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Liz Hingley

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Bright red telephone boxes, afternoon tea, bobbies with batons. Today even the most naive tourist knows this Mary Poppins vision of Britain is about as true to life as Dick Van Dyke’s cockney accent. But what, then, does it mean to be British in 2012? That’s a question the London Festival of Photography has tried to answer with its headline show, “The Great British Public.” The exhibition brings together 13 photographers who have captured modern British life, from posh wingdings to a wind-lashed laundry day on Scotland’s Orkney Islands. “We wanted to celebrate Britain more than be depressed about it,” says curator Grace Pattison, noting her countrymen’s talent for grousing. “It’s about the quirkiness, irony, the humor of the British. It’s quite an uplifting show, really.”

Nothing jars more with the British sensibility than the idea of forced positivity. Yet Pattison is savvy enough to have built a ‘warts-and-all’ show that winks at its subject while patting it on the back. Some of the photographers have taken on traditions that still thrive in parts of the country. Chris Steele-Perkins captures the lives of the increasing number of Brits who live to be 100 and receive a congratulatory birthday card from the Queen. Arnhel de Serra (the only non-Brit in the show) has captured the action at countryside agricultural shows, where elderly ladies in tweed vie for top prizes in jam-making and flower arranging. Giulietta Verdon-Roe presents a different glimpse into rural life with her elegiac images of the northernmost Orkney Island, population 51 (plus a few thousand seaweed-eating sheep and one very tall lighthouse).

Other photographers focus on the new traditions being created. Photographer Ewen Spencer followed the rise of the Grime music scene (epitomized by black artist Dizzee Rascal), and the young people who hope to rap their way out of London’s poorest neighborhoods.

And then, of course, there is Britain’s ethnic diversity, often packed into small areas like the borough of Hackney in London, documented by Zed Nelson, or a street in the northern city of Birmingham, photographed by Liz Hingley, which hosts over 30 different places of worship including a mosque and a Hindu temple.

It’s impossible to talk about British photography without mentioning Martin Parr, whose seminal The Last Resort: Photographs of New Brighton (1982-86) presented working class holiday-makers—they of the bulging, pink flesh and oily fish and chip wrappers—in all their vulgar glory. For the exhibition, Pattison preferred not to dwell on Parr’s 80s oeuvre (“It’s not the most exciting way to talk about Britain anymore.”). Rather, she chose an homage to Parr in the work of Peter Dench, who returned to the parts of New Brighton featured in The Last Resort and photographed them as they are today. Even now, the northern town near Liverpool provokes wry bemusement among the British: “It’s all quite gray and the scenery isn’t that exciting,” says Pattison. “It’s seaside life, but with a quite humorous look.”

One image of Parr’s does appear in the exhibition: a picture of an English bobby, standing in a red-brick town, hands on hips, while children hula hoop in the street. “At first glance, you think, ah, it’s a really traditional English scene,” says Pattison. “But it’s actually a historic museum in the Black Country [the industrial Midlands]. It’s actually just a mock street and he’s an actor dressed up as a policeman.”

Finally, the exhibition touches on the British at play, whether it be country and seaside escapes (Simon Roberts), a barbershop in London where locals hash out the day’s politics (Nick Cunard) or the beer-swilling excesses of English football fans (Homer Sykes).

Even with such a multifarious show, Pattison is worried the British public in question will find something to quibble about. “By calling it ‘The Great British Public’ we are potentially asking for criticism if people don’t feel like their view of Britain is in there,” she says. But in the year of the London Olympics and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations, Pattison is allowing herself to be Britishly optimistic. “Hopefully not too many people will say that,” she says with a laugh.

The London Festival of Photography’s exhibition The Great British Public will be on view from June 1 through June 24. More information is available here.

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Features and Essays 

Egypt, Cairo, Tahrir….

Moises Saman has been kicking ass with his Cairo work…NYT front page pics on several occasions during the last two weeks…This is the slideshow a lot of people were talking about over the weekend…

Moises Saman: Cairo Undone (NYT) Cairo Undone on Magnum site.

