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Martin Scorsese

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This is a huge time for Mondo. The company kicked off SXSW last week with their massive Game of Thrones show. Later this week is the even bigger Stout/Taylor show. (Check back Friday for more on that.) And today they’ve revealed a truly historic entry into their archive.

Martin Ansin has done a poster for Martin Scorsese‘s Taxi Driver, tied to a screening at the Alamo Drafthouse in Austin, TX next week. Not only did Robert De Niro allow Mondo to use his likeness, Scorsese himself approved the poster. Check it out in full, below.

For more information on the screenings, visit this page. And here’s the Taxi Driver poster.

I can’t wait to see this one in person and look at all the detail. But I love how it evokes not only the dirty New York of the film, but the seventies style of the poster.

Odds are this will sell out at the screenings but, if there are leftovers, @MondoNews on Twitter would be the way to find out.

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Rich Hilleman, the chief creative director of Electronic Arts, has a big task: getting the company ready for the future. He has to navigate the waters of the social and mobile revolution while also keeping core gamers satisfied as the company's products shift to blockbusters-cum-online services. In this interview, Hilleman -- who has been at the company since the 1980s -- looks back as well as forward, reflecting on how the company's success on the ...

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Jimmy Kimmel has produced an epic 9-minute movie trailer parody featuring nearly every actor and actress in Hollywood. Movie: the Movie tackles every blockbuster and crowd pleaser movie and movie marketing cliches, and packs them all into one film trailer. Watch the trailer now embedded after the jump.

The trailer features appearances by Ryan Phillippe, Jessica Alba, Taylor Lautner, Antonio Banderas, Edward Norton , Josh Brolin, Colin Farrell, Charlize Theron, Tom Hanks, Bryan Cranston, Jeff Goldblum, Gary Oldman, Cameron Diaz, Samuel L. Jackson, Emily Blunt, John Krasinski, Jason Bateman, Kevin James, Daniel Day Lewis, John Goodman, Don Cheadle, Matt Damon, Kate Beckinsale, Chewbacca, Danny De Vito, Meryl Streep, Helen Mirren, Christoph Waltz, Matt Damon, George Clooney, Gabourey Sidibe, Steven Tyler and even directors J.J. Abrams and Martin Scorsese.

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Meryl Streep, 1990


Meryl Streep, 1984


Meryl Streep and Robert DeNiro, "Falling In Love", New York, NY, 1984


Meryl Streep and William Styron, "Sophies Choice", New York, NY, 1983


Meryl Streep, 1993


Kate Winslet, "Mildred Pierce", Brooklyn, NY, 2010


Martin Scorsese, "Hugo", London, England, 2010


Johnny Depp, Los Angeles, CA, 2009


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Sam Worthington on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Javier Bardem, Toronto, ON, 2007


Michael Fassbender, 2011


Kate Winslet and Ann Roth, "Mildred Pierce", Brooklyn, NY, 2010


Laura Linney, "The Big C", Stamford, CT, 2010


"Shutter Island", Boston, MA, 2008


"Nine", Cinecitta, Rome, Italy, 2009


Penelope Cruz and Daniel Day-Lewis, "Nine", Cinecitta, Rome, Italy, 2009


Tilda Swinton, New York, NY, 2009


Rachel Weisz, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Salma Hayek, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Woody Harrelson and Robin Wright, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Bennett Miller, Jonah Hill, Chris Pratt, & Brad Pitt, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Isabella Rossellini and Elettra Wiedemann, New York Magazine, August 22, 2011


Jude Law and Matt Damon


Paris


Jordan


Cuba


Senegal


Keira Knightley


Liev Schreiber, New York, NY, 2009


Sacha Baron Cohen and Martin Scorsese, "Hugo", London, England, 2010


Jude Law and Robert Downey Jr., "Sherlock Holmes", Brooklyn, NY, 2009


Audrey Tatou, "Coco Avant Chanel", Paris, France, 2008


Kara Walker, Brooklyn , NY, 2008


Bob Dylan


Nina Chanel Abney, New York, NY, 2009


Donna Karan, New York, NY, 2009


Maya Angelou, Winsten-Salem, NC, 2009


Twiggy and Kate Moss, London, UK, 1999

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Lovers of film are likely lovers of Takeshi Kitano. Sometimes billed as Beat Takeshi, he’s not only the evil star of Battle Royale, he’s the talented director of films like The Blind Swordsman: Zatoichi and Fireworks. In 2010, he directed and starred in Outrage, a twisting, turning crime drama in the vein of Martin Scorsese. It played several festivals, spawned a few trailers and was successful enough that a sequel, Outrage 2, is on the way. However, most fans haven’t had a chance to see the original because its U.S. release date was way off. Finally, Outrage is schedule to hit U.S. screens on December 2 and on-demand next week, October 28. There’s a brand new red band trailer for the film after the jump.

