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Nancy Borowick

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Features and Essays

Occupy Wall Street… Terrific photos by Ashley Gilbertson…

Ashley Gilbertson: #Occupy Wall Street (VII) Gilbertson’s earlier Wall Street series: Down on Wall Street and After the Fall

Spencer Heyfron: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Newsweek) Heyfron’s website

Nina Berman: Beyond the Fringe of Protest (NYT Lens)

From Chicago…

Jon Lowenstein: Occupy Chicago (NOOR)

Guillermo Cervera: Trading War for Waves (NYT Lens) Cervera’s archive

Brent Stirton: Virus Hunter (TIME Lightbox)

Libya…

Jehad Nga: Return to Libya (TIME Lightbox)

Michael Christopher Brown: Libya After Gaddafi (Newsweek)

Bryan Denton: Pictures from a Rebellion (Corbis blog) Libya

Afghanistan..

Ben Lowy: Life During Wartime (NYT Mag) | 6th Floor blog: Hipstamatic in Kabul

Larry Towell: Afghanistan 2011. Part II (Magnum)

Last Friday, President Barack Obama announced complete withdrawal of US forces from Iraq by the end of 2011…

In August, the New York Times took a look back at the war in Iraq on the frontlines and at home in the US…I don’t think I ever shared the slideshow…Various photographers’ work included…Below frame from Todd Heisler’s iconic Final Salute…(Remember seeing it first time as it was exhibited in Berlin as part of the touring World Press Photo 2006 exhibition, and being really amazed by it. Actually another Iraq series from the same exhibition, by Peter van Agtmael,  is etched in my memory as well. I saw the WPP 2006 show literally two weeks before I began studying photojournalism, so it had special impact.)

photo: Todd Heisler

New York Times (various photographers): Iraq: Drawing Down and Moving Ahead (NYT)

Mauricio Lima: The Circus Comes to Baghdad (NYT)

Ayman Oghanna: Iraqis (Photo Booth)

Last week I posted a link to Stephanie Sinclair’s Hillary’s Angels on VII…This week we have Diana Walker’s photos of Hillary herself on Lightbox. The series is also TIME cover story on all markets…Lightbox slideshow opens with a frame that is printed double spread in the magazine…

Diana Walker: Hillary Clinton (LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Road Trip (VII)

Lynsey Addario: Somali-Kenyan Famine (VII)

Moises Saman: Awaiting Tunisia’s Vote (NYT)

Tomas van Houtryve: Open Secret (VII Magazine)

Nancy Borowick: Mother’s Cancer (TIME Lightbox)

Alberto Maserin: Portraits of Priests (TIME Lightbox)

Timothy Fadek: Chongqing, China (Polka) “The biggest city you’ve never heard of.”

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The BRIT School (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter (Panos)

Jack Delano: Puerto Rico (NYT Lens)

Larry Fink: Vanity Fair’s Oscar parties (Photo Booth)

Lara Platman: Harris Tweed (BBC)

Toby Smith: Energy in China (NYT Lens)

Edward Burtynsky: View From Above  (Lightbox)

David Degner: Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution (FT Magazine)

Mustafah Abdulaziz & Justin Maxon: Providence (Vimeo)

Mikolaj Nowacki: Parting (VII Mentor)

Will Hartley: In Between Dreams (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks


Martine Franck (WSJ)

Check out DevelopPhoto’s Vimeo…

Develop Photo Vimeo Channel for Photography related videos  (DevelopPhoto Vimeo) Includes recent videos of photographers such as Ed Kashi, Donald Weber, and Peter van Agtmael speaking about the future of photography. Those originally from PhotoQ’s series Facing the Future here.

Dominic Nahr (The Fader)

Lars Tunbjork (New Yorker Photo Booth)

Ron Haviv (Takepart.com)

Juergen Teller (BJP) Teller on  his controversial shoot with Kristen McMenamy for 032c magazine.

Ziyah Gafic (PDN)

Matt Eich (Conscientious Extended)

Rankin (IdeasTap)

Shannon Jensen (10Answers) Jensen is one of the recent additions to Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent. Her portfolio here.