Saman hit the front page also today (November 29) with an image  (to-me maybe not so obvious choice) seen below, which can be found online in the NYT’s Egypt Turmoil slideshow…featuring work by various photographers.

photo: Moises Saman

Below image ran on the front page of the International Herald Tribune last week….You can see it in black and white in this Saman’s tweet…The colour version is up on Magnum Photos site…

Moises Saman: Unrest in Cairo: Egypt’s Revolution Continues (Magnum)

Miguel Angel Sanchez: Egyptians (NYT Lens) Angel Sanchez’s website

Davide Monteleone: Egypt Waiting (VII)

Espen Rasmussen: Beyond Tahrir Square (Panos)

Guy Martin: The Egyptian Revolution (Panos)

Trevor Snapp: Revolution Round Two? (Global Post) Full edit on photographer’s archive

NB. See later in this post regarding the latest TIME cover on Egypt that ran on all markets except the US. Filed under Articles.

Tim Hetherington’s last images on Magnum Photos…

Credit: Tim Hetherington. LIBYA. Misurata. April 20, 2011. Tim’s last photograph.

Tim Hetherington: The Libya Negs (Magnum)

Occupy Wall Street…

Christopher Anderson: OWS (New York Magazine)

Noticed that Ashley Gilbertson’s OWS series shot in October had sadly disappeared from VII site, but the reason turned out to be that New Yorker had put him on assignment (here’s a pic of him working)…I’m sure the series will reappear on VII in the future, but for now we can enjoy an edit on Photo Booth…good news: it includes new frames, such as the below one,  shot this month…

Ashley Gilbertson: Occupy Wall Street (Photo Booth)

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Related to OWS issues I would say… Great series on American poverty by Joakim Eskildsen…

Joakim Eskildsen: Photographs of American Poverty (Lightbox)

From the other side of the American political spectrum…

Jason Andrew: Tea Party: Under the banners of American Flags  (Reportage)

DRC and elections…

Finbarr O’Reilly: Deadly Election Violence in Congo (Reuters)

Jonathan Torgovnik: Rebuilding DRC (Reportage)

Pierre Gonnord: Relatos (Lightbox)

Liz Hingley: Under Gods (Lightbox)

Gillian Laub: Turkey Day (Lightbox)

Paul Fusco: DGI  29 (Magnum in Motion)

Alixandra Fazzina: The Flowers of Afghanistan: First Sea (Photographer’s archive)

Pep Bonet: Microcredit Peru (NOOR)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Caspian (Foto8)

Saw and edit of this feature run in Time mag couple of weeks ago..

Xavier Zimbardo: Reconstruction of the Bolshoi Theatre (Reportage) Behind the scenes video with Xavier Zimbardo in French

Best of the year….

photo: Goran Tomasevic

Reuters : Best Photos of the Year 2011

photo: Lynsey Addario

VII – Best of 2011: Highlights of a Year in News   : VII photographers present their best images, shot or released in 2011

AFP: 2011 Pictures of the Year

Fan of David Cameron or not,these Tom Stoddart photos in Reportage Tumblr are worth seeing.Cameron by Stoddart for Sunday Times Magazine….

Tom Stoddart: David Cameron (Reportage Tumblr)

Andrew McConnell’s Gaza surfing series on Newsweek…Bummed I still haven’t received the first issue of my annual subscription… Would have loved to have seen this in print…

Andrew McConnell: Surf’s Up in Gaza (Newsweek)

McConnell from Gaza also, but very different…NGO piece…

Andrew McConnell: Regenerating Gaza (Guardian)

Japan…

Giulio Di Sturco: Awash in Wrackage :  Japan (PDNPhotoaDay)

Kishin Shinoyama: After the Storm: Post-Tsunami Japan (Lightbox)

Donald Weber: Life After Zero Hour (VII) Japan

Davide Monteleone: Dusha: Russian Soul (VII)

Stefano di Luigi: Hidden China (VII)

