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Nicole Tung

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The year 2012 is coming to an end today and I’m sure you have seen plenty of ‘best of ‘ lists already (If you haven’t, you can find a lot of them here), but I couldn’t resist adding one more by sharing my selection of top ten photographs of the year. Trying to make such a tight edit of all the great photojournalism I’ve seen this year was challenging, but I thought ten was a good round number. So here are the top photographs of 2012, as chosen by me, in chronological order.

Lorenzo Meloni’s photograph of two menacing looking militiamen, one in shades and one wearing a balaclava, patrolling the streets of Benghazi in January 2012 stuck in my mind as soon as I saw The Telegraph Magazine run it double truck in May (The tearsheet here). The picture perhaps gains certain extra power also from the fact that we know what went on in Benghazi later on the year.

LorenzoMeloni

Photo © Lorenzo Meloni

Libya. January 2012. – Militiamen patrolling the streets of Benghazi.

Stephanie Sinclair had a great photo essay on Yemen in National Geographic magazine’s September issue (See it here). One of the last photographs of the feature is of a young boy without eyes, cradled by his mother, of whom we don’t  see much more than the very body parts the son is missing. Sinclair’s photo, reminiscent of Samuel Aranda’s World Press Photo of the Year 2011, is powerful in how it shows not only trauma but also love and care.

StephanieSinclair

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Yemen. March 2012. – Cradled by his mother, Saleem al Hazari lost both eyes to a sniper. The 12-year-old was shot when he joined antigovernmental protesters in Sanaa in 2011.

I find Dominic Nahr’s Sudan photo of a soldier lying immersed in oil in Heglig, one of the most striking images of the past year, not only visually but contextually, capturing something very essential of the conflict the two Sudans had in the oil-rich region. (See the photograph larger here)

DominicNahr

Photo © Dominic Nahr – Magnum for TIME

Sudan. 17 April 2012. – A soldier of the northern regime’s army, the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF), lies dead, immersed in oil next to a leaking petroleum facility after heavy fighting with southern SPLA troops after they entered Heglig.

Timothy Fadek had a photo essay on Greece’s economic turmoil on the Foreign Policy website in June (See the series here. NB You might have to create a free login.). The opening picture of drug addicts shooting up in broad daylight shows in strong detail one of the more extreme examples of the human toll the country’s downturn has caused.

TimothyFadek

Photo © Timothy Fadek

Athens, Greece. May 2012. – Scenes from a failing economy. Heroin addicts shoot up behind the Athens Cultural Centeron Akademias Street in central Athens.

Egypt has continued to play a big role in the international news. In June, Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsy was announced as the winner of Egypt’s first democratic presidential election. Below frame, by Daniel Berehulak, of Egyptians celebrating Morsy’s election win, is the one picture with its flags and fireworks, that I remember the most. (See it larger here.)

DanielBerehulak

Photo © Daniel Berehulak – Getty Images

Cairo, Egypt. 24 June 2012.- Egyptians celebrate the election of their new president Mohamed Morsy in Tahrir Square.

Pete Souza has been doing incredible work documenting President Obama’s first term, and it’s difficult to choose his best photo from this past year, but I thought the below picture of Obama sitting in a White House cabinet meeting is an extraordinarily quirky portrayal of the President, taken from an unusual view-point. It shows little more than the chair with a badge identifying who it belongs to, and the President”s back of the head . But I’m sure the head (and the ears!) would be recognisable even without the badge on the chair, but the metal tag does give an air of authority. Amusingly, The Obama campaign tweeted the photo after Clint Eastwood’s infamous empty chair speech at the RNC, with the words ‘This seat’s taken’. I also like how the roundness of the President’s head matches the curves on the wall on the other side of the room.

PeteSouza

Photo © Pete Souza / The White House

Washington D.C., United States. 26 July 2012. – A view from behind of the President as he holds a Cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House.

Nicole Tung did several trips to Syria in 2012 to document the civil war there. Time Lightbox showcased her work on number of occasions. The opening picture of her Aleppo photo essay ‘A Syrian Tragedy: One Family’s Horror’ shows a horrific scene of a group of men carrying a 15-year-old boy, Hatem, who had been trapped under a rubble following an airstrike on 6 August. Hatem later died in the hospital. His father, mother, younger brother and sister and two younger cousins were also killed in the same attack.

I and Olivier Laurent interviewed Nicole Tung about her work later the same month. You can read the interview here.

NicoleTung

Photo © Nicole Tung

Aleppo, Syria. 6 August 2012. – Men carry Hatem Qureya, 15, after he was trapped under rubble following an airstrike in the neighborhood of Bustan al-Qasr in Aleppo, Syria.

