Skip navigation
Help

Nelson Mandela

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Mikko Takkunen

Features and Essays

Rena Effendi / INSTITUTE  for National Geographic

Rena Effendi / National Geographic

Rena Effendi: Transylvania Hay Country (National Geographic)  The old art of making hay on the grass-growing meadows of Transylvania | from the July issue of National Geographic magazine | Effendi’s agency

Ami Vitale: Montana Ranch (Photo Booth)  A testament to a disappearing way of life and an ode to its endurance.

Rena Effendi: Spirit Lake (Institute) Located in an isolated and economically languishing area of North Dakota, Spirit Lake is a Sioux Indian reservation home to some 6,200 inhabitants

Raphaela Rosella: Teen Mothers in Australia (Feature Shoot)

Giorgos Moutafis

Giorgos Moutafis

Giorgos Moutafis: Istanbul’s Taksim Square (Photo Booth) Moutafis’s website

Guy Martin: Turmoil in Istanbul: Turkey’s Gezi Park Protests (LightBox) Full edit on Panos Pictures here

Guillaume Herbaut: Unrest in Turkey (Institute)

LouLou d’Aki: Occupy Istanbul: Portraits of Turkey’s Protest Kids (NY magazine)

Enri Canaj

Enri Canaj

Enri Canaj: City of Shadows (Foto8) Athens, Greece

Yannis Behrakis: Homelessness in Greece (Guardian) Related on Reuters photoblog here

Lauren Greenfield: The Fast and The Fashionable (ESPN) In Monaco during F1 Grand Prix

Giovanni Cocco: The Life Of A Sibling With Disability (NPR Picture Show)

Riverboom: Giro d’Italia (Institute)

Robert Nickelsberg: Surviving Cold War (World Policy) Forces from Norway, Britain, and the Netherlands in training in the planet’s harshest climate in the Arctic Circle

Diana Markosian

Diana Markosian

Diana Markosian: My Father, The Stranger (NYT) Markosian writes about her father here | Related on the NYT Lens blog here

Ian Willms: Following in the Mennonites’ Footsteps (LightBox)

Tomasz Lazar: In Kosovo, Bridging an Ethnic Divide (NYT)

Cathal McNaughton: Yarnbombers (Guardian) Photographer Cathal McNaughton has caught up with the Yarnbombers, the guerrilla knitters who plan to target the G8 using knitting or crochet rather than graffiti

Sebastian Liste / Reportage by Getty Images for TIME

Sebastian Liste / Reportage by Getty Images for TIME

Sebastian Liste: On the Inside: Venezuela’s Most Dangerous Prison (LightBox)

Pietro Paolini: Ecuador: Balance on the Zero (Terra Project)

Elizabeth Griffin and Amelia Coffaro: Capturing Life With Cancer At Age 28 (NPR Picture Show)

Lars Tunbjörk: Cremation: The New American Way of Death (LightBox)

Lucas Jackson: Tornado survivors of Moore (Reuters photo blog) multimedia

Andy Levin: Coney Island (NYT Lens)

Daniel Love: 200 Hours (Guardian)

Robert Herman: New York: A View of Inner Turmoil (NYT Lens)

Reed Young: The Ground Zero of Immigration: El Paso (LightBox)

Sara Lewkowicz: An unflinching look at domestic abuse (CNN photo blog)

Tony Fouhse: The Simple View of Ottawa (NYT Lens)

Justin Jin for the New York Times

Justin Jin for the New York Times

Justin Jin: A Chinese Push for Urbanization (NYT)

Sean Gallagher: Climate change on the Tibetan plateau (Guardian) audio slideshow

Nic Dunlop: On the frontlines of a ‘Brave New Burma’ (CNN photo blog)

Zohra Bensemra: Pakistan’s female Top Gun (Reuters)

Paolo Marchetti: The Stains of Kerala (LightBox)

Behrouz Mehri / AFP / Getty Images

Behrouz Mehri / AFP / Getty Images

Behrouz Mehri: Life in Tehran, glimpsed through the rear window (AFP Correspondent)

Tyler Hicks: A New Strategy on One Syrian Front (NYT)

Laurent Van der Stockt: On The Damascus Front Lines (Le Monde)

Jason Larkin: Suez – Egypt’s Lifeline (Panos Pictures)

Nyani Quarmyne: Bridging Approaches to Mental Illness in Sierra Leone (NYT Lens)

Jake Naughton: Education of Girls in Kibera (Feature Shoot)

David Guttenfelder: Last Song for Migrating Birds (NGM) Across the Mediterranean, millions are killed for food, profit, and cruel amusement.