Massimo Berruti: Lashkars in Pakistan (Lightbox) The series in Le Monde

Annie Leibovitz:  Pilgrimage (NYT)

Luceo Images: Few and Far Between (NYT Lens)

Joao Pina: Tracing the Shadows of Operation Condor (NYT Lens)

Andew Testa: Mind the Masterpiece (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter Photos from the Skies Above Poland (NYT Lens)

Jared Moossy: Mourning in Mogadishu (Foreign Policy)

Sebastian Liste: Urban Quilombo (Reportage)

Teun Voeten: Narco Estado (Magnum Emergency Fund)

Nick Cobbing: The Solid Sea (Photographer’s website)

Harvey Wang: A World of Change on the Lower East Side (NYT)

Robb Hill: Rural Home Town (NYT Lens)

Suzanne Opton: Soldier Down: Portraits (Lightbox)

Kirill Nikitenko: Russian Portraits of Defiance (Newsweek) Nikitenko’s website

Brian Van Der Brug: In Prison and Dying (LA Times Framework photo blog)

Lourdes Jeannette: Blood Ties (Lightbox)

Caged animals.

Asmita Parelkar: Not-So-Wild-Kingdom (NYT Lens)

Stuffed animals.

Klaus Pichler: Behind the Scenes Photos of Natural History (NYT Lens)

Guillaume Herbaut: The Zone (Project website) Now in English

Guillermo Arias: Tijuana River City (zReportage)

Kate Holt: The Real Cost of War (zReportage)

Natalie Naccache Mourad: Madaneh Marriages (photographer’s website)

Marc Lester: Living with Breast Cancer (Anchorage Daily News)

Oli Scarff: Winners at the Poultry Club’s 2011 national show (Guardian)

 Interviews and Talks


David Douglas Duncan (Lightbox)

Seamus Murphy (Verve Photo)

David Alan Harvey (Develop photo Vimeo)

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #6 (Phaidon)

Giles Duley : Becoming the Story (Economist)

Jason Larkin (Frontline club)

Alissa Everett : Giving up finance for photojournalism (CNN)

Sebastian Liste pt.1 / pt.2 (Daylight Magazine)

Marco Grob : How I Got That Shot: The 3-Minute Portrait (PDN)

Is this Annie Leibovitz and Fuji X100?

Annie Leibovitz (NPR)

Annie Leibovitz ♥’s Her iPhone Camera (PDN)

Jodi Bieber talks about the reaction to her World Press Photo winning photograph on The Strand (BBC)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (The Broad’s Sheet)

Useful advice by Rachel Palmer…

Rachel Palmer : How to get a photography commission for an NGO (photographer’s/photo editor’s website)

Kate Peters (IdeasTap)

Eric White (MSNBC photo blog)

Lisa Pritchard : Ask an Agent 5 (LPA blog)

Liz Hingley : Turning point (NYT Lens)

BagNewsSalon webinar, “The Visual Politics of Occupy Wall Street.” :  4 December

Videos

BBC: The ‘genius’ of Tim Hetherington killed in war

Articles 

Time magazine does it again….’dummying-up’ (I might have just made up that word) the US edition I mean… My mate Tim Fadek has the TIME cover this week with a terrific image from Cairo in all markets expect the US….

Peek inside…This is how Tim’s two other photos ran…

Comment…

Business Insider: These Time Magazine Covers Explain Why Americans Know Nothing About The World

PDN: Israel Apologizes to Lynsey Addario

Saw Lynsey Addario ( @lynseyaddario) tweet a link to this Marie Claire piece on female photojournalists…Featuring Addario herself, Agnes Dherbeys, Erin Trieb, Stephanie Sinclair, and Andrea Bruce

photo: Stephanie Sinclair

Marie Claire: Female Photojournalists | “Once thought of as too frail for the job, five award-winning women photojournalists share their most vivd memories from the field — and the images they will never forget.”