Moises Saman has been doing terrific work in Cairo throughout the year. Above, I shared Daniel Berehulak’s picture of Egyptians celebrating their new president. Saman’s photo below shows a very different kind of flag-waving scene, this from the anti-Muslim YouTube video sparked riots directed at the U.S. Embassy in Egypt’s capital. Antonin Kratochvil once said ‘every photographer should have their own version of The Scream’, referring to the similarity of one of his own pictures to the famous Munch painting. If that’s true, I believe Moises Saman now has his. I can see and feel, real raw energy in the young man’s scream below. (See the picture larger here.)

MoisesSaman

Photo © Moises Saman – Magnum

Cairo, Egypt. September 2012. – Protestors shout and raise a flag above a burned-out car near the clashes.

I’ve seen two versions of the below scene. One by Narciso Contreras, whose coverage of the Syrian civil war has probably been the strongest and most comprehensive of any photographer out there, and the one seen here by Javier Manzano. Both are striking photographs, but I just happen to prefer the Manzano one, perhaps as the rays of light are slightly more pronounced in his photo due to the darker exposure.

JavierManzano

Photo © Javier Manzano / AFP

Aleppo, Syria. 18 October 2012. – Two Syrian rebels take sniper positions at the heavily contested neighborhood of Karmal Jabl in central Aleppo.

Out of all the photographs done done during hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, there’s no question in my mind that Iwan Baan’s aerial photograph of the Manhattan powercut, which ran on the cover of the New York Magazine, was the most remarkable and memorable. You can read about the shoot here.

IwanBaan

Photo © Iwan Baan

New York City, United States. 1 November 2012. – Superstorm Sandy aerial shot of Manhattan powercut.

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It was a typical day at one of the hospitals here in Aleppo, a typical three hours, to be even more specific. Children seemed to be everywhere, on hospital beds, in the hospital lobby and waiting with listless faces outside the clinic. Blood seemed to seep through every piece of clothing they had. Some, as young as three, composed themselves as needles pierced their skin to stitch up deep wounds.

Mohamed, 13, tried hard not to cry as he lay on a hospital bed, wincing in pain from the injury he’d sustained after a shell landed near the breadline where he had waited for hours. No one knew he’d been hurt yet and his cousin arrived only thirty minutes later to transfer him to another hospital.

More civilians flooded in, and those who were conscious had a resigned look of acceptance—this was just what happened now these days.

A teenage son, his face smeared in red, collapsed in tears over his father’s body laying on the gurney. He was hit in the head by a bullet, caught in the crossfire as their car made their way through the confusing myriad of streets, unaware of where the snipers or perhaps even the army was. He didn’t seem to register the reality and stared at his father’s bloodied body in disbelief. The doctors bound his father’s hands together and covered him in a blue sheet. They carried his body into the back seat of the car, his feet sticking oddly out of the right window. The boys in the back couldn’t hold it in any longer—as the car pulled away, they wailed.

A man’s body, uncollected by his relatives, lay on a bed in an alley behind the hospital. Another man came rushing in, his eyes wide with fear. In his arms was a bleeding young girl. The hospital staff were all busy attending other civilians and fighters. “What do I do?” he screamed. He was panting, panicking. Someone told him to go to another field hospital. Back in the surgery room, almost easy enough to miss, was an 8-year-old girl who had apparently died in an airstrike. Her body was being wrapped in a shroud and a doctor picked her up to bring her to a waiting taxi.

And minutes later, 15-year-old Fareed was rushed into the hospital. His eyes were wide open as he took deep, labored breaths—his last few before turning motionless. The doctors rushed him to surgery, attempting to resuscitate him. His mother appeared in the lobby, screaming, hyperventilating, crying and grasping at her face in disbelief.

Fareed couldn’t be saved. The little piece of shrapnel had entered his back and passed through his heart—there was nothing the doctors could do here. The hospital had so many needs—for staff, surgeons in particular, and crucial medical equipment like oxygen tanks. It is simultaneously a little house of horrors, and a little house of miracles, where death hangs heavy in the air but every saved life brings a renewed sense of purpose for the doctors.

“I feel a lot of pain inside. A lot of pain, when I see women and children injured. But I have to control myself because I have to help them,” says 28-year-old Abu Ismail, an anesthetist from Aleppo. Abu Ismail wears a black headband with white writing: There is no God but Allah, and Mohamed is his prophet. “This headband gives me strength. I don’t save the lives—Allah does,” he says calmly as the horns of cars rushing to the hospital echo downstairs. Abu Ismail doesn’t flinch—his eyes remain excited and he is always smiling, even though he slept less than two hours the night before.

These are the everyday scenes in one hospital of one neighborhood in Aleppo. A microcosm of what the war looks like for the civilians of Syria, where every day the horror multiplies for even the youngest sufferers in this war. They are often the ones who cry the least as they are treated by doctors, while just a few beds over, grown men, fighters of the Free Syrian Army, scream out in pain. Daily shelling and attacks by helicopters and fighter jets seem to not break the civilian spirit. They remain resilient—they remain because they have no other place to go. Or simply, because they would rather die at home.