Thanks to Hulu for this trailer. (That means people outside the US probably can’t see this embed.)

Here’s the official plot description.

In a ruthless battle for power, several yakuza clans vie for the favor of their head family in the Japanese underworld. The rival bosses seek to rise through the ranks by scheming and making allegiances sworn over saké. Long-time yakuza Otomo has seen his kind go from elaborate body tattoos and severed fingertips to becoming important players on the stock market. Theirs is a never-ending struggle to end up on top, or at least survive, in a corrupt world where there are no heroes but constant betrayal and vengeance.

I saw Outrage at AFI Fest 2010 and enjoyed it immensely. It’s filled with the kind of kinetic energy that fuels the first 90 minutes of Casino or the last 30 minutes of Goodfellas with enough double crosses, great kills and evil characters to delight all lovers of crime and violence. Check it out when it’s available.

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To put the legacy of Stanley Kubrick into perspective, he made 13 movies in 46 years. In about the same amount of time, though not the same years, Alfred Hitchcock – also considered one of the masters – made over 50 films, equally about one per year. Martin Scorsese is approaching roughly the same number as Hitchcock and Steven Spielberg is on a similar pace. Even international legends like Francois Truffaut, Akira Kurosawa and Sergei Eisenstein, who all made films less frequently than those men, were much busier than Kubrick. Yet, with only 13 films in about five decades, Stanley Kubrick’s name will always be spoken alongside those as a first ballot film hall of famer. One of the best of the best.

In 1996, a documentary called Stanley Kubrick: The Invisible Man attempted to put this mysterious, reclusive, but brilliant film director into perspective and you can now watch the entire thing online.

Thanks to The Behind the Scenes Blog for the heads up. We’ve embedded part one and you can watch the additional five parts (making six total and running about an hour) at that link.

While it’s sad that Kubrick made so few films before his passing in 1999, the plus side is – because there are so few -  it’s easy to digest his entire body of work. At NYU I took a class on Kubrick and, in one semester, we watched 12 of his 13 films, missing only his first feature, the rare Fear and Desire.

Besides the obvious directorial shown in his editing, shooting and composition of shots, not to mention his ability to get incredible performances out of his actors and more, the one thing that always fascinated me about Kubrick was he never made the same film twice. It was almost as if he made a movie in one genre, mastered it, then moved along. He was like a video game player directing movies, always leveling up. “Oh, I defeated the World War II movie, let’s move onto the sword and sandal epic. Oh I beat that, let’s move on to the comedy, the sci-fi, the thriller, the horror” and so on.

Where you do rank Kubrick in your all time list?

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Currently playing at select cinemas across the country before Blu Ray rereleases,
Apocalypse Now and Taxi Driver deserve your attention not only as classics but as two films that changed the course of film history forever.

Produced during the seventies heyday of drugs and excess, they are pinnacles of their
respective celebrated director's careers - and considering that those directors are
Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese that's really saying something.

The making of Apocalypse Now in particular provides a fantastic insight into Hollywood
during a period that was beginning to revel in high budgets, high egos and studios
willing to take a risk, but also provided moments of intense, mad, cinematic genius for
audiences in the process.

With Taxi Driver, not only do you have the iconic "you talking to me?" scene with Robert
De Niro
, but also the film debut of Jodie Foster and a fantastic final score from
Hitchcock stalwart Bernard Herrmann.

So if you haven't seen these two yet, take a look at your local cinema listings or pay
some hard earned cash when they're released in beautiful high definition later in the
year.

Taxi Driver: 35th Anniversary Edition is released on the 6th June

Apocalypse Now: Full Disclosure Edition is released on the 13th June

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