Related…

NYT: Arrests and Attacks on Women Covering Protests in Cairo 

NYT: Software to Rate How Dratically Photos Are Retouched

PDN: Inside the Bestseller List: Top Photo Books of 2011

NYT: Shooting for Global Change (NYT Lens)

I was in Istanbul over the weekend, but sadly had no time to check out any of these exhibitions…

photo: Bruno Barbey

NYT: A Whirling Document of Turkish Culture

PDN: Cartier-Bresson Photo Sets Record at Christie’s Auction in Paris

Yahoo: Camera lost at sea returned with the help of social networking

TimeOut: Photography galleries in London

Dvafoto: Find Copyright Violations of Your Pictures With src-img Bookmarklet

A Photo Editor: Real World Estimates – Flat Rate Magazine Contracts

BJP: Editorial photographers hit by latest Getty Images cuts

BJP: Photographer Jean-Christian Bourcart wins the 2011 Prix Nadar for his book Camden

BJP: Celebrated printer Gene Nocon dies

Joerg Colberg: What Photographs Can and Cannot Do (Conscientious)

Guardian: Jodi Bieber’s Best Shot

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Tim Wimborne

Photoshelter Guide: Selling Stock Photography

Foto8: Book review – Ben Lowy: Iraq Perspectives

Related..

A Photo Editor: This Week In Photography Books

Looking into some  heavy duty camera ‘bags’… Saw Greg Funnell tweet this review he had done in 2008…

Greg Funnell: Gear Review : Think Tank Airport Security Vs Pelican Case 1510 (Photographer’s blog)

Verve Photo: Jake Price

Awards, Grants, and Competitions 

photo: Jan Grarup

Leica Oskar Barnack Award will be accepting entries from 16 January 

College Photographer of the Year : International picture story winning images & judges screencast are online

Rory Peck Awards Winners

FotoEvidence Book Award open for submissions

Photo Lucida Critical Mass 2011 Winners

FotoVisura Grant

LPA Student Challenges 

Crowd Funding

Emphas.is Crowdfunding photojournalism survey

Behind the smokescreen by Rocco Rorandelli (Emphas.is) featured on BJP

Grozny – Nine Cities by Kravets, Morina, Yushko (Emphas.is) project featured on NYT Lens in 2010

Agencies and Collectives

VII Newsletter

Panos Pictures newsletter

Statement Images submissions deadline extended

Jobs

Look3 : Exhibits Coordinator

Saw these on Twitter…

New Yorker : spring multimedia intern (students only) : Contact kristina_budelis[at]newyorker.com

Redux is in need of an intern in NYC office : Adobe Creative Suite skills is necessary:  send an email to submissions[at]reduxpictures.com with Internship in the subject line

Intern for Phaidon.com . Email features@phaidon.com with your CV

Desk Space

Roof Unit : London

Photographers 

Website relaunch…

Marcus Bleasdale

Benjamin Lowy : December 2011 Promo

Asmita Parelkar

Louis Quail

Caleb Ferguson

Marc Lester

Bruno Mancinelle

To finish off…

Very, very good Erroll Morris short… The Umbrella Man from NYT

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In the early 20th century, around the time cars filled our streets, planes found their way into our skies and cameras began to capture our daily life, we started to see space being cut up and transformed in art works. Inextricably linked to this rise of modern technology, collage art took on a new role. While once strictly fantastical, now collage could be utilized to visually pull together reality-based images of day-to-day life. In keeping with the fast pace of 20th-century life, multiple ideas could now exist within one frame.

This new way of creating photo collages took many forms in the past hundred years—seen most distinctly in the works of the Surrealists in the 1920s and the pop artists in the 1960s. Today’s generation of photo collage artists use everything from found images on the Internet and historical reportage to references appropriated from mass global media. Dutch artist Ruth van Beek’s newest book and installment of photo collages, Hibernators, represents this new direction of collage art.

Van Beek uses found photographs, amateur family photographs, newspaper clippings and magazine tears in her work, in which she tries to create something that never existed before. “I try to make the animals come to life again by cutting and folding the paper,” she says. “I restrain them in a new shape. This way I turn them into creatures that are silent like stones, but are also showing a tension.”