Nicole Tung is a freelance photographer who previously documented the uprisings in Libya and Egypt. Tung has previously filed dispatches from Syria recounting the aftermath of an airstrike in Aleppo and civilian funerals in Idlib

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In the mountains of northern Syria, the summer fruits ripened in the orchards. Farmers collected their crops, walking between olive groves, tomato patches and lush trees with a plum-like fruit they call ‘mish mish.’ It was a scene of serenity when I arrived over a week ago, surprising given the news that has streamed constantly out of Syria for the past year. Daily life must go on, my friend Mohamed said. “If you don’t work one day, maybe you won’t eat the next,” was his answer to a question on how the revolution and war affected civilians in Syria. Groups of armed Free Syrian Army fighters, many of them defectors from the military, manned check points and greeted civilians with warmth and familiarity. They knew how close the military was and how the government would not hesitate to use force, so they stayed on watch all the time, handling the meager weapons they had. AK-47s, RPGs, one tank and one 23 mm anti-aircraft gun, the latter two acquired in fights with the Syrian Army. This equipment was all they had to cover the string of more than 40 villages in the mountainous region outside of Idlib.

From our mountain top perch last Saturday, I watched the twinkling lights of the villages and towns below. And then the sickening thuds of incoming mortars erased any notion of serenity. Just 20 kilometers away, the Syrian Army was conducting its usual, almost nightly, attacks on the town of Maarat al Noman, a town of about 100,000 situated on the outskirts of Idlib City. I sat with my hosts as the word arrived about casualties. By 11 p.m., the estimated number of deaths hovered between 20 to 30—mostly the result of mortars.

We decided to go, but it would be no easy feat. The army was stationed at 13 checkpoints inside the city, as well as in the surrounding mountains and farmland. Some were as close as 4 km away. The only way to communicate with the inside was through FSA radios. After more than an hour of planning and coordination between FSA commanders, we were on our way, negotiating back roads and the lack of light. On the final stretch to the city was a Syrian Army check point, located on the top of a hill in what looked like a little house. “There, that’s the army, we’re in a dangerous area now,” Mohamed warned, but I wished he hadn’t told me. I could feel the tension in the car as Ibrahim, a shy FSA fighter who was driving, accelerated, and then I heard the crack of gunfire—four bursts. I waited for the sound of bullets hitting metal, and when it didn’t happen, a collective sigh of relief filled the car.

The shelling momentarily ceased. It was now 1 a.m. as we arrived at a mosque where locals had placed six of the dead in white sheets. The main hospital was under the control of the army, and there was no refrigeration or city morgue. The mortars had reduced the contents of the sheets to nothing but piles of civilian, human flesh—unrecognizable except for a single hand and one somewhat intact body.

I looked for a minute, began photographing, and then felt my stomach turn. The bodies were covered in chalk and large blocks of ice and water bottles were placed between the limbs. “They were just coming out of the mosque after evening prayers,” one local man screamed. “And that’s when the mortars killed them.” Even in the darkness of the mosque, streaks of blood could be seen, almost as if a giant red paint brush had been run across the floor.

In a house nearby, the women of a family were gathered in their living room reading passages from the Quran. They wept as they read, children sitting near them, bewildered. The body of Alaa Milhem, a 22-year-old French Literature student at the University of Aleppo, lay in the middle of the room, his white undershirt soaked with blood, light hair curled across his forehead. His mother bent over him, crying, sobbing, and at times wailing. “Why, why? Why?” She spoke tenderly in hushed tones to her dead son. The women around her began to cry harder, covering their faces with the Quran. Overcome with emotion, they struggled to read it any further.

All I could do was pause for a few minutes and watch. I felt my jaw clench—I could feel the pain in the room. There were no answers for his mother. Her son was studying for his final exams, heard the shelling, ran outside to help the injured, and was hit by another incoming round.

Nicole Tung is a freelance photographer who previously documented the uprisings in Libya and Egypt. See more of her work here.

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Features and Essays

Occupy Wall Street… Terrific photos by Ashley Gilbertson…

Ashley Gilbertson: #Occupy Wall Street (VII) Gilbertson’s earlier Wall Street series: Down on Wall Street and After the Fall

Spencer Heyfron: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Newsweek) Heyfron’s website

Nina Berman: Beyond the Fringe of Protest (NYT Lens)

From Chicago…

Jon Lowenstein: Occupy Chicago (NOOR)

Guillermo Cervera: Trading War for Waves (NYT Lens) Cervera’s archive

Brent Stirton: Virus Hunter (TIME Lightbox)

Libya…

Jehad Nga: Return to Libya (TIME Lightbox)

Michael Christopher Brown: Libya After Gaddafi (Newsweek)

Bryan Denton: Pictures from a Rebellion (Corbis blog) Libya

Afghanistan..