Nick Cobbing: Follow the Creatures (Photographer’s website) Antarctica

Nelli Palomäki: Portraits of Children (LightBox)

Articles

AP Explore

AP Explore

The Burning Monk 50th anniversary (AP) Malcolm Wilde Browne was 30 years old when he arrived in Saigon on Nov. 7, 1961, as AP’s first permanent correspondent there. From the start, Browne was filing the kind of big stories that would win him the Pulitzer Prize for reporting in 1964. But today, he is primarily remembered for a photograph taken 50 years ago on June 11, 1963, depicting the dignified yet horrific death by fiery suicide of Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc.

Malcolm Browne: The Story Behind The Burning Monk (LightBox)

Love struck: Photographs of JFK’s visit to Berlin 50 years ago reveal a nation instantly smitten (The Independent) Photographer Ulrich Mack accompanied Kennedy on the entire trip. The results, published this month as Kennedy in Berlin, have mostly never been seen before

Osman Orsal / Reuters

Osman Orsal / Reuters

Images of Protest in Istanbul: The Woman in Red (No Caption Needed)

Turkey’s “Lady in Red” and the Importance of Professional Photographers (NPPA)

The photo that encapsulates Turkey’s protests and the severe police crackdown (Washington Post)

‘Woman in red’ sprayed with teargas becomes symbol of Turkey protests (Guardian)

Photographer documents Istanbul ‘war zone’ in his own backyard on Facebook (NBC News photo blog)

Photographic Mood, on the Eve of Destruction (No Caption Needed)

Photographer Injured in Istanbul Protests (PDN)

Pixelating the reality? (Al Jazeera: Listening Post) Photography is a subjective medium, and how it is used will always depend on who is using it. | On Paul Hansen’s World Press Photo of the Year and post-processing in photojournalism in general

The Art of War – Ron Haviv (Viewpoint on Vimeo) A documentary from the public television of Greece, year 2013. Language: English | Greek Subtitles

Leading photojournalist captures the beating heart of a brutal world (Sydney Morning Herald) Forty years of covering atrocities has only reinforced James Nachtwey’s faith in humanity

Rita Leistner: Looking for Marshall McLuhan in Afghanistan (BagNewsNotes)

Profile of a Curatorial Master: Yolanda Cuomo (LightBox)

A Glance at the 2013 LOOK3 Photo Festival (LightBox)

Edouard Elias / Getty Images

Edouard Elias / Getty Images

Two journalists, including photographer Edouard Elias, abducted in Syria (BJP) According to Le Monde and BBC News, the two journalists, Didier François and Edouard Elias, were travelling to Aleppo in Syria when they were abducted by four armed men at a checkpoint 

Syrian teacher turned war photographer (CNN) Nour Kelze describes her transition from English teacher in Aleppo to war photographer in the middle of Syria’s conflict.

Frontline Freelance Register created to help freelance war reporters (BJP)

Margaret Bourke-White’s Damaged Negatives From a Classic Assignment (LIFE)

A Paean to Forbearance (the Rough Draft) (NYT) The origins behind James Agee’s 1941 book, “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men,” a literary description of abject poverty in the South, accompanied by Walker Evans photographs.

In pictures: Saul Leiter’s pioneering colour photography (BBC)

Ageing and creative decline in photography: a taboo subject (BJP)

The Woman in a Jim Crow Photo (NYT Lens)

Abigail Heyman, Feminist Photojournalist, Dies at 70 (NYT) Related

Denver photographer Steven Nickerson who shocked, awed, dead at 55 (Denver Post)

Bolivar Arellano’s Photos for El Diario-La Prensa (NYT Lens)

Nelson Mandela: a life in focus (Guardian) Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Greg Marinovich reflects on a legend of our time

Eman Mohammed in the Gaza Strip (Denver Post Plog)

Robert Capa’s vintage prints on show (BBC) To mark what would have been the 100th birthday of photographer Robert Capa, the Atlas gallery in London is holding an exhibition of his work. It comprises a wide range of prints from his time in Spain during the Civil War through World War II, and ending with the Indo China conflict where he lost his life.

