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Michael Itkoff

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A new book, Photographs Not Taken, conceived and edited by photographer Will Steacy compiles personal essays written by more than 60 photographers about a time when they didn’t or just couldn’t use their camera.

The book, released by Daylight, is a fascinating compilation by a wide cross-section of image makers from around the world and is often filled with thoughts of regret, restraint and poignant self-realizations.

On the eve of the one-year anniversary of Tim Hetherington’s tragic death in Misrata, Libya, we present one of the most eloquent chapters from the book, in which the photographer offers his thoughts on depicting the dead in photographs and the questioning moment he had after making a picture of a dead soldier in Afhganistan:

There are many reasons not to take a picture—especially if you find the
 act of making pictures difficult. I was not brought up with a camera, I
 had no early fascination for pictures, no romantic encounters with the 
darkroom—in fact I didn’t become a photographer until much later on 
in life when I came to realize that photography—especially documentary 
photography—had many possibilities. One thing for sure was that
 it would make me confront any inherent shyness that I might feel. It
 did, but I still find making pictures difficult, especially negotiating and 
confronting “the other,” the subject, and dealing with my own motivations
 and feelings about that process.

This personal debate about making pictures was particularly apparent 
during the years I lived and worked in West Africa. In 2003 I lived as one 
of the only outsiders with a rebel group that was attempting to overthrow 
then-President Charles Taylor. It was a surreal experience—cut off
 and living in the interior of the country, I accompanied a rag-tag army 
of heavily armed young men as they fought their way from the interior 
forest into the outskirts of the capital, Monrovia. Reaching the edges of
the city was an exhilarating experience after weeks of living in a derelict 
front-line town with little food. At one point, the rebels took over the
 beer factory and, after liberating its supplies, turned part of the facility 
into a field hospital where people with gunshot wounds were treated 
with paracetamol. Outside the factory compound lay about five bodies 
of people who, from the look of things, had been executed. A number 
had their hands tied behind their backs and most had been shot in the
 head and, despite the graphic nature, I had no qualms about making 
some photographs of these people.

Not long after, government forces counterattacked to push the rebels out 
of the city. Everyone was exhausted from the lack of sleep and constant 
fighting, and the retreat quickly turned into a disorganized scramble
 to get out of the city. Soldiers commandeered looted vehicles, and I 
even remember one dragging a speedboat behind it in the stampede 
to escape. To make matters worse, government soldiers were closing in
on the escape route and began firing from different directions on the 
convoy of vehicles. One rocket-propelled grenade took out a car behind
ours, and at one point we abandoned our vehicles and took shelter in a
nearby group of houses. I began seriously considering abandoning the rebels and heading out on my own toward the coastline on foot, but luckily thought better of it and got back inside the car with the group I was with.

The road slowly wound its way away from the low-slung shacks of
 the suburbs and back into the lush green forest. Our close-knit convoy 
started to thin a little as some cars sped out ahead while others, laden 
with people and booty, took their time. The landscape slid by as I tried
 to come down and calm my mind from the earlier events—I was in a
 heightened state of tension, tired, hungry, and aware that I was totally 
out of control of events. Just as I started to feel the euphoria of being
 alive, our car slowed in the commotion of a traffic jam. A soft-topped 
truck up ahead that was carrying about 30 civilians had skidded as it
 went around a corner and turned over on itself. A number of people 
had been killed and wounded—probably having the same thoughts of 
relief that I had before calamity struck. Now they were dead and their 
squashed bodies were being carried out from the wreckage. Someone 
asked me if I was going to photograph this—but I was too far gone to be
able to attempt any recording of the event. I couldn’t think straight, let 
alone muster the energy needed to make a picture. I just watched from 
a distance as people mourned and carried away the dead. My brain was
 like a plate of scrambled eggs.

There isn’t much more to add, but I always remember that day and the 
feeling of being so empty—physically, mentally, and spiritually—that it
 was impossible to make the photograph.

Years later, when I put together a book about those events in Liberia, I
 included a photograph of one of the people who had been killed outside 
of the beer factory. I thought it was an important picture but didn’t
 dwell on what it might mean for the mother of that boy to come across 
it printed in a book. My thoughts about this resurfaced recently as I put
 together a new book about a group of American soldiers I spent a lot of 
time with in Afghanistan. They reminded me a lot of the young Liberian 
rebel fighters, and yet, when I came to selecting a picture of one of their
 dead in the battlefield, I hesitated and wondered if printing a graphic 
image was appropriate. It was an image I had made of a young man 
shot in the head after the American lines had been overrun—not dissimilar
 from the one in Liberia. My hesitation troubled me. Was I sensitive
 this time because the soldier wasn’t a nameless African? Perhaps I had 
changed and realized that there should be limits on what is released 
into the public? I certainly wouldn’t have been in that questioning position 
if I’d never taken the photograph in the first place….but I did, and 
perhaps these things are worth thinking about and confronting after all.

