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In this post, featuring images from the last quarter of 2011, we remember a tumultuous year of change across the globe, the capture of Khadafi, the 10th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center, the passing of Apple icon Steve Jobs, fire, famine, flood and protests. A memorable year, indeed. -- Paula Nelson -- Please see part 1 and part 2 from earlier. (EDITOR'S NOTE: We will not post a Big Picture on Monday, December 26, due to the Christmas Holiday ) (51 photos total)
A defaced portrait of fugitive Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi in Tripoli on Sept. 1, 2011 as the fallen strongman vowed again not to surrender in a message broadcast on the 42nd anniversary of the coup which brought him to power. (Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

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All it takes are two groups of people, one to gather and one to march past them. Parades took place across the globe these past two months for a variety of celebrations, from shows of military power, to tributes to organized labor, to pride for one’s country or culture. -- Lloyd Young (37 photos total)
Performers dance in the street parade at the annual Notting Hill Carnival in central London Aug. 29.. Revelers flocked to west London for one of Europe's biggest street parties, with record numbers of police on duty to prevent a repetition of riots that shook the British capital three weeks ago. Notting Hill Carnival, an annual celebration of Caribbean culture that usually draws about 1 million people for a colorful procession of musicians and performers. (Olivia Harris/Reuters)

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When dictators are overthrown by rebel or military forces, their many elaborate palaces, mansions and bunkers are evacuated, left behind for the new forces to rummage through.

From Saddam Hussein’s palace, Maqar-el-Tharthar, a massive residence at Lake Tharthar, to Moamer Kadhafi’s homes and his families homes scattered throughout Libya, the first peek into their lavish lifestyles come to life as rebels enter each residence.

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American soldiers patrolled inside a palace which belonged to Uday Hussein in Baghdad, Thursday, April 10, 2003. The palace was heavily bomed by coalition airpower. (Tyler Hicks/The New York Times) #

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Soldiers and civilians occupy the office of ousted Romanian Leader Ceaucescu in the Central Committee headquarters 26 December 1989 in Bucharest. Nicolae Ceaucescu and his wife Elena has been executed 25 December 1989. (Photo credit should read PATRICK HERTZOG/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Anti-Communist soldier (L) sticks a bayonet through a portrait of late Romanian Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu 28 December 1989 in Sibiu as the anti-Communist uprising to end Nicolae Ceausescu's 24 years of dictatorial rule continue. The communist dictator N. Ceausescu and his wife Elena were deposed and executed by a firing squad 25 December 1989. Eight years after the December 1989 revolution which toppled Ceausescu, Romania has begun lifting the veil on the "mysteries" surrounding the uprising and the circumstances which brought former president Ion Iliescu to power. According to general prosecutor Sorin Moisescu, reports put about at the time of "terrorists loyal to Ceausescu" provoking bloody diversions to sow panic in the population, were "fabricated" to justify Iliescu's takeover. "Nothing that happened after 22 December 1989 was due to chance. The deaths of some of the demonstrators were supposed to provide legitimacy to the new regime" Moisecu said 24 December 1998. (Photo credit should read MICHEL GANGNE/AFP/Getty Images) #

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An inside view of the Saddam Hussein's palace, Maqar-el-Tharthar is seen on June 11, 2003 at Lake Tharthar, Iraq. Saddam celebrated his birthday in 1999 by building Maqar-el-Tharthar, the so-called "Green Palace" which is the biggest and most elaborate of President Saddam's palaces. It covers two and a half square miles and consists of a Presidential and VIP residential compounds; it is the second only to the President's Tikrit residence in overall size. The complex was not bombed by Coalition forces but has been completely looted afterwards by Iraqis. (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images) #

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An Iraqi woman and her daughter cross a smoke filled intersection with looted tables April 11, 2003 in downtown Baghdad, Iraq. Widespread looting of both government buildings and private businesses is rampant across Baghdad following the collapse of local authority after coalition forces took the city. (Photo by Scott Nelson/Getty Images) #

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A US soldier sits in a seat at the Radwaniyah Palace used during the toppled regime of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein as a reception palace for guests near Baghdad's international airport 25 June 2003. The international press was taken on a tour of the palaces by the US military, three months after the fall of Baghdad. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images #

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A journalist films inside one of the main reception rooms of toppled leader Saddam Hussein's 'Peace Palace' or 'Qasr al-Salam' in Baghdad 25 June 2003. The international press was taken on a tour of the palaces by the US military, three months after the fall of Baghdad. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images #

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A US soldier sits on the stairs at the entrance of toppled Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's damaged 'Peace Palace' or 'Qasr al-Salam' in Baghdad 25 June 2003. The international press was taken on a tour of the palaces by the US military, three months after the fall of Baghdad. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images #

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U.S. Army Specialist Ureses Zamora, from Las Vegas, Nevada, of the 4th Infantry Division, usues a laptop in a former palace of Saddam Hussein November 12, 2003 in a former Saddam Hussein palace in Tikrit, Iraq. The soldiers are living in relative comfort as they continue to pursue the enemy in Saddam Hussein's hometown. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) #

