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Majid Saeedi

Ten years ago, the International Labor Organization (ILO) established June 12 as World Day Against Child Labor. The ILO, an agency of the United Nations, says on its website: "Hundreds of millions of girls and boys throughout the world are engaged in work that deprives them of adequate education, health, leisure and basic freedoms, violating their rights." The World Day Against Child Labor was launched as a way to highlight the plight of these children and support governments and social organizations in their campaigns against child labor. [37 photos]

The rough hands of an Afghan child, at the Sadat Ltd. Brick factory, where some children work from 8am to 5 pm daily, seen on May 14, 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. (Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)

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The best photos of 2011 from around the globe. Warning: All images in this entry are shown in full, not screened out for graphic content. Some images contain dead bodies, graphic content and tragic events. We consider these images an important part of human history.

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The best photos of 2011 from around the globe. Warning: All images in this entry are shown in full, not screened out for graphic content. Some images contain dead bodies, graphic content and tragic events. We consider these images an important part of human history.

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2011 was a year of global tumult, marked by widespread social and political uprisings, economic crises, and a great deal more. We saw the fall of multiple dictators, welcomed a new country (South Sudan), witnessed our planet's population grow to 7 billion, and watched in horror as Japan was struck by a devastating earthquake, a tsunami, and a nuclear disaster. From the Arab Spring to Los Indignados to Occupy Wall Street, citizens around the world took to the streets in massive numbers, protesting against governments and financial institutions, risking arrest, injury, and in some cases their lives. Collected here is Part 3 of a three-part photo summary of the last year, covering 2011's last months. Be sure to also see Part 1, and Part 2, totaling 120 images in all. [40 photos]

Occupy Wall Street protesters march and hold signs in New York City on September 17, 2011. Frustrated protesters had been speaking out against corporate greed and social inequality on and near Wall Street for the previous two weeks, further sparking a protest movement that spread across the world. Original here. (CC BY SA Carwil Bjork-James)

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SIRTE, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi, Libya’s dictator for 42 years until he was ousted in an uprising-turned-civil war, was killed Thursday as revolutionary fighters overwhelmed his hometown of Sirte and captured the last major bastion of resistance two months after his regime fell. Interim government officials said one of Gadhafi’s sons, his former national [...]

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The month of May in Afghanistan opened with news of US Navy SEALs killing Osama bin Laden. Suicide bombings claimed lives throughout the country, one injuring the top German commander. Another outside the Italian military base in Herat west of Kabul killed at least five. As the month closed, President Hamid Karzai issued vague warnings against Western airstrikes that cause civilian casualties. Gathered here in our monthly collection from Afghanistan are images of the US military mission and daily life in the country of just under 30 million people. -- Lloyd Young (45 photos total)
n Afghan youth looks on as a US Marine from 3rd Battalion 9th Marines Kodiak Company stands guard during a patrol in Kote Tazagul area in Marjah district in Helmand Province on May 24, 2011. US lawmakers saw momentum for political reconciliation in Afghanistan in the wake of Osama bin Laden's death, but voiced fear that the fight against extremism was floundering in Pakistan. (Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images)

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Every year, Hindus greet the turn of winter into spring with a splash of color -- in some areas, a geyser of color. They call their celebration the festival of Holi, and Hindus across India and throughout the world share prayer, camaraderie, special food, and a general sense of mischief as they douse each other in dyes and colored water. The large festival has roots to many Hindu legends associated with the triumph of good over evil. One of the best-known stories tells the tale of the demoness Holika, who tried to kill Prahlad, the son of the demon king Hiranyakashyap, for refusing to worship his father. Instead, Holika is consumed in flames, which is replayed each year with bonfires and effigies, before the celebrants break out the hues and cries of the festival. - Lloyd Young (43 photos total)
Indians call it "playing colors" a jubilant scrum of horseplay and body painting. In Mumbai, colored powder is the weapon of choice for a pair of girls March 20. (Rafiq Maqbool/Associated Press)

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Paolo Pellegrin in Libya for the New York Times Magazine…

Features and Essays - Paolo Pellegrin: Scenes from the Libyan Exodus (NYT Magazine: March 2011)

Sunday Herald (Scotland) picture editor Ross Gilmore kindly sent a link to a Libya slideshow he had put on the newspaper’s website… Several brilliant photos by John Moore (see below), Marco Longari, et al….