Uzbek migrant workers in Kazakhstan

Chloe Dewe Mathews

Chloe Dewe Mathews’s best photograph – Uzbek migrant workers (Guardian)

Featured photographer: Scout Tufankjian (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Carlo Gianferro (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Antonia Zennaro (Verve Photo)

Deutsche Börse photography prize 2013 won by Broomberg and Chanarin (Guardian)

American Girls: Photographs Offer Vision into American Girlhood (Daily Beast) Polish photographer Ilona Szwarc’s new exhibit captures 100 kids with their cult-classic toy, the American Girl doll.

Northern Ireland: 30 Years of Photography by Colin Graham – review (Guardian) This catalogue of recent Northern Irish photography shows a determination to leave the documentary style of the Troubles behind

After Lowry (FT magazine) Landscape photographer John Davies takes a series of pictures in the northwest of England inspired by the work of LS Lowry

Eric Maierson: This is what editing feels like (MediaStorm blog)

Yunghi Kim: Protecting Our Images (NPPA)

I Spy: Photographer who secretly snapped neighbors goes to court (Yahoo)

Beyonce Photoshopped Into Starvation for Latest Ad Campaign (PetaPixel)

Interviews and Talks

C-SPAN

C-SPAN

Rodrigo Abd and Javier Manzano (C-Span)

Carolyn Drake (cestandard) An interview with Carolyn Drake, author of Two Rivers

Paul Conroy (Amanpour) The deadliest country on earth for journalists | Conroy on Marie Colvin’s last assignment

Alex Webb (LA Times Framed)

Christopher Anderson (GUP magazine)

Stuart Franklin (Vice) There’s More to Stuart Franklin Than the Most Famous Photo of the 20th Century

Paula Bronstein / Getty Images

Paula Bronstein / Getty Images

Paula Bronstein (ABC Radio National Australia) Internationally acclaimed US photo journalist Paula Bronstein talks about bearing witness to human suffering through her photo essays.

John H. White (NPR Picture Show) Photo Staff Firings Won’t Shake Pulitzer Winner’s Focus

Joe McNally (NYT Lens) Photographing on Top of the World

David Guttenfelder (NGM) Photographer David Guttenfelder reflects upon why taking pictures of the slaughter of songbirds is like covering a war.

Alexandra Avakian / Contact Press Images

Alexandra Avakian / Contact Press Images

Jean-François Leroy (BJP) Visa pour l’Image organizer on the festival’s editorial line and the cost of covering war

Jean-François Leroy (BJP) Visa pour l’Image organizer on social media, the future of photojournalism and the need for greater cooperation

Marco Di Lauro (Image Deconstructed)

Evgenia Arbugaeva (Leica blog) Leica Oskar Barnack Award Winner 2013

Jenn Ackerman (PBS NewsHours) One Photographer’s Experience Documenting Mentally Ill Inmates

Richard Misrach (PDN Pulse) Misrach on Documentary vs. Art, the Complications of Portraiture, and Digital Photography

Daniel Etter / Redux

Daniel Etter / Redux

Daniel Etter (LightBox Tumblr)

Espen Rasmussen (Panos Social)

Michael Christopher Brown (Window magazine)

Terry O’Neill (WSJ) The photographer on starlets, the Stones and Sinatra

Ewen Spencer (Vice) The Soul of UK Garage, As Photographed by Ewen Spencer

Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.

0
Your rating: None

Main

Obama’s in the news a lot, partly because he’s kind of in charge of the world, and partly because he’s outrageously photogenic. Bear in mind it takes a lot more than good-looks to be photogenic — being completely comfortable in your own skin, having great style and being in interesting places helps a lot too, which in Obama’s case is not difficult.

Read more

Advertise here via BSA

0
Your rating: None

  

You’ve presented the new website and everyone loves it. The design is crisp, the code is bug-free, and you’re ready to release. Then someone asks, “Does it work in Japanese?”

