Patrizi

Prison Photography: Photographing the Prostitutes of Italy’s Backroads: Google Street View vs. Boots on the Ground (Prison Photography: August 2011)

Related..

Conscientious: Google Street View and Authorship (Conscientious: August 2011)

MSNBC: At 83, subject of ‘American Girl in Italy’ photo speaks out (MSNBC: August 2011)

NPR: In Japan, Restoring Photos For Tsunami Victims (NPR: August 2011)

PDN: Lee Miller: Great Conflict Photographer, Not So Great Parent (PDN: August 2011)

Carol Guzy: Losing Miss Cassie (Washington Post: 2010)

Events

If you happen to be in Scotland this coming weekend…Some great events and talks happening as part of the Festival of Politics…World Press Photo exhibition and Anastasia Taylor-Lind showing some  of her work and participating in another talk…

Festival of Politics:  Raised by Women: A Photographic Essay on Female Dominated Communities : Anastasia Taylor Lind : Where: Scottish Parliament : Edinburgh : Saturday 27 August, 11:00 – 12:00, Committee Room 3, FREE Chaired by Olivier Laurent, News and Online Editor, British Journal of Photography. Also: Covering Conflict: the role of the photographer and artist : Saturday 27 August, 17:30 – 18:30, Committee Room 3, FREE

Magnum in Motion, Live : NYC (TIME LB)

Crowd Funding - Focused (IndieGoGo)

Interviews and Talks

David Campbell and Jon Levy : ”Aesthetics have no place in photographing famine” (OPEN-i Vimeo: August 2011)

Peter Dench (Telegraph: August 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson (PRX: August 2011)

Don McCullin (TateShots on Youtube: August 2011)

Steve Pyke (Hungry Eye: August 2011)

Ben Lowy (Conscientious: August 2011)

Leonie Hampton (Ideas Tap: August 2011)

Shannon Stapleton (Reuters: August 2011)

Yannis Behrakis (Reuters: August 2011)

Brassai (ASX)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Samuel James

Exposure Alexandra Boulat Award for Photojournalism : inaugural winner Samuel James. Work ‘Lagos, Area‘ syndicated by VII

Lens Culture Awards includes, documentary, fine art, abstract, and photojournalism. Deadline Sept.17

Ian Parry Scholarship Private view (Olivier Laurent’s Vimeo: August 2011)

Movies and Videos

The Mexican Suitcase

Paul Strand : Under the Dark Cloth (Youtube)

Hungry Eye TV

Agencies

Anne Bourgeois-Vignon joins INSTITUTE as Director of INSTITUTE | news on BJP

Falcon

Photographers

Justin Maxon

Rian Dundon

Angelos Giotopoulos

Stephanie Foden

Jobs

MSF Canada

Video Producer/Editor for msnbc.com in NYC

Whitechapel Gallery are hiring a Schools & Families Education Curator

To finish off…

From Gawker…Experience an Entire Day in New York in One Photograph…Very entertaining photos by Stephen Wilkes

Photoshop horrors….

Either Testino retouchers photochopped Kate Moss’ daughter’s fingers on purpose or someone fucked up bad…

Also…

This timelapse video of a day in California is worth checking out too..

See also Little People

0
Your rating: None


The Hand of Miles Davis


Georgia O'Keeffe, Gypsy Rose Lee


Ballet Society, 1948


Truman Capote, Spencer Tracy


Joe Louis


Duchess of Windsor, Mrs. William Rhinelander Stewart


Marlene Dietrich


Igor Stravinsky, Marcel Duchamp


Jean Cocteau


Al Pacino


John F. Kennedy


Ingmar Bergman


Truman Capote


Louise Bourgeois


Kate Moss


Simone de Beauvoir


Amber Valletta


Ingmar Bergman


Audrey Hepburn


Alfred Hitchcock


Giorgio de Chirico


Dorian Leigh and Maurice Tillet


Maurice Tillet


Eugene Ionesco


Marlene Dietrich


Jacob and Gwen Lawrence


Rudolf Nureyev


Raymone and Blaise Cendrars


Doug, Hells Angels (San Francisco), 1967

0
Your rating: None