Ben Lowy: Life During Wartime (NYT Mag) | 6th Floor blog: Hipstamatic in Kabul

Larry Towell: Afghanistan 2011. Part II (Magnum)

Last Friday, President Barack Obama announced complete withdrawal of US forces from Iraq by the end of 2011…

In August, the New York Times took a look back at the war in Iraq on the frontlines and at home in the US…I don’t think I ever shared the slideshow…Various photographers’ work included…Below frame from Todd Heisler’s iconic Final Salute…(Remember seeing it first time as it was exhibited in Berlin as part of the touring World Press Photo 2006 exhibition, and being really amazed by it. Actually another Iraq series from the same exhibition, by Peter van Agtmael,  is etched in my memory as well. I saw the WPP 2006 show literally two weeks before I began studying photojournalism, so it had special impact.)

photo: Todd Heisler

New York Times (various photographers): Iraq: Drawing Down and Moving Ahead (NYT)

Mauricio Lima: The Circus Comes to Baghdad (NYT)

Ayman Oghanna: Iraqis (Photo Booth)

Last week I posted a link to Stephanie Sinclair’s Hillary’s Angels on VII…This week we have Diana Walker’s photos of Hillary herself on Lightbox. The series is also TIME cover story on all markets…Lightbox slideshow opens with a frame that is printed double spread in the magazine…

Diana Walker: Hillary Clinton (LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Road Trip (VII)

Lynsey Addario: Somali-Kenyan Famine (VII)

Moises Saman: Awaiting Tunisia’s Vote (NYT)

Tomas van Houtryve: Open Secret (VII Magazine)

Nancy Borowick: Mother’s Cancer (TIME Lightbox)

Alberto Maserin: Portraits of Priests (TIME Lightbox)

Timothy Fadek: Chongqing, China (Polka) “The biggest city you’ve never heard of.”

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The BRIT School (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter (Panos)

Jack Delano: Puerto Rico (NYT Lens)

Larry Fink: Vanity Fair’s Oscar parties (Photo Booth)

Lara Platman: Harris Tweed (BBC)

Toby Smith: Energy in China (NYT Lens)

Edward Burtynsky: View From Above  (Lightbox)

David Degner: Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution (FT Magazine)

Mustafah Abdulaziz & Justin Maxon: Providence (Vimeo)

Mikolaj Nowacki: Parting (VII Mentor)

Will Hartley: In Between Dreams (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks


Martine Franck (WSJ)

Check out DevelopPhoto’s Vimeo…

Develop Photo Vimeo Channel for Photography related videos  (DevelopPhoto Vimeo) Includes recent videos of photographers such as Ed Kashi, Donald Weber, and Peter van Agtmael speaking about the future of photography. Those originally from PhotoQ’s series Facing the Future here.

Dominic Nahr (The Fader)

Lars Tunbjork (New Yorker Photo Booth)

Ron Haviv (Takepart.com)

Juergen Teller (BJP) Teller on  his controversial shoot with Kristen McMenamy for 032c magazine.

Ziyah Gafic (PDN)

Matt Eich (Conscientious Extended)

Rankin (IdeasTap)

Shannon Jensen (10Answers) Jensen is one of the recent additions to Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent. Her portfolio here.

Articles

photo: Nicole Tung

Mike Kamber: On Young Photographers and Conflict’ in Libya (NYT Lens) On photographing conflict for the first time

Russia Beyond the Headlines: Yuri Kozyrev: Walking the revolution road 

photo: Franco Pagetti

Telegraph: Baptism of fire: the story of the VII photo agency (Telegraph) When seven photojournalists decided to join forces, it was just days before 9/11 happened. Their role has been in sharp focus ever since

Gizmodo: How to Be a Citizen Journalist Without Getting Killed

Flavorwire:  A Look at Patti Smith’s First Major Photography Exhibition, ‘Camera Solo’

Toronto Star Photo Blog: Rick Madonik tells about his Libyan fixer

Capital New York: For Tim Hetherington’s close friend and ‘Restrepo’ subjects, mounting a South Bronx gallery show of the late photographer’s work becomes a tribute

PDN: What do you charge for editorial retouching, and how? (PDN)

Telegraph: Photography at the V&A

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Adnan Abidi 

New Yorker Photo Booth:  Great Mistakes, Vanessa Winship’s favorite accidental photo

IJNet: Five Google tools journalists don’t use but should

Source: Top Ten Tips on getting the most of your photography degree

Penumbra Project: Surviving as a photographer in the new economy

photo: Eli Reed

Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 3 (IdeasTap)