Van Beek’s work represents a more controlled, more intimate breed of collage work. Hibernators cuts and folds common domestic pets and animals into creatures that exist somewhere between photography and collage. Through van Beek’s handy work, the facial features of the animals are often removed—further abstracting them from a sense of space. With the loss of distinguishing features, the altered animals begin to take on new identities.

The Hibernators was published this month by RVB books.

Ruth van Beek graduated from the renowned Gerrit Rietveld Academie in 2002. She has shown her collage work both in her native Netherlands, as well as throughout Europe and North America.

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For photographer Liz Hingley, one of the most familiar locales was also one of the most uncharted. The images in her series “Under Gods” capture cultures from all parts of the globe, many in various states of religious practice. In one, a Jainist woman prays while wearing a mask over her mouth, preventing her from inadvertently breathing any microbes or insects in, which would go against her religion’s non-violent beliefs. Another photograph shows three Catholic children, Polish immigrants, rehearsing carols. In another, a Hare Krishna trudges uphill, through the snow, to distribute books. Each photograph seemingly shows a different world, yet all of the images were shot along a single stretch of road in Birmingham, U.K.

Crammed along a two-mile stretch on Soho Road are more than 30 religious buildings in a city that is home to more than 90 different nationalities. Hingley grew up in Birmingham so she had personal knowledge of the religious diversity that existed in her hometown, which she was often reminded of whenever she returned. “I was going back to Birmingham and seeing this celebration among all this diversity and I thought that this was something that I wanted to look at,” Hingley, the daughter of two Anglican priests, told TIME.  And look she did, spending nearly two years capturing the practices and interactions of this multi-faith community. The result is the Under Gods: Stories From Soho Road series, which has been shown around the world and made into a book.

Though she was familiar with the area, having lived in Birmingham until she was 18, Hingley said she was caught off guard by the religious mélange the community held. “I had no idea that there were so many different religions and practices going on in just one street,” she said.

It was a lot to document. A day of shooting could start as early as 5 a.m. meeting Hare Krishnas who gathered to chant, before she’d attend a lunch at the Vietnamese Buddhist temple and then move on to the park with members of the Jesus Army, an evangelical Christian movement. “It was a very difficult project to finish [each evening] because you’re tired at the end of the day and you think, oh, I’ll just see what that building is,” said Hingley, who describes herself as “nosy.”

That nosiness clearly paid off, however, as she captured some wonderfully intimate moments. Several photographs show the ways in which the different cultures overlap in the small community, as their paths frequently intersected. One photograph shows a young Muslim girl, cloaked in Islamic dress, speaking over the fence in her backyard to her Jehovah witness neighbors. Another shows a Jain schoolgirl, sitting on the floor reading in front of an Indian sitar while beside her poses another girl, her neighbor, in white ruffled Holy Communion dress.

For all of the stark contrasts that appear in the work, there’s also a sense of ease to the images. Soho Road — which enfolds people of the Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist and Jain, Christian and Sikh faiths — appears as a cultural mosaic, with each set of traditions represented as a distinct part of the community’s whole. Hingley said that the work has inspired her to continue the series in Paris, where she’s just completed a show with Next Level projects, adding that she’s interested in the experiences of religion in the secular state. She’s also quick to point out that her series isn’t about dogmatic beliefs, but rather how beliefs pervade people’s lives. She claims that Stories From Soho Road was personal for her—a look at her own journey living in Birmingham.

“I don’t feel that it’s documenting religion or just that. I feel it’s about many things. Religion is definitely a part of your daily life. It’s everything,” she said. “I wanted to show what it gives people and the beauty it can bring to people’s lives.”

Liz Hingley is a photographer currently based in Paris. See more of her work here.