You break out in a cold sweat: you have no idea. The website works in English, and you figured other languages would come later. Now you have to rework the whole app to support other languages. Your release date slips, and you spend the next two months fixing bugs, only to find that you’ve missed half of them.

Localization makes your application ready to work in any language — and it’s much easier if you do it from the beginning. Just follow these 12 simple rules and you’ll be ready to run anywhere in the world.

1. “Resource” All Of Your Strings

The first step of localization is to get user-visible strings out of your code and into resource files. Those strings include titles, product names, error messages, strings in images and any other text the user might see.

Most resource files work by giving each string a name and allowing you to specify different translation values for that string. Many languages use properties files like this:

name = Username

Or they use .pot files like this:

msgid "Username"
msgstr "Nom d'utilisateur"

Or they use XLIFF files like this:

<trans-unit id="1">
 <source xml:lang="en">Username</source>
 <target xml:lang="fr">Nom d'utilisateur</target>
</trans-unit>

The resource files are then loaded by a library that uses a combination of the language and country, known as the locale, to identify the right string.

Once you’ve placed your strings in external resource files, you can send the files to translators and get back translated files for each locale that your application supports.

2. Never Concatenate Strings

Appending one string to another almost always results in a localization bug. It’s easy to see this with modifiers such as color.

Suppose your stationery store has items such as pencils, pens and sheets of paper. Shoppers will choose what they want and then select a color. In the shopping cart you would show them items such as a red pencil or a blue pen with a function like this:

function getDescription() {
    var color = getColor();
    var item = getItem();

    return color + " " + item;
}

This code works well in English, in which the color comes first, but it breaks in French, in which “red pencil” translates as “crayon rouge” and “blue pen” is “stylo – encre bleue.” French speakers (but not only them) put modifiers after the words they modify. The getDescription function would never be able to support languages like this with simple string concatenation.

The solution is to specify parametrized strings that change the order of the item and color for each language. Define a resourced string that looks like this:

itemDescription = {0} {1}

It might not look like much, but this string makes the translation possible. We can use it in a new getDescription function, like this:

function getDescription() {
    var color = getColor();
    var item = getItem();

    return getLocalizedString('itemDescription', color, item);
}

Now, your translators can easily switch the order, like this:

itemDescription = {1} {0}

The getLocalizedString function here takes the name of a resource string (itemDescription) and some additional parameters (color and item) to substitute for placeholders in the resource string. Most programming languages provide a function similar to getLocalizedString. (The one notable exception is JavaScript, but we’ll talk more about that later.)

This method also works for strings with text in them, like:

invalidUser = The username {0} is already taken. Please choose another one.

3. Put All Of Your Punctuation In The Resourced String

Tacking on punctuation later is often tempting, so that you can reuse the same string, say, in a label where it needs a colon and in a tooltip where it doesn’t. But this is another example of bad string concatenation.

Here, we’re adding a simple log-in form using PHP in a WordPress environment:

<form>
<p>Username: <input type="text" name="username"></p>
<p>Password: <input type="text" name="password"></p>
</form>

We want the form to work in other languages, so let’s add the strings for localization. WordPress makes this easy with the __ function (i.e. underscore underscore):

<form>
<p><?php echo(__('Username', 'my-plugin') ?>: <input type="text" name="username"></p>
<p><?php echo(__('Password', 'my-plugin') ?>: <input type="text" name="password"></p>
</form>

Spot the bug? This is another case of string concatenation. The colon after the labels isn’t localized. This will look wrong in languages such as French and Russian, which always put spaces around colons. Punctuation is part of the string and belongs in the resource file.

<form>
<p><?php echo(__('Username:', 'my-plugin') ?> <input type="text" name="username"></p>
<p><?php echo(__('Password:', 'my-plugin') ?> <input type="text" name="password"></p>
</form>

Now the form can use Username: in English and Nom d'utilisateur : in French.

4. “First” Names Sometimes Aren’t

My name is Zack Grossbart. Zack is my given (or first) name, and Grossbart is my last (or family) name. Everyone in my family is named Grossbart, but I’m the only Zack.

In English-speaking countries, the first name is the given name and the last name is the family name. Most Asian countries go the other way, and some cultures have only one name.