Joerg Colberg: What Happened to the Mid-Career Artist (Conscientious)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.23: Gaddafi’s death

David Campbell: Agencies as publishers: a new approach to photojournalism (DC blog)

Marco Bohr: Google Street View and the Politics of Exploitation (Visual Culture Blog)

Verve: Valerio Bispuri (Verve)

Also in new breed of documentary photographers.. Chien Chi-Chang (Verve)… ahem…

Guardian: Occupy London empty tent claims based on ‘rubbish science’  (Guardian) Scientist specialising in camouflage said photographers with thermal imaging equipment were not using right camera settings

Adam Westbrook: 10 common video storytelling mistakes (and how to avoid them) (AW blog)

Adam McCauley: Covering 9/11 with Ashley Gilbertson (Storify)

BJP: The Third Floor Gallery is Cardiff is looking for £12,000 to expand

BJP: Spotlight on crowdfunding: Photographer Neil Osborne is raising funds to document how one man saved the Black Turtle

BJP: The London Street Photography Festival + Grant Smith to present “Stand Your Ground” at BJP’s Vision

BJP: The Open Eye Gallery is reopening in new premises. BJP asks the director and curator what we can expect to see

Petapixel: Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Videos

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #3

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #2

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #1

Page One : Inside The New York Times : trailer

Vicki Bennett: Deconstructing the way we perceive space in cinema (Contact Editions)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Andrea Morales Wins TIME’s Next Generation Photography Contest | Morales’ website

FotoVisura Grant. The deadline is December 5, 2011.

PhotoPhilantrophy Grant Rounds Schedule

Blogs

NPPA Visual Student

Crowd funding

Go and support my friend Amanda’s project…She’s already past the halfway mark…

Amanda Rivkin : BTC Oil Pipeline (Emphas.is)

Events and Exhibitions


Giles Duley : Becoming the Story : Artist Talk: Wednesday 2 November 6-9pm (talk starts at 7pm) Private View: Thursday 3 November  7 – 9pm Exhibition Runs: 4 – 26 November : KK Outlet : London

Hell and Back Again by Danfung Dennis : Screening : November 7 :  Foto8 :  London

Amazon : exhibition in aid of Sky Rainforest Rescue : Somerset House, London :  photography from Sebastião Salgado and Per Anders Pettersson

Magnum Photos symposium to discuss the role of contact sheets in photograph :  26 November : London

The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar

Jobs

MediaStorm’s Spring Internship : Deadline November 1

B&H is hiring a full-time Photo Related Blogger

NPR : assistant producer for multimedia

Reuters freelance TV news producer

Agencies and Collectives

Statement Images is looking for new members

Zeppelin

Photographers

Suzanne Lee

Jussi Puikkonen

Tania Lee Crow

As a final note… Busiest day so far on the blog last Friday with 2,870 views and looks like October is on its way of becoming to be the month with most traffic ever…around 37,000 views…Thanks for visiting.

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So we finally got the good news on Monday that Addario, Hicks, Farrell, and Shadid had been released. You can read the account of their detention on the New York Times website…

Articles - NYT: 4 Times Journalists Held Captive in Libya Faced Days of Brutality (NYT: March 2011) an earlier article Freed Times Journalists Give Account of Captivity

Articles - CPJ: Times reporters freed in Libya; 13 still missing, detained (CPJ: March 2011)

NB. Joe Raedle of Getty and David Clark and Roberto Schmidt of AFP, mentioned in the CPJ article above have been reported free this morning and leaving Libya.

Articles – BJP: Reuters’ photographer Goran Tomasevic scores front page success (BJP: March 2011)

Alex Majoli’s Libya work in black and white now on Magnum site… There are several photos in there that were previously shown in colour on Newsweek’s site..I think I prefer the black and white ones….

Features and Essays - Alex Majoli: Libya Uprising (Magnum: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Franco Pagetti: Libya, Dreaming of a Revolution (VII: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Luis Sinco: Libya (LA Times: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Andy Rocchelli, Gabriele Micalizzi: Libya Civil War (Cesuralab: March 2011)

Ben Lowy has been posting some  iPhone Hipstas from Libya on his Tumblr…

TumblrBen Lowy

Christopher Morris’ updated Libya gallery on Lightbox here.