Features and Essays - Sunday Herald: Libya (various photographer: Libya (Sunday Herald: March 2011)

Articles - Guardian Eyewitness: Emilio Morenatti: Migrant workers on the Tunisia-Libya border (Guardian: March 2011)

Guardian: Protests in Benghazi, eastern Libya (Guardian: March 2011) Protesters mass together under the pre-Gaddafi Libyan flag in the court square after Friday prayers in Benghazi, which has become the capital of the rebel movement

Dictator chic… Vanity Fair: Colonel Qaddafi—A Life in Fashion (VF: 2009)

Michael Christopher Brown doing Hipstas in Libya…

Features and Essays – Michael Christopher Brown: Libya (Photographer’s website: March 2011)

Don’t remember having seen Kosuke Okahara’s work in colour before…

Features and Essays - Kosuke Okahara:  Refugees at Libya’s borders with Tunisia (Russian Reporter: March 2011)

Kozyrev….

Updated TIME gallery with Yuri Kozyrev’s Libya work

NYT have continued to update their’s also… The below Lynsey Addario photo from 8 March really stuck in my mind…

Updated New York Times Libya gallery, up to 248 photos when I’m writing this

Nicole Tung in Libya, covering her first war, on BagNewsNotes…

Features and Essays – Nicole Tung: Eastern Libya (BNN: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Gabriele Stabile, Andy Rocchelli: Tunisian-Libyan Border (Cesuralab: March 2011)

InterviewsTyler Hicks In the Thick of Libya’s Brutal Fighting (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Zed Nelson had the Guardian Weekend cover today with 24 photos over 10 pages inside….

Features and Essays - Zed Nelson: Disappearing Tribes (Guardian: March 2011) Zed Nelson’s photographs capture the human face behind disappearing Britain – the war veterans, the miners, the boxers and the fishermen. Blake Morrison reflects on the price of progress

Features and Essays - Patrick Zachmann: Chinese Journal (Magnum: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Anastasia Taylor-Lind: The Return of the Female Cossacks (Marie Claire: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Sean Smith: Gang violence in Caracas (Guardian: March 2011) Gang warfare killed 14,000 people last year alone in Caracas. Sean Smith documents the violence that plagues the slums of Venezuela’s capital. Warning: Contains distressing images

Features and Essays - Ivan Kashinsky and Karla Gachet: Tunupa’s Tears (Panos: March 2011) Bolivia

Features and Essays - Michael Webster: Brooklyn Carnival (Burn: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Finbarr O’Reilly: Looking Through Afghanistan’s Closed Doors (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Chris Gregory: The Well: Covering Capitol Hill (Chris Gregory Vimeo: March 2011) Gregory’s website

Features and Essays -  Majid Saeedi: Deadly legacy: Afghan landmine victims in portraits (TIME: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Emily Bunt: Beloved (Foto8: March 2011) Bunt’s website

Features and Essays - Alex Masi: Buddhas of Bamiyan (BBC: March 2011)

InterviewsElizabeth Biondi (lalettredelaphotographie.com: March 2011)

Interviews - Alec Soth (Photocrew.com: March 2011)

InterviewsAlex Prager in conversation with Yancey Richardson (Aperture Foundation Vimeo: 2011)

Interviews and TalksJoel Meyerowitz (BJP: March 2011)

InterviewsMartin Brink (Ubranautica: 2011)

EventsChris Steele-Perkins Photovoice talk in London on Monday 14th March.

Grants MF Announces Funds for New Independent Documentary Photography Projects (Magnum Emergency Foundation Emergency Fund)

Articles – Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Andy Wong (Guardian: March 2011) Beijing-based Associated Press photographer Andy Wong captures daily life in the Chinese capital

Articles – Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Rodrigo Abd (Guardian: March 2011) The Guatemala-based, award-winning Associated Press photographer joins the world’s biggest party as Rio de Janeiro celebrates carnival

Articles – PDN: Tax Rule Changes and Tips That Will Save You Money on Your 2010 Returns (PDN: March 2011)

Videos - Pieter Hugo:  Spoek Mathambo music video (Dazed and Confused: March 2011)

Articles / Tutorials and Tips – Lightstalkers: Insurance for freelancers working in conflict zones (LS: 2011)

Photographers - Andrew Moore

Photographers - Tom Jamieson

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The buildup of forces in Afghanistan is complete, with the number of US troops there the highest yet. The surge is part of President Obama’s campaign to take the battle to the Taliban strongholds in the south and east, while accelerating training of Afghan security forces. In February, suicide attacks by militants increased, and villagers and Afghan officials accused NATO of killing a large number of civilians in airstrikes. The images in this month's post show Afghans and NATO-led soldiers working and living through moments of sheer terror and numbing poverty. Through the strife, we see glimpses of the enduring human spirit. --Leanne Burden Seidel (39 photos total)
An Afghan army recruit marches during a graduation parade after an oath ceremony at Ghazi military training center in Kabul Feb. 3. Strengthening the abilities of Afghan forces to secure their country has been a top goal of US policy. (Ahmad Masood/Reuters)

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