The cellist Yo-Yo Ma is a member of the Ma family. In Chinese, he writes his family name first: Ma Yo-Yo (馬友友).

This gets tricky because many people change their names when moving from Asian countries to English-speaking ones. They often switch the order to fit local customs, so you can’t make any assumptions.

You must provide a way to customize the presentation of names; you can’t assume that the first name always comes first or that the last name always comes last.

WordPress handles this pretty well by asking you how you want your name to show up:

Name formatting in WordPress

It would be even better if WordPress supported a middle name and a way to specify the format per locale so that you could make your name one way in English and another in Chinese, but nothing’s perfect.

5. Never Hard-Code Date, Time Or Currency Formats

The whole world is inconsistent about date and time formats. Some people put the month first (6/21/2012), others the day first (21/6/2012). Some use 24-hour (14:00) time, and some use 12 (2:00 PM). Taiwan uses specially translated strings instead of AM and PM, and those come first (上午 2:00).

Your best bet is to store all dates and times in a standard format such as ISO time or epoch time, and to use a library like Date.js or Moment.js to format them for the given locale. These libraries can also handle converting the time to the current zone, so you can store all dates and times in a common format on the server (such as UTC) and convert them to the right time zone in the browser.

Dates and times are also tricky when displaying calendars and date pickers. Estonia starts the week on Saturday, the US starts on Sunday, the UK on Monday and the Maldives on Friday. The jQuery UI date picker includes over 50 localized files to support different calendar formats around the world.

The same is true of currencies and other number formats. Some countries use commas to separate numbers, and others use periods. Always use a library with localized files for each of the locales that you need to support.

StackOverflow covers this topic well when discussing daylight savings time and time zone best practices.

6. Use UTF-8 Almost All Of The Time

The history of computer character encodings is a long one, but the most important thing to remember is that UTF-8 is the right choice 99% of the time. The only time not to use UTF-8 is when you’re working primarily with Asian languages and absolutely need the efficiency of UTF-16.

This comes up a lot with Web applications. If the browser and the server don’t use the same character encoding, then the characters will get corrupted and your application will fill up with little squares and question marks.

Many programming languages store files using the system’s default encoding, but it won’t matter that your server is English when all of your users are browsing in Chinese. UTF-8 fixes that by standardizing the encodings across the browser and the server.

Invoke UTF-8 at the top of all of your HTML pages:

<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">

And specify UTF-8 in the HTTP Content-Type header, like this:

Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8

The JSON specification requires that all JSON documents use Unicode with a default of UTF-8, so make sure to use UTF-8 whenever you’re reading or writing data.

7. Give Strings Room To Grow And Shrink

Strings change size in translation.

Repeat password example

“Repeat password” is over 50% wider in German than in English; if there isn’t enough space, then your strings will overlap other controls. WordPress solves this problem by leaving extra space after each label for the string to grow.

Label spacing in the WordPress admin

This works well for languages whose strings are roughly of the same length, but for languages with long words, such as German and Finnish, the controls will overlap if you don’t leave enough space. You could add more space, but that would put the labels and controls pretty far apart from each other in compact languages such as Chinese, thus making them hard to use.

Label spacing in the WordPress admin in Chinese

Many designers of forms give their labels room to grow and shrink by aligning them to the right or by placing them above the controls.

Label above controls in the WordPress admin

Putting labels above the controls works well for a short form, but it makes a form with a lot of fields very tall.

There’s no perfect answer for how to make your application work in all languages; many form designers mix and match these approaches. Short labels like “User name” and “Role” won’t change much in translation and need just a little extra space. Longer paragraphs will change substantially and need room to grow wider, taller or sometimes both.

Label next to and above controls in the WordPress admin

Here, WordPress gives a little extra space for the “Biographical Info” label, but it puts the longer description below the field so that it can grow in translation.

8. Always Use A Full Locale

The full locale includes the language and country code, and it supports alternate spellings, date formats and other differences between two countries with a shared language.

Always use a full locale instead of just a language when translating, so that you know whether you’re doing someone a favor or a favour, and that they know whether to take the elevator or the lift, and that they know whether £100.00 is expensive.