Megan Gibson is a Writer-Reporter at the London bureau of TIME. Find her on Twitter at @MeganJGibson

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Features and Essays 

Anastasia Taylor-Lind’s latest work done originally for this year’s Joop Swart Masterclass now on her agency VII’s website… Great series…See later in this post for a link to a related interview…

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: The National Womb (VII) Nagorno-Karabakh

There’s 7 billion of us in this planet now…To note the mark, Newsweek published Martin Roemers’ World Press Photo winning series Metropolis …

Martin Roemers: Metropolis (Newsweek)

Lynsey Addario: From One Maternity Ward, a Growing World (NYT Lens)

Ty Cacek: The Ku Klux Klan Revisited (Time Lightbox)

Rodrigo Abd: Guatemala (NYT Lens)

Gareth Phillips: Cross Channel Swimmers (MJR)

Benjamin Lowy: iAfghanistan (Reportage)

Liz Hingley: Jones’ (Firecracker)

Inge Morath: Dancing Queens: Lost Images from a Grand Ball (TIME Lightbox)

photo: Pep Bonet

NOOR: Urban Survivors (NOOR) Group project by the agency’s photographers

Jan Grarup: Hunger in the Horn of Africa (NOOR)

Elaine Stocki: Beyond Yale: Another View of New Haven (Time Lightbox)

photo: Alex Majoli

Magnum Photographers (Moises Saman and Alex Majoli): Libya Aftermath (Magnum)

Joao Silva: Twenty-Six Miles Along Recovery’s Road (NYT Lens)

Kike Arnal: Choco : Looking for Gold in a Distant Jungle (NYT Lens)

John Conn: When the City Was a House of Horrors (NYT Lens)

Lise Sarfati: Portraits (Photo Booth)

Pete Muller: Sudan (NYT Lens)

Veejay Villafranca: Manny Pacquiao (Newsweek)

James Hill: The Bolshoi Theater Reopens (NYT)

Corinne May Botz: Haunted Houses (Time Lightbox)

Yuri Kozyrev: Occupy Sana’a (Time Lightbox)

Erika Larsen: Sami Reindeer Herders (video) (NGM)

Liam Maloney: Grey Zone : Toronto’s injection drug harm reduction program (cbc.ca) Maloney’s website

Tomas Munita: In Egypt, Tourism Remains in Tailspin (NYT)

Benjamin Rusnak: Lost Harvest (zReportage)

Emilio Morenatti: Captured Collection (Denver Post Photo Blog)

Carlos Barria: Jugderdem’s backyard (Reuters’s photo blog)

Ed Thompson: Occupy London (Telegraph) Thompson’s website

Ed Thompson: Rescued Hens (Featureshoot)

Ben Roberts: Occupied Spaces (photographer’s website) Occupy London | Also on BBC

Alban Kakylya: Climate Tourism in Greenland (Smithsonian) Kakulya’s website

Fred Herzog: Vancouver (TIME Lightbox)

Danilo Balducci: Domik Town (zReportage)

Chris Floyd: 140 Characters (BBC) same in Guardian

I remember reading about the below project from 2007, a year or probably more ago, and when Duckrabbit recommended it last week I thought I’d share it here…Some Twitter comments for the website since last night’s initial posting… One photographer mentioned “Exactly how a website should not ever look like.” and another “It feels like a bad acid trip.”….so do have a look…. It really is quite an “experimental interface for storytelling” as mentioned on the project’s website, and in my opinion you don’t necessarily even want to ‘Begin the Whale Hunt‘ (unless of course you want the acid trip!)  instead of just look at some of the stills on the ‘Highlights‘ page…although the number could be edited well down…

Jonathan Harris: The Whale Hunt (Project website 2007)

Interviews

World Press Photo Contest opens for entries in December…Video interviews with recent top prize winners on the WPP site…

Spotlight on the World Press Photo of the Year Winners : Bieber, Masturzo, Suau, Hetherington (World Press Photo)

Giles Duley (Guardian)

“Champagne lifestyle on a beer salary” – Marcus Bleasdale defines photojournalists’ lifestyle by quoting Tom Stoddart

Marcus Bleasdale : (BBC World Service) Starts at  18:45.

