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Maurice Sendak

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I Love Dust was approached earlier this year by the Cartoon Network to produce something memorable for their 20th anniversary. What followed is this 2 minute mind-melting bonanza featuring original music by Mad Decent and nearly every character who’s ever moved across the screen since Cartoon Network began airing content. It’s most definitely I Love Dust’s crowning animated achievement thus far.

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The throwback Hanna-Barbera thing happening in these PSAs for Mtv is fantastic. It’s the perfect marriage of style and content compliments of  Parasol Island for Grey. These are apparently 8 months old but this is the first I’ve seen of them.

Credits:
Client: MTV Switzerland
Agency: Grey
Chief Creative Officer: Andreas Henke, Sacha Reeb
Creative Director: Regner Lotz, Moritz Grub
Copywriter: Janus Hansen
Art Director: Alphons Conzen, Frederico Gasparian, Reto Oetterli
Producer: Dennis Eichner
Production: Parasol Island
Director: Charles Bals
Animation Director: Dino Figuera
Lead Animator: Hiroaki Ando
Background Artwork: Charles Bals, Oliver Navarro , Steve Scott
After Effects Animation: Christian Hoffmann, Heike Mauer
Producer: Sara Dadras, Meike Müller, Jack Gregory-Donald
Music: Jonathan Wulfes

 

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Here’s one documentary I look forward to seeing: Rick Cikowski and Brad Bernstein’s Far Out Isn’t Far Enough: The Tomi Ungerer Story. Illustrator Ungerer is the famed children’s book author/artist (The Three Robbers) and occasional pornographer, revered by Maurice Sendak, Jules Feiffer (both of whom appear in the doc) and Gene Deitch (who has adapted several of Ungerer’s books to animation). Filmmakers Cikowski and Bernstein funded the production last year through Kickstarter. It will premiere next month at the Toronto Inernational Film Festival. It looks good:

(Thanks, Martin Quaden)

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A long-lost version of The Hobbit by animation legend Gene Deitch has resurfaced online in the past few days. Why did Gene produce this 12-minute “animatic” version instead of the feature-length version he’d originally planned with Jiří Trnka? Why did he have just one month to produce it? Why has nobody ever seen it? The crazy circumstances that led to the production are revealed in this piece that Gene wrote on his website. In short, the film was a financial ploy by Deitch’s producer William L. Snyder to earn himself a nice chunk of change. Deitch writes:

The Tolkien estate had now been offered a fabulous sum for the rights, and [William] Snyder’s rights would expire in one month. They were already rubbing their hands together. But Snyder played his ace: to fulfill just the letter of the contract – to deliver a “full-color film” of THE HOBBIT by June 30th. All he had to do was to order me to destroy my own screenplay – all my previous year’s work, and hoke up a super-condensed scenario on the order of a movie preview, (but still tell the entire basic story from beginning to end), and all within 12 minutes running time – one 35mm reel of film. Cheap. I had to get the artwork done, record voice and music, shoot it, edit it, and get it to a New York projection room on or before June 30th, 1966! I should have told him to shove it, but I was basically his slave at the time. It suddenly became an insane challenge.

The rest of the story can be read on Gene’s website. And just for the record, the delightful illustrations in the film were created by Czech illustrator Adolf Born.

(Thanks, Stephen Persing, via Cartoon Brew’s Facebook page)

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