9. Never Trust The Browser To Know The Right Locale

Localization is much more difficult with browsers and JavaScript because they give a different locale depending on who’s asking.

JavaScript has a property to tell you the current language, named navigator.userLanguage. All browsers support it, but it’s generally useless.

If I install Firefox in English, then my navigator.userLanguage value would say English. I can then go into my preferences and change my preferred languages. Firefox lets me select multiple languages, so I could specify my order of preference as English from the US, then any other English, then Japanese.

Language preferences in Firefox

Specifying a set of locales makes it possible for servers to find the best match between the languages that I know they support. Firefox takes these locales and sends them to the server in an HTTP header, like this:

Accept   en-us,en;q=0.7,ja;q=0.3

Firefox even uses the quality factor (that q= part) to indicate how much I prefer one locale over another.

This means that the server might return content in English or Japanese or another language if it doesn’t support either. However, even after I’ve set my preferred language in Firefox, the value of my navigator.userLanguage property will still be English and only English. The other browsers don’t do much better. This means that I might end up with the server thinking I want Japanese and with the JavaScript thinking I want English.

JavaScript has never solved this problem, and it has not one standard localization library, but dozens of different standards. The best solution is to embed a JavaScript property or some other field in your page that indicates the locale when the server processes each request. Then you can use that locale when formatting any strings, dates or numbers from JavaScript.

10. Plan For Languages That Read Left To Right And Right To Left

Most languages are written on screen from left to right, but Arabic, Hebrew and plenty of others go from right to left. HTML provides a property for the html element named dir that indicates whether the page is ltr (left to right) or rtl (right to left).

<html dir="rtl">

There’s also a direction property in CSS:

input {
    direction: rtl;
}

Setting the direction property will make the page work for the standard HTML tags, but it can’t switch a CSS element with float: left to float: right or change an absolutely positioned layout. To make more complex layouts work, you will need a new style sheet.

An easy way to determine the direction of the current language is to include a direction string in the resourced strings.

direction = rtl

Then you can use that string to load a different style sheet based on the current locale.

11. Never Sort In The Browser

JavaScript provides a sort function that arranges lists of strings alphabetically. It works by comparing each character in each string to determine whether a is greater than b or y is less than z. That’s why it makes 40 come before 5.

The browser knows that y comes before z by using a large mapping table for each character. However, the browser includes the mapping tables only in the current locale. This means that if you have a list of Japanese names, the browser wouldn’t be able to sort them properly in an English locale; it would just sort them by Unicode value, which isn’t correct.

This problem is easy to see in languages such as Polish and Vietnamese, which frequently use diacritical marks. The browser can tell that a comes before b, but it doesn’t know whether comes before ã.

The only place to sort strings properly is on the server. Make sure that the server has all of the code mappings for the languages you support, and that you send lists to the browser presorted, and that you call the server whenever you want to change the sorting. Also, make sure that the server takes locale into account for sorting, including right-to-left locales.

12. Test Early And Often

Most teams don’t worry about localization until it’s too late. A big customer in Asia will complain that the website doesn’t work, and everyone will scramble to fix 100 little localization bugs that they had never thought of. Following the rules in this article will avoid many of those problems, but you will still need to test; and translations usually aren’t ready until the end of the project.

I used to translate my projects into Pig Latin, but that didn’t test Asian characters, and most browsers don’t support it. Now I create test translations with Xhosa (xh_ZA). All browsers support Xhosa, and Nelson Mandela speaks it natively, but I’ve never been asked to support it in a product.

I don’t speak Xhosa, so I create a new translation file and add xh to the beginning and end of every string. The xh makes it easy to see whether I’ve missed a string in the code. Throw in a few Japanese Kanji characters to test character encoding, and I have a messy string that tests for all of my translation issues.

Making the test translation file is easy. Just save a new properties file with xh_ZA in the file name and turn…

name = Username

… into:

name = xh吳清源Username吳清源xh

The resulting jumble will test that I’ve resourced every string, that I’m using the right locale, that my forms work with longer strings and that I’m using the right character set. Then I’ll just quickly scan the application for anything without the xh and fix the bugs before they become urgent issues.

Do the right thing for localization ahead of time, and you’ll save yourself a lot of trouble in the long run.