Articles

photo: Nicole Tung

Mike Kamber: On Young Photographers and Conflict’ in Libya (NYT Lens) On photographing conflict for the first time

Russia Beyond the Headlines: Yuri Kozyrev: Walking the revolution road 

photo: Franco Pagetti

Telegraph: Baptism of fire: the story of the VII photo agency (Telegraph) When seven photojournalists decided to join forces, it was just days before 9/11 happened. Their role has been in sharp focus ever since

Gizmodo: How to Be a Citizen Journalist Without Getting Killed

Flavorwire:  A Look at Patti Smith’s First Major Photography Exhibition, ‘Camera Solo’

Toronto Star Photo Blog: Rick Madonik tells about his Libyan fixer

Capital New York: For Tim Hetherington’s close friend and ‘Restrepo’ subjects, mounting a South Bronx gallery show of the late photographer’s work becomes a tribute

PDN: What do you charge for editorial retouching, and how? (PDN)

Telegraph: Photography at the V&A

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Adnan Abidi 

New Yorker Photo Booth:  Great Mistakes, Vanessa Winship’s favorite accidental photo

IJNet: Five Google tools journalists don’t use but should

Source: Top Ten Tips on getting the most of your photography degree

Penumbra Project: Surviving as a photographer in the new economy

photo: Eli Reed

Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 3 (IdeasTap)

Joerg Colberg: What Happened to the Mid-Career Artist (Conscientious)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.23: Gaddafi’s death

David Campbell: Agencies as publishers: a new approach to photojournalism (DC blog)

Marco Bohr: Google Street View and the Politics of Exploitation (Visual Culture Blog)

Verve: Valerio Bispuri (Verve)

Also in new breed of documentary photographers.. Chien Chi-Chang (Verve)… ahem…

Guardian: Occupy London empty tent claims based on ‘rubbish science’  (Guardian) Scientist specialising in camouflage said photographers with thermal imaging equipment were not using right camera settings

Adam Westbrook: 10 common video storytelling mistakes (and how to avoid them) (AW blog)

Adam McCauley: Covering 9/11 with Ashley Gilbertson (Storify)

BJP: The Third Floor Gallery is Cardiff is looking for £12,000 to expand

BJP: Spotlight on crowdfunding: Photographer Neil Osborne is raising funds to document how one man saved the Black Turtle

BJP: The London Street Photography Festival + Grant Smith to present “Stand Your Ground” at BJP’s Vision

BJP: The Open Eye Gallery is reopening in new premises. BJP asks the director and curator what we can expect to see

Petapixel: Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Videos

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #3

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #2

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #1

Page One : Inside The New York Times : trailer

Vicki Bennett: Deconstructing the way we perceive space in cinema (Contact Editions)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Andrea Morales Wins TIME’s Next Generation Photography Contest | Morales’ website

FotoVisura Grant. The deadline is December 5, 2011.

PhotoPhilantrophy Grant Rounds Schedule

Blogs

NPPA Visual Student

Crowd funding

Go and support my friend Amanda’s project…She’s already past the halfway mark…

Amanda Rivkin : BTC Oil Pipeline (Emphas.is)

Events and Exhibitions


Giles Duley : Becoming the Story : Artist Talk: Wednesday 2 November 6-9pm (talk starts at 7pm) Private View: Thursday 3 November  7 – 9pm Exhibition Runs: 4 – 26 November : KK Outlet : London

Hell and Back Again by Danfung Dennis : Screening : November 7 :  Foto8 :  London

Amazon : exhibition in aid of Sky Rainforest Rescue : Somerset House, London :  photography from Sebastião Salgado and Per Anders Pettersson

Magnum Photos symposium to discuss the role of contact sheets in photograph :  26 November : London

The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar

Jobs

MediaStorm’s Spring Internship : Deadline November 1

B&H is hiring a full-time Photo Related Blogger

NPR : assistant producer for multimedia

Reuters freelance TV news producer

Agencies and Collectives

Statement Images is looking for new members

Zeppelin

Photographers

Suzanne Lee

Jussi Puikkonen

Tania Lee Crow

As a final note… Busiest day so far on the blog last Friday with 2,870 views and looks like October is on its way of becoming to be the month with most traffic ever…around 37,000 views…Thanks for visiting.

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Edward Burtynsky while on location in Spain, 2010.

“I’m always interested in how humans shape the landscape,” says photographer Edward Burtynsky, a master at documenting the effects of industry on the nature for more than 20 years. “All my work is really about the pristine landscape being pushed back as a result of the expanding human footprint. And I kept thinking of farming as one of the largest terraforming events that humans have exercised on the planet.”

That interest is the inspiration behind Dryland Farming—on view at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery—one of two exhibitions paying tribute to Burtynsky’s career in New York City this fall. The other, on display at Howard Greenberg Gallery, takes a broader, retrospective look at the photographer’s 25-year career.