Features and Essays - Marco Salustro: Volunteer Human Shields in Tripoli (Corbis: March 2011)

InterviewsPatrick Baz Is in His Element in Libya (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Backstory on the release of the Guardian’s Ghaith Abdul Ahad from Libya last week (via @foodforyoureyes)…

Articles – Press Gazzette: Guardian editor gives credit to Turkey and Libya as he reveals inside story of Ghaith Abdul-Ahad’s release (Press Gazzette: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Baptiste Giroudon: Egypt:Life after the Revolution (Photographer’s website: March 2011)

Articles – BagNewsNotes: Alan Chin on the Middle East: Ghosts of Suez and Srebrenica (BNN: March 2011)

Articles - BagNewsNotes: Nicole Tung in Eastern Libya: Fresh To My Virgin Eyes (BNN: March 2011) (NB: post includes one extremely graphic image)

Articles - Jorg Colberg: A War of Images (Conscientious: March 2011)

Over 1,600 clicks on the ‘photo within a photo’ from Libya seen below, that I put on Twitpic the other day… So here it is again.. On the left you can see Paul Conroy’s photo, and if you look closely, you can see a pair of legs behind Tyler Hicks (first photographer from the right). I’m fairly certain, those legs belong to Yuri Kozyrev, who is taking the photo on the right pretty much at the same exact moment… Fairly random observation, I know, but still kinda interesting I thought…

To Japan..

From Newsweek…

Features and Essays - Q. Sakamaki: Aftermath (Newsweek: March 2011) Japan

Features and Essays - Peter Blakely: Japan: Relief Efforts Amid the Devastation (Newsweek: March 2011) Blakely’s website

MSNBC has a section titled Outside The Frame on their Photoblog, where AP photojournalist David Guttenfelder shares his experience covering the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan…A bit like the Backstory in Lightbox

Features and Essays - MSNBC: Outside the Frame (MSNBC: March 2011)

They also have panoramics from Japan on the Photoblog here, as well as some  ‘Japan before and after the earthquake, tsunami’ sliders

Some panoramic composites also on Lightbox, slightly differently executed though, and surprisingly by nobody other than James Nachtwey… 

Dispatch from Japan: James Nachtwey’s Impressions in Words and Pictures

Domic Nahr’s updated Japan gallery on Lightbox here.

Great BJP article on photographers working in Japan at the moment…

Articles – BJP: Japan Earthquake: Photographing the aftermath (BJP: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Donald Weber: Capital of the Third Millennium (VII Network: March 2011) Brasilia, Brazil

Looking forward to seeing this movie, although I am a bit sceptical as to whether it’ll be any good…

MoviesBang Bang Club trailer (Apple)

Articles - BJP: Movie to recount Bang Bang Club’s story (BJP: March 2011)

2011 FotoEvidence Book Award Winner…

Interviews - Paula Bronstein (Fotoevidence: March 2011)

Interviews - Terry O’Neill (Telegraph: March 2011)

Awards - The shortlist for the first World Press Photo multimedia contest has been announced (WPP: March 2011) From BJP

Articles / Tutorials and Tips - Mike Davis: Some Things To Consider When Entering Contests (Mike Davis blog: March 2011)

Videos Joel Meyerowitz 1981 Film

Articles -PDN: Appropriation Artist Richard Prince Liable for Infringement, Court Rules (PDN: March 2011) Also:  A Photo Editor: Richard Prince Loses Fair Use Argument (APE: March 2011)

Articles - Phaidon: Martin Parr takes cover for Esquire’s 20th anniversary (Phaidon: March 2011)

Agencies - David Chancellor joins Institute

Exhibitions - Tate Modern: Burke + Norfolk: Photographs From The War In Afghanistan : 6 May  –  10 July 2011 : Free entry!

Events Contact VS ASA Collective Slideshow evening (NB: Facebook link), 1st April : London

Exhibitions Laura Hynd, Michael Grieve, JH Engstrom and Tereza Zelenkova are on show at the Oblong Gallery until 23 March (BJP: March 2011)

I went to University College of Falmouth second year BA Press and Editorial Photography students’ exhibition, Progression, at Calument London…It’s a show of 34 photographs, one by each of the students on the course.

The exhibition is up for a month. Go and have a look if you happen to wonder around the Euston area in London, or have business in the aforementioned establishment. Big thanks to Dan Cainey for having invited me to the opening. Several promising works on display, so it was a pleasure.

BlogsHere by Harry Hardie

PhotographersYunghi Kim

Photographers - Shamil Tanna

PhotographersTal Cohen

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Paolo Pellegrin in Libya for the New York Times Magazine…

Features and Essays - Paolo Pellegrin: Scenes from the Libyan Exodus (NYT Magazine: March 2011)

Sunday Herald (Scotland) picture editor Ross Gilmore kindly sent a link to a Libya slideshow he had put on the newspaper’s website… Several brilliant photos by John Moore (see below), Marco Longari, et al….