(al) (km)

© Zack Grossbart for Smashing Magazine, 2012.

0
Your rating: None

The long and legendary supermodel era of the ’90s can be summed up in one gorgeous and distinct photograph: Herb Ritts’ now-iconic shot of Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, Tatjana Patitz and Stephanie Seymour huddled together in the nude.

But the 1989 sitting almost didn’t happen.

As Campbell recalls, Turlington was on a Calvin Klein contract and reportedly wasn’t allowed to participate. “We said, ‘How can you not be in this picture?’” Campbell says. “And she jumped in, and that was it!”

That black-and-white image is just one of nearly 80 photographs on display at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles as part of a new exhibition and book on the photographer. Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, on view through Aug. 12, focuses on the portraits and nudes from Ritts, who documented models, musicians, actresses and other celebrities for magazines such as Interview, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair throughout his career.

“He always had a vision about how he wanted every picture,” Campbell says. “He liked strength in his pictures, and he got you to do things that you never thought you could do. He was very encouraging and would talk to you about a picture first, and slowly get you there to where he wanted. And you’d be amazed that you even could do that. It was always a pleasure working with him. He was a complete gentleman, and I loved every picture he took of me.”

Herb Ritts—© Herb Ritts Foundation

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Campbell first met Ritts in the late ’80s when she was introduced by fellow model Tatitz. She would often stay with him when she visited Los Angeles, and the two later traveled together to South Africa, where Ritts captured the first photograph of the supermodel with former South African president Nelson Mandela. “He was just a really special human being, and someone that I know is dearly missed in fashion—you never see that kind of picture anymore,” Campbell says.

And while many people revere the image of the five supermodels as one of the most famous sittings in fashion photography, Campbell says they had no idea it would become so iconic. “It was just nice for us to be together,” she says. “We rarely get to do pictures together—even to this day—so it was like a catch-up time for us. We got there in the morning, had lunch and then he told us what we were going to do. It was easy—it was always easy with Herb.”

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the book by Paul Martineau is available here.

0
Your rating: None

This SlideShowPro photo gallery requires the Flash Player plugin and a web browser with JavaScript enabled.

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

Marc Shoul

Brakpan

play this essay

Brakpan is a small town that lies on the East Rand of Gauteng, sandwiched between Boksburg, Benoni and Springs. A once-prosperous mining community, today there are pawnshops, roadhouses, mechanics, mini casinos and other day-to-day shops lining the two main roads that slice through the town. Brakpan is like going back in time; so many aspects of the town remind me of old images I have seen of South Africa. Despite all the changes in nearby Johannesburg, Brakpan still goes about its business in much the same way it did before.  There is a lack of modern development. You don’t see Tuscan townhouse complexes or buildings with glass facades. It’s all very simple and straight forward – almost transparent, and this transparency can be seen in the people too. You won’t find any airs or graces, no fancy cappuccino shops, sushi cafes or organic goods in Brakpan.

The town does not seem to have benefited from its gold rush glory days, which spanned between 1911 until the mid 1950’s, and it now has very little to show for its’ past. Today, the once flourishing mining town only pulls out a small portion of gold compared to what it used to generate, and some disused gold mines now only sell rubble.

A second factor that has contributed to Brakpan’s sense of preservation is the development of Carnival Mall and Casino, which conveniently lies just off the highway a few kilometers away from Brakpan Central. All the major chains and retail shops have moved to the mall and, as a result, the town centre has been left untouched and undeveloped, stunting it economically and leaving its inhabitants with little opportunities.

And yet there are many faces to modern Brakpan. Young girls push prams while karaoke competition winners don’t get their promised prizes. Pirated DVD’s get sold on the streets, crippling the nearby video shops that rent out older movies. There is a sense of nostalgia that remains and is reflected in the buildings and in the people. This is a place where you can still enjoy school and church fete’s, rugby matches, old bars, sokkie jols, biker rallies, fishing and braaiing at the Brakpan Dam; all of which are a part of the local’s lives.

Here there is a peacefulness and relaxed country town feel, without the stress about what tomorrow may bring.  The people of Brakpan live in the now but are still bound by the constraints of the past.