Dryland Farming features topographic landscape images from the Monegros region in northeastern Spain that the photographer shot from a helicopter about 2,000 feet above. “The colors and the shapes were like nothing I’d ever seen before,” Burtynsky says. “It reminded me of the abstract paintings of the 20th century, like [Pablo] Picasso’s Guernica.”

Burtynsky photographed the series in 2010, and the work is part of a larger project called Water, which the lensman began in 2008 and expects to complete in 2013. “I like to take a theme and start building ideas around it and trying to find the visual correlations to those ideas,” Burtynsky says. “Water was an interesting one to try to capture visually, especially if you look at agriculture in all its different forms as a subject that relates to water. The incredible farms and farming methodology in the Monegros region in Spain were certainly a huge part of that.”

Dryland Farming will be on view at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York from Oct. 26-Dec. 10. The Howard Greenberg Gallery exhibition in New York is on view from Oct. 27-Dec.10.

Feifei Sun is a reporter at TIME. Find her on Twitter at @Feifei_Sun or on Facebook. You can also continue the discussion on TIME’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

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Libya didn’t simply fall at the end; it rather slid from the hands that had gripped onto it for far too long. It was taken back and returned to its rightful owners.

In the six months before my second return to Libya this September, after the fall of Tripoli, I had seen the way things would finally end through a romantic kaleidoscope. I wanted to celebrate in the square after finding my family in the crowd. I wanted to be my father’s son. I wanted that gap I have felt from Libya my entire life to at once close. With this uprooting of the regime in Libya, I felt whatever huge hole was left was now filled with a complex melody of emotions. I had not expected anything short of jubilation, and never had the impulse of reflection been a part of this plan for me. Before I had a chance to acknowledge the transition, it was already complete and it gave way to an incredible sense of pride. The rebels had brought the regime to the ledge, but it was the people who would be the final push.

At the time, the city celebrated but the country seemed exhausted. I had been afraid of the capital spiraling into chaos following the fall, but instead everything seemed to have taken its place. People went to work and took up positions to help attend to the city’s wounds—as if all Libyans had been rehearsing for this moment their entire lives. People grasped their roles at this moment and took hold of the importance of civility. During a visit to a hospital one day, a man explained to me simply, “We all have our jobs now. As a Libyan, you have your job here, and it is important. You do your job and I’ll do mine.”

I felt as though I needed that clear point of departure to help finally tether together these loose ends I had felt my entire life. In the end, all those emotions I had reserved for that anticipated moment were nowhere to be found. A kind of paralysis took hold instead. The previous expectations would pale in comparison to how this unexpected state would leave me. Joy was replaced with anger and clarity with haze. What became clear was that this hadn’t been my war as much as it had been for the rest of Libya.

To me, the regime was like an ominous vapor. While their fighters were not visible on the streets any longer, evidence of their lethal effect was very present, and as they fled, they left in their tracks a deep gash in the country and its people.

The personal conflict I felt during this time brought me to a point where my relation to breaking news played less an immediate role in my work than trying to restore my connection during a period when so much was unclear and surreal. Memories near and far rushed forward and I felt I needed to step back before the whole thing engulfed me. I had a clear reason for being there. More than one, in fact, and I wanted to get a hold of whatever I was experiencing and work towards a clearer picture. That image only became focused once I paused and allowed that nostalgia to catch up with me. It was an unconscious choice to proceed forward only when something made sense to me and I felt it somehow fit into this puzzle I was building. I realized that a middle distance was missing. The gap between me and what I was here to see was gone and I felt pushed up against this giant shift. I was able to see everything clearly. I needed that minor space to objectify this moment just enough to try and grasp it but I was immediately enveloped instead. As if all the oxygen in that needed breathing room was extinguished and a vacuum pulled everything from inside of me.

Much of what I became transfixed with might otherwise have seemed banal to some though it had a relevant place in processing this event. Whether it was the discarded green flags of the regime being slowly devoured by the elements, or the simplest gesture that suggested a great relief within this new absence in the country.

While the experience of this past return lent little to fully realizing how I had expected things to play out, everything in fact eventually did play out. The insignificance of those dreams had never been so clear once seeing and feeling the collective sigh of relief the country let out.

Jehad Nga is a Libyan photographer who lives in New York. See more of his work here.