Features and Essays - Sunday Herald: Libya (various photographer: Libya (Sunday Herald: March 2011)

Articles - Guardian Eyewitness: Emilio Morenatti: Migrant workers on the Tunisia-Libya border (Guardian: March 2011)

Guardian: Protests in Benghazi, eastern Libya (Guardian: March 2011) Protesters mass together under the pre-Gaddafi Libyan flag in the court square after Friday prayers in Benghazi, which has become the capital of the rebel movement

Dictator chic… Vanity Fair: Colonel Qaddafi—A Life in Fashion (VF: 2009)

Michael Christopher Brown doing Hipstas in Libya…

Features and Essays – Michael Christopher Brown: Libya (Photographer’s website: March 2011)

Don’t remember having seen Kosuke Okahara’s work in colour before…

Features and Essays - Kosuke Okahara:  Refugees at Libya’s borders with Tunisia (Russian Reporter: March 2011)

Kozyrev….

Updated TIME gallery with Yuri Kozyrev’s Libya work

NYT have continued to update their’s also… The below Lynsey Addario photo from 8 March really stuck in my mind…

Updated New York Times Libya gallery, up to 248 photos when I’m writing this

Nicole Tung in Libya, covering her first war, on BagNewsNotes…

Features and Essays – Nicole Tung: Eastern Libya (BNN: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Gabriele Stabile, Andy Rocchelli: Tunisian-Libyan Border (Cesuralab: March 2011)

InterviewsTyler Hicks In the Thick of Libya’s Brutal Fighting (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Zed Nelson had the Guardian Weekend cover today with 24 photos over 10 pages inside….

Features and Essays - Zed Nelson: Disappearing Tribes (Guardian: March 2011) Zed Nelson’s photographs capture the human face behind disappearing Britain – the war veterans, the miners, the boxers and the fishermen. Blake Morrison reflects on the price of progress

Features and Essays - Patrick Zachmann: Chinese Journal (Magnum: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Anastasia Taylor-Lind: The Return of the Female Cossacks (Marie Claire: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Sean Smith: Gang violence in Caracas (Guardian: March 2011) Gang warfare killed 14,000 people last year alone in Caracas. Sean Smith documents the violence that plagues the slums of Venezuela’s capital. Warning: Contains distressing images

Features and Essays - Ivan Kashinsky and Karla Gachet: Tunupa’s Tears (Panos: March 2011) Bolivia

Features and Essays - Michael Webster: Brooklyn Carnival (Burn: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Finbarr O’Reilly: Looking Through Afghanistan’s Closed Doors (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Chris Gregory: The Well: Covering Capitol Hill (Chris Gregory Vimeo: March 2011) Gregory’s website

Features and Essays -  Majid Saeedi: Deadly legacy: Afghan landmine victims in portraits (TIME: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Emily Bunt: Beloved (Foto8: March 2011) Bunt’s website

Features and Essays - Alex Masi: Buddhas of Bamiyan (BBC: March 2011)

InterviewsElizabeth Biondi (lalettredelaphotographie.com: March 2011)

Interviews - Alec Soth (Photocrew.com: March 2011)

InterviewsAlex Prager in conversation with Yancey Richardson (Aperture Foundation Vimeo: 2011)

Interviews and TalksJoel Meyerowitz (BJP: March 2011)

InterviewsMartin Brink (Ubranautica: 2011)

EventsChris Steele-Perkins Photovoice talk in London on Monday 14th March.

Grants MF Announces Funds for New Independent Documentary Photography Projects (Magnum Emergency Foundation Emergency Fund)

Articles – Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Andy Wong (Guardian: March 2011) Beijing-based Associated Press photographer Andy Wong captures daily life in the Chinese capital

Articles – Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Rodrigo Abd (Guardian: March 2011) The Guatemala-based, award-winning Associated Press photographer joins the world’s biggest party as Rio de Janeiro celebrates carnival

Articles – PDN: Tax Rule Changes and Tips That Will Save You Money on Your 2010 Returns (PDN: March 2011)

Videos - Pieter Hugo:  Spoek Mathambo music video (Dazed and Confused: March 2011)

Articles / Tutorials and Tips – Lightstalkers: Insurance for freelancers working in conflict zones (LS: 2011)

Photographers - Andrew Moore

Photographers - Tom Jamieson

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We’re still in Libya…

Features and Essays - Alex Majoli: Libyans Flood Tunisia’s Border Zone (Newsweek: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Christopher Morris: Muammar Gaddafi’s Tripoli (TIME: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Moises Saman: Libyan Crisis (Magnum: March 2011)

NYT’s Libya gallery updated with photos from yesterday

Earlier today, I was reading March 14 issue of TIME with a lot of Yuri Kozyrev’s photos from Libya and Yemen…

See Kozyrev’s updated Libya gallery on Time’s website here.

His Yemen work..It was interesting to compare the photos online and in print…Something I noticed regarding these Yemen ones, was that the frames in print didn’t look half as punchy as online…Love the toning…

Features and Essays – Yuri Kozyrev: On the Ground in Yemen (TIME: February 2011)

Emphas.is has launched..