—Tim Hetherington

Tim Hetherington (1970-2011) was a British-American photographer and 
filmmaker. His artwork ranged from digital projections and fly-poster exhibitions to handheld-device downloads. Hetherington published two monographs, Long Story Bit by Bit: Liberia Retold (Umbrage Editions, 2009), 
and Infidel (Chris Boot, 2010). His Oscar-nominated 
film Restrepo, about young men at war in Afghanistan, was also released in 2010.
 Tragically, Hetherington was killed while covering the 2011 Libyan civil war.

Photographs Not Taken also features work by Roger Ballen, Ed Kashi, Mary Ellen Mark, Alec Soth, Peter van Agtmael and many others. More information about the book and how to purchase it is available here

On April 22, 2012 from 2:00-4:00pm, MoMA PS1, located in Queens, NY, will host a a panel discussion with contributors Nina Berman, Gregory Halpern, Will Steacy, Amy Stein, moderated by Daylight founders Michael Itkoff and Taj Forer.

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Articles – Guardian: Joker in the pack: Bruce Davidson’s photographs of a Brooklyn gang (Guardian: June 2010) slideshow

Articles – Guardian: Photographer Sally Soames’s best shot (Guardian: June 2010)

I was looking through some of the National Geographic Magazine’s features from the previous year or so, and these couple caught my attention. I’ll probably post more in the coming days as I realised that I have neglected posting links to a lot of great NGM essays….

Features and Essays – John Stanmeyer: Sacred Waters (NGM: 2010) From the droplets in a baptismal font to the scattering of ashes on a holy river, water blesses our lives.

Features and Essays - John Stanmeyer: The End of Plenty (NGM: 2010) Special Report—The Global Food Crisis

I’ve posted this one before, but what the hell, it’s so good…

Features and Essays – Stephie Sinclair: The Polygamists (NGM: 2010) FLDS: An exclusive look inside the FLDS

This one’s such a fascinating story!

Features and Essays – Martin Schoeller: The Hadza (NGM: 2009) They grow no food, raise no livestock, and live without rules or calendars. They are living a hunter-gatherer existence that is little changed from 10,000 years ago. What do they know that we’ve forgotten?

Features and Essays - Rolling Stone: On The Ground With Runaway General Stanley McChrystal (Rolling Stone: June 2010)

multiMedia – Reportage : submissions : “Reportage is published by the Australian Centre for Independent Journalism which is part of the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). Reportage will accept articles and photojournalism from journalists who do not have a connection with UTS, providing the work is of a professional standard and produced according to the International Federation of Journalists or Australian Journalists’ Association Code of Ethics. Reportage will accept stories on a wide range of topics. We aim to fill gaps in news agendas. We have both an Australian and an international focus and will accept short or long stories. We publish news, as well as features. All work will carry a date of publication and be archived. We will link to or publish whole websites, indeed we are interested in experimenting with new ways of telling stories on the web. Because UTS staff and students have an interest in social research and theory, we have a place for research, analysis and opinion.”

Tutorials - 10 Tips for Photo Workshop Students (Foundry Photojournalism Workshop blog: June 2010)

InterviewsBruno Stevens (Leica blog: June 2010)

Interviews - Freya Najade (ePhotoreview Vimeo: June 2010)

InterviewsMikko Takkunen (GuatePhoto: June 2010)

Interviews - Michael Itkoff (GuatePhoto: June 2010)

InterviewsBrent Lewin (GuatePhoto: June 2010)

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Features and Essays – Marc Garanger: Unwilling Subjects in the Algerian War (NYT Lens: May 2010)

Articles – BJP: French photographer honoured at last night’s New York Photo Awards, despite severe technical problems (BJP: May 2010) Nominees on the final round were (NYPH)

Articles - BJP: NYPH 2010: Marc Garanger’s Femmes Algériennes (BJP 1854 blog: May 2010)

Articles - BJP: Young photographers reflect on the high price of some contests and competitions. Are they worth the money? (BJP 1854 blog: May 2010)

Features and Essays - Richard Mosse: The Tent Cities of Haiti (TIME: May 2010)

Features and Essays – Zackary Canepari: California Is A Place (Project website: 2010)

Photographers - Peter Pereira : website

Photographers – Michael Itkoff : website

Awards / Agencies – Reportage by Getty Images: Reza awarded ICP Infinity Award for Photojournalism (Reportage by Getty Images: May 2010)

Collectives - Statement Images

Tutorials - Brent Lewin’s 3D Imagery (Applied Arts Wire: 2010)

Twitter - CPJ

TwitterKosuke Okahara

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