David Guttenfelder (MSNBC Photo blog) Photographing in North Korea

Ghaith Abdul-Ahad (Guardian)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (CPN)

Monica Allende (e-photoreview)

Danfung Dennis (BJP)

Marco Di Lauro (e-photoreview)

Karim Ben Khelifa (PDN) Banned for 20 Years, Photographer Returns to Tunisia

Emily Graham and Anna Stevens :  Contact Editions  (The Sip)

Ralph Morse : A Life Photographer’s Best Photos (life.com)

Elinor Carucci (La Lettre)

Lewis Whyld (BBC) England riots: One photographer’s baptism of fire

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #4 (Phaidon blog)

Sophie Gerrard (London Festival Fringe)

Articles

BJP: Photographer Stephen Ferry wins first Tim Hetherington Grant

PDN: The first Tim Hetherington Grant of $27.5K was awarded to Stephen Ferry for his work on the Colombian guerrilla war

photo: Michael Kamber

PDN: Compact Cameras, Keep it Discreet 

Guardian: Photographer Mitch Epstein’s Best Shot

Guardian: Mitch Epstein: American Power; Chris Steele-Perkins: The Pleasure Principle – review

Guardian: Britain’s photographic revolution

Guardian: Squeezing the vision of London’s proposed photographic spaces

BBC: Picture Power: Portraits of Five Leading Press Photographers

BBC: Sebastiao Salgado’s Genesis project

TIME Lightbox: Rawiya: Photography Collective Finds Strength in Numbers

NYT: Propaganda in a Time of War

NYT: Years Later, Lawsuit Seeks to Recreate a Wedding

New Yorker Photo Booth: Great Mistakes: Richard Mosse (Photo Booth)

PDN: Pictures of Photog’s Arrest Force Police Accountability

Lightbox: Collect.give : Photography Meets Philanthrophy

Telegraph: Warhol at the Glass House: the story behind the photograph
NYT: Vogue's Fashion Photos Spark Debate in India

NYT Lens: 15 Years That Changed Photography 

BJP: “Security guards have no right to prevent street photography,” says Home Office

Verve: Adriana Zehbrauskas

Verve: Bryan Derballa

Verve: Araminta de Clermont

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Navesh Chitrakar

Guardian: Overzealous cleaner ruins £690,000 artwork that she thought was dirty

BBC: Two photographers seeking an MA

Lightstalking: Keywording Tips and Strategies for Photographers

Trey Ratcliff :  Public Why I Don't Use Watermarks (Google+) 
Andrew Burton: What is Photojournalism? (photographer's blog)

Events and Exhibitions

World Press Photo 2011 exhibition ad seen in this week’s Time magazine….

World Press Photo 2011 opens at Southbank Centre London Friday 11 November

Emerging photographers to talk at BJP’s Vision (BJP)

Apple plans week of photography events (BJP)

Books and e-publications

This should be good… World Press Photo book of this year’s Joop Swart Masterclass participants’ work…

Next 01 : Joop Swart Masterclass 2011 

Danish Photojournalism by The Danish School of Media and Journalism

Vincent Laforet: Visual Stories

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Eros Hoagland Wins Aftermath Project Grant

World Press Photo opens for entries in December (BJP)

Lucas Dolega Award

Agencies and Collectives

I really like how Redux Pictures often tweet their photographers’ tear sheets….Ended up spending quite a bit of time on their website as a result the other day….Great line-up of photographers and contributors…Check ‘em out, if you are not familiar…

Redux Pictures : Photographers : Contributors

VII November 2011 newsletter

Getty Images Global Assignment November 2011 newsletter

Magnum Photos November newsletter

Cartel Photos

Crowdfunding and Initiatives

My friend Peter DiCampo has started a campaign to raise funds to help him continue his long term Life Without Lights project…. Peter has quite a track record with the project already, with awards such as British Journal of Photography’s International Photography award 2010, showcases and publications in Lens blog and others places, so do go and have a look….