To read Nga’s piece about his father’s life in 1960′s Libya, before the Gaddafi regime, click here

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As a gay man who came out at a young age—14, to be exact—photographer Ryan Pfluger was both excited and anxious about photographing the students at Milwaukee’s Alliance School, the only gay-friendly charter school in the U.S. that starts enrolling students in sixth grade. During this assignment, Pfluger, who says he grew up as “the only gay kid in a macho Italian suburb” of New York City, kept thinking about whether as a teenager he would have preferred to attend a school like Alliance, where about half the students identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, but nearly all have been bullied or harassed at their previous schools. “I would have loved this at age 12 or 13 when I felt uncomfortable with who I was. I didn’t feel safe. I didn’t have people who understood me,” he says. “But looking back on it now as an adult — those experiences I had in high school shaped me to be who I am now. They made me the headstrong person I am now.”

Pfluger raises a point that is the central question surrounding Alliance and other schools like it: Is it better to let gay students self-segregate in a cocoon of tolerance, or have them suffer as mainstream schools struggle to reduce bullying? “I worry that this school is a Band-Aid for them and the reality of life is going to hit them when they leave,” Pfluger says. “That was the hardest part for me. This stuff they’re feeling isn’t going to change because they are in a special school — it’s only better when you make it better.”

Still, for some bullying victims, the school is nothing short of a lifeline. Pfluger says he could see the benefits of attending a school like Alliance most vividly when he took a photo of eleventh grader, Robbie Moore, holding hands with Jayde LaPorte, a transgendered ninth grader. “Those two were bonded in a way that was really special,” he says. “I could tell immediately how safe they felt with each other.”

That kind of support — and inclusiveness — is the goal at Alliance. Instead of being tormented, Jayde and Robbie can walk tall, in heels or whatever else they feel like wearing. Says Alliance’s founder and lead teacher, Tina Owen: “I always felt like these kids could survive in other places, but they could thrive here.”

Ryan Pfluger is a Brooklyn-based photographer. See more of his work here.

Kayla Webley is a Writer-Reporter at TIME. Find her on Twitter at @kaylawebley or on Facebook. You can also continue the discussion on TIME’s Facebook page and on Twitter at @TIME.

MORE: Read the full story on the Alliance School in TIME Magazine here.

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Coming of age for Swazi girls is tough. A tiny African nation of one million, Swaziland is ruled by one of the world’s last remaining absolute monarchies. Its age-old tradition of polygamy and its relaxed attitude toward sexuality have met in a devastating combination for women: Swaziland reports the highest percentage of HIV positive people in the world, with young women being affected most. Half of young Swazi women are HIV positive, and life expectancy has dropped from 61 years to almost 31 years over the past ten years.

Every year, young maidens from across the country gather for the Umhlanga dance, an eight-day ceremony in honor of the Queen Mother to celebrate their virginity. I first went to Swaziland in 2006 to document this annual dance and other coming of age rites of young women living amid a spreading disease and its victims—women who, even in the face of such staggering odds and deep uncertainty, still possess all the energy and enthusiasm of youth. My goal was to capture the nuances that comprise a human, rather than simply tragic, experience.

Over the past five years, the progression of this work has moved from traditional rites of passage to modern youth culture to an intimate look inside the homes of HIV-positive women. My insights have matured along with these young women. It has allowed me to witness fast-tracked intimacy and friends lost and gained. It has made me see that girls here are constantly on the verge––of giving birth to burying best friends, of finding love to fighting for life alone, stigmatized and heartbroken.

These moments in my interactions with young Swazi women remind me of the complicated, frustrating, and deeply human nature of their predicaments, choices and desires. I’ve seen childhood friends reconnect across beds in a hospice, one of which was fighting the inevitable with her lone T-cell—her “one soldier.” I’ve watched innumerable women leave their rural homes to look for nonexistent work near the city, knowing that they will make easy prey for older men who will support them for sex. I’ve photographed a young HIV-positive woman who refuses to take medication out of fear it would indicate to others her impending death. Instead, she tells me about her dreams of joining the army to earn “money like dust” to support herself and her newborn child, joking in the same breath about how she probably won’t make it to twenty and see me on my next trip back. It is difficult to comprehend how she so easily accepts the contradictions in her life. That her own mother is too scared to tell her daughter or any of her friends that she herself has started anti-retroviral treatment—out of fear of gossip and isolation—seems to underscore the frustrating reality that for every step forward, there is a step back.

And that’s the thing: there isn’t a single story, just frustrating inconsistencies. Yet on each trip, I still find a sense of hope for what the future might hold, even as they navigate this narrow bridge between life and death.

Krisanne Johnson has been working on long-term personal projects about young women and HIV/AIDS in Swaziland and post-apartheid South African youth culture since 2006. Her work has appeared in various publications, including TIME, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times, among others. I Love You Real Fast is on display through Nov. 26 at The Half King in New York City. 

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