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Leon Neal

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For well over a hundred years, people have hopped on bicycles for transportation, recreation, competition, and more. In many parts of the world, spinning pedals moves goods and generates electricity. While usually attached to two wheels, pedal power takes many forms, adapting to a wide range of needs. Globally, over 100 million bicycles are produced every year - over 60% of them in China - easily doubling world production of automobiles. Efficient, clean, and cheap, pedal power in all its forms can solve modern problems with basic technology, and offers a health benefit to those cranking away. And it's hard to beat the simple joy of riding a bike. Gathered here are images of people around the world as we pedal for a reason, or just because. -- Lane Turner (49 photos total)
A boy rides his bicycle near rice fields in Bago, Myanmar on February 20, 2012. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

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WORKER WRITHES
WORKER WRITHES: A Palestinian construction worker screamed in pain after an Israeli soldier drove a trailer hooked to a tractor over his legs near Yatta, West Bank, Wednesday. Israeli forces seized equipment because they said the workers were building in an unauthorized area. (Hazem Bader/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

A BIG SAND TRAP
A BIG SAND TRAP: England’s Luke Donald played in Liwa Desert during a promotional event in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Tuesday, two days before the start of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship. (Andrew Redington/Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship /European Pressphoto Agency)

CARRYING ON
CARRYING ON: Protesters carried an obelisk, bearing the names of Egyptians killed during an uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak in 2011, as they marked the one-year anniversary of the uprising with a rally in Cairo’s Tahrir Square Wednesday. (Mahmud Hams/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

NIMBLE SKATER
NIMBLE SKATER: Alexandra Herbrikova and Leri Kenchadze performed during the ISU European Figure Skating Championships at the Motorpoint Arena in Sheffield, England, Wednesday. (Leon Neal/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)


UNIMPRESSED? House Majority Whip Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R., Calif.), left, and House Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor (R., Va.) watched as President Barack Obama delivered his State of the Union address in Washington Tuesday. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

CAMPAIGN EVENT
CAMPAIGN EVENT: Carmen Hilburn and Alejandro Jimenz listened to Republican presidential candidate and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich speak during a Latin American policy event at Florida International University in Miami Wednesday. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

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It's time once more for a look into the animal kingdom and our interactions with the countless other species that share our planet. Today's photos include a fiery Spanish festival, a frightening encounter with a leopard in India, a flamingo undergoing laser treatment, a new species named in honor of entertainer Beyonce, and the plight of Ukraine's "vodka bears". These images and many others are part of this roundup of animals in the news from recent weeks, seen from the perspectives of their human observers, companions, captors, and caretakers. [42 photos]

A man rides a horse through a bonfire on January 16, 2012 in the small village of San Bartolome de Pinares, Spain. In honor of San Anton, the patron saint of animals, horses are ridden through the bonfires on the night before the official day of honoring animals in Spain. (Jasper Juinen/Getty Images)

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The United Nations estimates that in one week, on October 31, 2011, the world's population will reach 7 billion. Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the world's population has more than doubled, and it is projected to grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the UN points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges. Meeting the basic needs of so many will meaning growing, shipping, and distributing more food while providing more clean water, health care, and shelter -- all without inflicting too much further damage on our environment. [42 photos]

A baby gestures minutes after he was born inside the pediatric unit at hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on October 21, 2011. According to Honduras' health authorities, about 220,000 babies are born in Honduras each year and the cost of having a baby delivered at the public hospital is $10. (Reuters/Edgard Garrido)

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Features and Essays 

From Newsweek, or should I say Daily Beast….Russia’s far-right groups on the rise…photos by TIME contract photographer Yuri Kozyrev…

Yuri Kozyrev: Russian Hate (Newsweek: August 2011)

John Moore: Somalia (Life.com: August 2011)

Todd Heisler’s been keeping busy…He too has been to Somalia…

Todd Heisler: Waging War in Somalia, a Country in Chaos (NYT: August 2011)

But also Norway…Do listen to his comments also…

Todd Heisler: Loss and Healing in Norway (NYT: August 2011)

More on Somalia crisis…

Sven Torfinn: Somali refugee camps in Kenya (Guardian: August 2011)

Brendan Bannon: Dadaab Refugee Camp (Boston Globe Big Picture: August 2011)

Francisco Zizola: Northern Kenya (MSNBC: August 2011) Zizola’s comments

Libya…

Francesco Giusti: In Case of Loss (TIME: July 2011) Giusti’s site

New York Times: Battle of Libya gallery

Paul Moakley: An All-Boys Roman Catholic School on Staten Island (NYT Lens: August 2011) Moakley’s site

Maureen Drennan: On a California Farm Where Marijuana  (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Irving Penn: Radical Beauty (TIME LB: August 2011)

Katie Orlinsky: Mexico’s Drug War, Feminized (NYT: August 2011)

Murray Ballard: Frozen in Time (BBC: August 2011)

Teun Voeten: Narco Estado (Magnum Emergency Fund: 2011) Juarez, Mexico

Stephanie Sinclair: Bihar State India (Phaidon blog: August 2011)

Thomas Hoepker: Views of a Vanished Country (TIME LB: August 2011)

Ernst Haas: Color Corrections (TIME LB: August 2011)

Mustafah Abdulaziz: On the Road, Embracing the Distance (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Lauren Lancaster: UAE (New Yorker: August 2011)

George Steinmetz: Picturing the American Drought (TIME LB: August 2011)

Sylvia Plachy: The Pageant Winner (NYT Mag: August 2011)