Life Without Lights by Peter DiCampo (Kickstarter)

New York Times: Picturing 7 Billion : A Visual Time Capsule

The Karen of Mayo by Phil Behan (fundit.ie)

‘Everybody Street’ by Cheryl Dunn (Kickstarter)

Behind the smokescreen by Rocco Rorandelli (Emphas.is)

Spotlight on crowdfunding: Robin Hammond’s Condemned (BJP)

In the Shadow of the Pyramids by Laura El-Tantawy (Telegraph)

Services

Custom Brackets

White room Studios : photo studio hire London

Jobs

Director Brighton Photo Fringe

Blogs

CNN Photos blog

Reportage by Getty Images Tumblr

Photographers

Saw several nice portraits by Linda Brownlee of young British actors in the Independent on Sunday’s The New Review..Her website…

Linda Brownlee

Diana Markosian

Ayman Oghanna

To finish off… check out this pretty incredible video of starling murmuration

and Joe McNally’s Feelings on the Digital Workflow

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Brilliant street photography in NYT Lens by Matt Stuart yesterday…

Features and Essays - Matt Stuart: London, Very Dry, With a Twist (NYT Lens: November 2010)

Stuart’s website

Just in….

NEWS – World Press Photo 2011 Jury : “Nineteen recognized professionals in the field of press photography worldwide will judge the entries at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam from 29 January until 10 February 2011.”

Some ‘polaroid’ work on the Reuters Full Focus blog…. Jim Young hasn’t gone the iPhone route as a lot of photographers lately, but chose the Fuji Instax as his tool…

Features and Essays - Jim Young: Presidential Polaroids (Reuters Full Focus blog: November 2010)

US mid-term elections coming up…Suau and Miller on TIME

Features and Essays - Anthony Suau: Scenes from the Stewart Colbert Rally (TIME: November 2010)

Features and Essays - Greg Miller: The Poll Workers (TIME: October 2010) The men and women charged with ensuring the integrity of the voting process

Features and Essays - Sven Torfinn: Proposed Road in Serengeti National Park (NYT: October 2010) Tanzania

Magnum Photos is now selling photos from Paolo Pellegrin’s first NatGeo assignment, Waters Wars,  published in National Geographic  Magazine in April this year…and which was also shown on NYT Lens and NPR Pictureshow… still worth checking this one out, as there are images which weren’t included on the three previous platforms…

Features and Essays – Paolo Pellegrin: Waters Wars (Magnum: 2010)

Features and Essays – Hossein Fatemi: The Surge (Panos: October 2010) Afghanistan

Features and Essays – Steve Pyke: Philosophers | article (NYT: October 2010)

InterviewsJR : Ted Prize (Ted: 2010)

Interviews - Christopher Morris : Mr President (VII Magazine: October 2010)

InterviewsAnastasia Taylor-Lind (Digital Photo Pro: 2010)

InterviewsLiz Hingley : A journey through Soho Road (Telegraph: October 2010)

I only recently discovered  - after having worked for the FT myself –  that the paper has a really good Life and Arts section on Saturday’s… The FT Magazine is great too…

Articles – Financial Times: Photographer Larry Clark’s muses (FT: October 2010)

TwitterGideon Mendel

Check this out!

EquipmentBlast Boxers

As a final note… 30,524 views in October… Thank you!

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Features and Essays - Yuri Kozyrev: Dzerzhinsk (NOOR: June 2010) The most poisonous town on earth

Features and Essays – Ron Haviv: Terrifying Normalcy (Starved for Attention: June 2010) Bangladesh

Features and Essays - Krisanne Johnson: Postcard from Johannesburg (New Yorker Photo Booth: June 2010)

Features and Essays – Edward Burtynsky: Manufactured Landscapes (New Yorker Photo Booth: June 2010)

Articles – Verve Photo: Milan Jaros (Verve: June 2010)

Articles – Verve Photo: Laure Geerts (Verve: June 2010)

Articles - Verve Photo: Andy Spyra (Verve: June 2010)

Articles - Verve Photo: Natan Dvir (Verve: June 2010)

Articles - Verve Photo: Liz Hingley (Verve: June 2010)

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