Crowdfunding - Emphas.is

Articles – NYT: Financing Photojournalism by Subscription (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen’s ViaPanAm is one of the Emphas.is projects…

Features and Essays - Kadir van Lohuizen:  ViaPanAm (Project website: 2011)

Features and Essays - Graeme Robertson: Guatemalan street children (Guardian: March 2011)

I seem to recall that Boston Globe’s Big Picture has been doing several of these monthly round-ups of Afghanistan in the past… these are from February…

Features and Essays – Boston Globe: Afghanistan February 2011 (Boston Globe Big Picture: March 2011)

Speaking of Afghanistan, I just started reading Sebastian Junger’s War… First 30 pages really sucked me in…

Features and Essays – Steve Davis: Elegy for a Small Idaho Town (NYT Lens: March 2011) Davis’ website

Bruce Haley on NYT Lens and New Yorker Photo Booth…

Features and Essays - Bruce Haley: Rebuilding Lives in Former Soviet Lands (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Features and Essays – Bruce Haley: Postcard from Nagorno-Karabakh and beyond (New Yorker: March 2011)

Haley’s website

Features and Essays - Mark Ovaska: The Search For Glacier Gold (NPR: March 2011)

Talent calls…

AgenciesMagnum Photos issues annual submission call (BJP: March 2011)

MagazinesFOAM Magazine Talent Call

Loads of interviews…

Interviews - Bruce Gilden (BJP: March 2011) Exclusive video: Bruce Gilden goes “head on” in Derby

Interviews - Stanley Greene (Youtube)

Interviews - Steve McCurry (Pro Photographers in Ireland Vimeo: 2011)

Interviews - Brent Lewin (Msnbc.com: March 2011)

Interviews - Nina Berman (APE: March 2011)

InterviewsNick Turpin on street photography’s challenges (BJP: March 2011)

Interviews Michael Wolf welcomes World Press Photo controversy (BJP: March 2011)

Interviews - Lu Guang (Greenpeace Vimeo)

Magnum Foundation has a new website…

AgenciesMagnum Foundation

Articles - BBC: Right Here, Right Now: At the Format Festival in Derby (BBC: March 2011)

Back in time…

Articles - NYT: Tom Waits and Robert Frank, New York City, 1985 (NYT Magazine: March 2011)

Articles - Guardian: The big picture: Whitechapel 1972 (Guardian: March 2011)Ian Berry’s photograph, commissioned by the Whitechapel Gallery, captures a key moment of change in an area long used to a shifting population

PhotographersTodd Bigelow

Veronica got herself a new website…

Photographers - Veronica Sanchis Bencomo

Photographers - Nick Ballon

PhotographersAnnemarie Scholz

PhotographersNicole Tung

Copyright issues…

Articles - BJP: Photographers’ Gallery finds itself at centre of copyright row (BJP: March 2011)

Articles – Jeremy Nicholl: Dear Photographers, Lady Gaga Wants The Copyright On Your Work. Oh, And By The Way, So Do We (photographer’s blog: March 2011)

VideosSimon  Roberts uploaded  new 120 Seconds short films from the last couple of weeks (Simon Roberts Vimeo: March 2011)

Articles - Verve: Boris Heger (Verve: March 2011)

Workshops - Very affordable workshop with Joseph Rodriquez in Cardiff 21-24 March, organised by Third Floor Gallery

Exhibitions and BooksThe month in photography (Guardian: March 2011) The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books

Resources - LinkedIn …. I’ve had a LinkedIn profile for about a year, but I never got around to finishing my profile and adding contacts until recently…and I’ve noticed that not only is the site good for virtual networking with colleagues I know, but also with ones I don’t. I’ve managed for instance to find names of loads of  photo editors at different newspapers and magazines through my Linked In contacts, which is pretty useful (There is of course Agency Access but you have to pay for that)…and I guess that’s what the whole linking-in is about…

Speaking of LinkedIn… I noticed that VII Photo’s LinkedIn profile starts, maybe slightly peculiarly, with: “ The third most-important entity in photography”…as one might expect something more on the lines of, say ‘one of the most important entities in photography’…anyway…if VII are the third most important entity (finding the word entity a bit odd too), then I couldn’t help but thinking what are the two most important? Magnum Photos must one of the two for sure. The other? International Center of Photography was suggested on Twitter last night as were Getty…  Not trying to pick on VII here, of course…just food for funny thought.

About Twitter. I noticed I passed the 2,000 tweets mark yesterday. I got my profile on 19 January 2009, which based on my rough calculations means something like 2,6 tweets a day. The first ever tweet of mine? ”Loves Paolo Pellegrin’s DC piece at Magnum in Motion http://tinyurl.com/8n5q64” – @photojournalism

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