Matt Lutton: Balkanization (PDN Photo of the Day: August 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Working for a Family Far Away (NOOR: August 2011)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Britain’s Discontent (New Yorker: August 2011)

Ed Smith: On These Isles (Photographer’s website: August 2011)

Gethyn Rees: Business on Migingo (Foto8: August 2011)

Lucy Clemence and Darren Karl-Smith: Anarchy in the UK (Purple.fr: 2011)

Maggie Steber: Madje has Dementia (AARP.org: August 2008) via @wemarijnissen

Interviews

Elliott Erwitt (NPR: August 2011)

Paolo Pellegrin (Wayne Ford Posterous: August 2011)

Martin Parr (Vignette Magazine: August 2011)

Bruce Gilden (Viceland: 2011)

Danny Lyon (northernarizonanews: February 2011)

Amanda Rivkin (NG radio: August 2011)

Jonathan Worth (Hungry Eye: August 2011)

Jussi Leinonen (NYT Lens: August 2011) Leinonen’s site

Articles 

photo: Anastasia Taylor-Lind

Guardian: The month in photography (Guardian: August 2011)

Guardian: Luc Delahaye turns war photography into an uncomfortable art (Guardian: August 2011)

Leon Neal: London Riots (Photographer’s blog: August 2011)

LA Weekly: David Strick, Celebrity Photographer, Suing L.A. Times For Publishing His Photos After he Left The Paper (LA Weekly: 2011)

The Jewish Chronicle: Ernst Haas: the Mad Men’s favourite photographer (Thejc.com: 2011)

Newsweek: Jerome Liebling: Chronicler of the Streets (Newsweek: August 2011)

Frenobee.com: Lenses shield 9/11 photogs as they capture history (Fresnobee.com: August 2011)

Thames&Hudson blog: Magnum Contact Sheets – Commissioning #2 (T&H blog: August 2011)

Poynter: AP, Google offer scholarships to digital journalism students

Seattle Times: White House Photo Of Dover Ceremony Sparks Controversy 

Guardian: Photographer Murray Ballard’s Best Shot (Guardian: August 2011)

Guardian: Photographer Adoplhus Opara’s Best Shot (Guardian: August 2011)

Amateur Photographer: Ian Berry at Berlin Wall (AP: August 2011)

Verve: Stuart Matthews (Verve: August 2011)

Verve: Eric Michael Johnson (Verve: August 2011)

The Best Street Photograph Ever  (sevensevennine.com: 2011)

photo: Kevin Carter

30 Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographs From The Last 30 Years (buzzfeed.com: 2011) via @yunghi

BJP: Bringing crowdfunding to book publishing

BJP: BBC caught in Twitter copyright row 

BJP: Apple’s MacBook Air v. iPad 2: which is better for professional photographers?

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Tamas Dezso

Winners of the 2011 Daylight/CDS Photo Awards

BJP International Photography Award 

People’s Choice : Summershow 2011

multiMediaHungry Eye Magazine

Talks - ”Aesthetics have no place in photographing famine” with David Campbell & Jon Levy August 18 on OPEN-i

Collectives – MJR : Weekly Collection 94

ServicesBob Books

Books

Questions Without Answers, a 368pp book featuring 20 yrs of world history by the VII photographers, will be published by Phaidon November 1.

Independent : Seba Kurtis: Drowned review

Photographers

Maureen Drennan

Mustafah Abdulaziz

James Mollison

Tessa Bunney

Lorenzo Meloni

Richard Sandler

Jobs

MediaStorm : Operations and Social Media Manager

Magnum Photos NY is hiring a Print Sales Manager

AP photo editor position open in Cairo

The New Yorker is seeking autumn multimedia intern : email kristina_budelis@newyorker.com  or DM @dbudelis

Fast Company is looking for an intern

Red Eye is looking for a part time Events Co-ordinator based in Manchester

To finish off…

Youarenotaphotographer

and…

Stasi fashion via msnbc photoblog

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Two nights of rioting in London's Tottenham neighborhood erupted following protests over the shooting death by police of a local man, Mark Duggan. Police were arresting him when the shooting occurred. Over 170 people were arrested over the two nights of rioting, and fires gutted several stores, buildings, and cars. The disorder spread to other neighborhoods as well, with shops being looted in the chaos. Collected here are images from the rioting and the aftermath. -- Lane Turner (26 photos total)
Fire fighters and riot police survey the area as fire rages through a building in Tottenham, north London on Aug. 7, 2011. A demonstration against the death of a local man turned violent and cars and shops were set ablaze. (Lewis Whyld/PA/AP)

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Extreme weather events have always been with us, and always will be. One can't point to a single severe storm, or even an entire harsh winter, as evidence of climate change. But a trend of weather intensity, and oddity, grows. Droughts linger longer. Hurricanes hit harder. Snowstorms strike long after winter should have ended. World record hailstones fall. China endures a crippling drought, and then punishing floods. Millions are displaced in a flood of historic proportion in Pakistan. The U.S. sees the Mississippi River reach historic flood crests, and then sees the largest wildfire in Arizona history. None of these events on their own mean anything. Collectively, do they mean we're seeing the earth's climate change before our eyes? -- Lane Turner (47 photos total)
A huge swath of the United States is affected by a winter storm that brought layers of dangerous ice and blowing snow, closing roads and airports from Texas to Rhode Island in this February 1 satellite image. The storm's more than 2,000-mile reach threatened to leave about a third of the nation covered in harsh weather. Ice fell first and was expected to be followed by up to two feet of snow in some places. (NOAA/AP)

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