The images presented here are printed on Multigrade V1 FB Fibre matt photographic paper. Exhibition prints are 40cm by 40cm in size in an edition of 10.

Bio

Marc Shoul lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa. He was born in 1975 in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, South Africa and graduated (with honors in photography) from the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in 1999. Since then, he has had several exhibitions of his work including group shows at the Arts Association of Bellville, Fusion (1999), Artscape, Mental Health, (2001) Cape Town, Month of Photography, Detour, (2002), Cape Town, Photo ZA, Obsess (2004) and Resolution Gallery, Faces (2008) in Johannesburg as well as at the World Health Organization TB exhibition in India (2004). Solo exhibitions of ‘Beyond Walmer’ were held by the Association of Visual Arts Gallery in Cape Town (2000) and Natal Society of Arts, Durban (2001).  “Flatlands” a solo exhibition was also held at the Association of Visual Arts in Cape Town (2009) with help from the National Arts Council. Shoul was also featured in the AGFA Youth International Photojournalism Publication 1999. He also reached the finals of the Absa L’Atelier 2009.  Flatlands showed at KZNSA in Durban, South Africa and Galerie Quai 1 in Vevey, Switzerland in 2010. Shoul was invited to hold a workshop at the Vevey School of Photography on the 2010. Shoul was also been included in After A at the Report Atri Festival, Italy, June 2010 curated by Federica Angelucci. Beyond Walmer is on show at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum June-August 2010. Brakpan (work in progress),Shoul has also been included in the Bonaini Africa 2010 Festival of Photography, Cape Town Castle of Good Hope and Museum Africa, Johannesburg. Brakpan (work in progress) was included in 10 a group exhibition at the PhotoMarket Workshop, Johannesburg, 2010. Brakpan in 2011 won the 1st prize at the Winephoto.

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum added “Beyond Walmer” to its permanent collection (2007).

For the last ten years, Marc has worked for various local and international magazines such as Time, Colors, Wired, Blueprint, Dazed and Confused, Design Indaba, World Health Organization, Mother Jones, Stern, Gala, De Spiegel, Financial Times Magazine, Monocle, Smithsonian and The Telegraph Magazine, He has also shot for many advertising clients and agencies.

He has recently completed a project named ‘Flatlands’ in the Johannesburg inner city.  He is now working on a new body of work in Brakpan on the East Rand where he is exploring the city’s way of life and its people.

He is interested in exploring theams of social relevance and changes within his country and further a field.

Shoul works largely in black and white, using a medium format film camera and natural light printed on Fiber photographic paper.

 

Related links

Marc Shoul

0
Your rating: None


TEDxAldeburgh - Nitin Sawhney - What is the point of music?

In this talk Nitin asks the question 'what is the point of music?' For an answer he draws on his own personal experiences of music, Indian musical thought, dance, theatre, cultural identity, the concepts of a 'universal sound' and the individuals unique 'voice'. Nitin Sawhney's output as a musician is astonishing. He has scored for and performed with many of the world's leading orchestras, and collaborated with and written for the likes of Paul McCartney, Sting, The London Symphony Orchestra, AR Rahman, Brian Eno, Sinead O'Conner, Anoushka Shankar, Jeff Beck, Shakira, Will Young, Taio Cruz, Get Cape Wear Cape Fly, Ellie Goulding, Cirque Du Soleil, Akram Khan, Mira Nair, Nelson Mandela and John Hurt. Performing extensively around the world, he has achieved an international reputation across every possible creative medium. Often appearing as Artist in Residence, Curator or Musical Director at international festivals, Sawhney works tirelessly for musical education, acting as patron of the British Government's Access-to-music programme and the East London Film Festival and acting as a judge for The Ivor Novello Awards, BAFTA, BIFA and the PRS foundation. He is a recipient of 4 honorary doctorates from British universities, is a fellow of LIPA and the Southbank University, an Associate of Sadler's Wells, sits on the board for London's Somerset House and Whitechapel Gallery and in 2007 turned down an OBE for ethical reasons. AboutTEDx, x = independently organized event In the <b>...</b>
From:
TEDxTalks
Views:
34

4
ratings
Time:
18:10
More in
Entertainment

0
Your rating: None