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CAMP VICTORY, IRAQ - JULY 1: Soldiers stand at attention during a change of command ceremony July 1, 2004 in Camp Victory, Iraq. Gen. Casey took command of the forces from Gen. Sanchez in a change of command ceremony at the elaborate Al-Faw Palace in Camp Victory. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images) #

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** FILE ** U.S. Army soldiers Spc. Daniel Andrews of Lynchburg, Va., left, and Pvt. Robert Knott of Fort Hood, Tex., both from Alfa Company-588 swim in an indoor pool at one of ousted Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's palaces, now a U.S. Army base, in Tikrit, Iraq, Monday Sept. 1, 2003. U.S. soldiers stationed here in this riverside palace complex that once belonged to Saddam Hussein face constant danger from Iraqi insurgents whenever they leave the base. But once inside, they are getting to kick back inincreasing style. (AP Photo/Murad Sezer) #

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A US Army soldier from the 1-22 Battalion of the 4th Infantry Division (Task Force Ironhorse) shoots the ball during a basketball game inside one of ousted Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's former palaces along the banks of the Tigris river in Tikrit, 180km (110 miles) north of Baghdad, 23 November 2003. With their marble interiors, domed roofs and intricate arabesque stucco, the headquarters of the 4th ID look more like a vision from a Middle Eastern fairy tale than a military camp. The resort-like series of palaces now called Forward Base Ironhorse used to be a favorite resting place of Saddam before US-led coalition forces ousted him in April. AFP PHOTO/Mauricio LIMA (Photo credit should read MAURICIO LIMA/AFP/Getty Images) #

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TACLOBAN, PHILIPPINES: Visitors view the bedroom of Imelda Marcos at the Santo Nino shrine 13 October 2004 that was sequestered by the government. When the former first lady built the mansion in 1981 in her hometown Tacloban, it was dubbed by many as the Malacanang presidential palace of the south. The mansion named after religious icon of the Child Jesus stands as a monument to the obscene excesses of the Marcos years whenthe late dictator Ferdinand Marcos was deposed by military-backed people power revolt in 1986 after 20 years in power. AFP PHOTO ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images) #

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TACLOBAN, PHILIPPINES: The bathroom with jacuzzi of the former first lady Imelda Marcos at the Santo Nino shrine 13 October 2004 that was sequestered by the government. When Imelda built the mansion in 1981 in her hometown Tacloban, it was dubbed by many as the Malacanang presidential palace of the south. The mansion named after religious icon of the Child Jesus stands as a monument to the obscene excesses of the Marcos years when the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos was deposed in 1986 by a military-backed people power revolt after 20 years in power. AFP PHOTO ROMEO GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images) #

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BAGHDAD, Iraq: Iraqi soldiers gestures to a giant mural of ousted Iraqi Dictator Saddam Hussein still hanging in of his former palaces in Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone in this image taken 19 October 2005. Once a Pan Arab champion, Saddam the feared Iraqi leader will go on trial 28 November 2005 on charges linked to the killing of 148 Shiite villagers. AFP PHOTO/KARIM SAHIB (Photo credit should read KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images) #

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HILLAH, IRAQ, APRIL 21: A worker makes a bed inside a marbled room where Saddam supposedly once slept, at one of the former dictator 's palace villas, which can be rented for about USD170 a night on April 21, 2009 in the city of Hillah in Babil province about 50 miles south of Baghdad, Iraq. The Palace, which is adjacent to the remains of the ancient city of Babylon, was purged of anything of value by looters as Saddam's regime fell in April 2003 and then occupied by US and coalition forces until late 2006. The palace was opened to public who can visit it for about 85 US cents. Some of its surrounded villas have been converted into hotel rooms. (Photo by Muhannad Fala'ah/Getty Images) #

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A looter carries away a chair inside Saddam Hussein's main palace in Baghdad 12 April, 2003. Looting has plagued Baghdad and other Iraqi cities since US forces won control of the capital 09 April. Hundreds of Iraqis, including police officers, answered 12 April an urgent US appeal to help restore order and services to Baghdad after an orgy of looting followed weeks of heavy coalition bombardment. AFP PHOTO ODD ANDERSEN (Photo credit should read ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images) #

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US Army Sergeant Craig Zentkovich from Connecticut belonging to the 1st Brigade Combat Team photographs a pink bedroom at Saddam Hussein's presidential palace 13 April 2003. The palace is located in a vast military compound near the airport southwest of the capital. AFP PHOTO/Romeo GACAD (Photo credit should read ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images) #

 The Palaces Left Behind

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A US marine walks inside the presidential palace in Port-Au-Prince 09 March 2004. Troops from France, the US and Chile have poured into the country in an effort to stabilize the country after former Haitian president Jean Bertrand Aristide fled the country 29 February 2004. AFP PHOTO/Jaime RAZURI (Photo credit should read JAIME RAZURI/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A soldier of the rebel Alliance of Laurent-Desire Kabila, surrounded by looters, uses his weapon to hit a photograph of ousted Zairean President Mobutu Sese Seko 20 May 1997 in the house the former leader kept at the Tshatshi military camp in Kinshasa. In October 1996, Zairean opposition leader Laurent Desire Kabila, as head of the newly formed Alliance of Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Congo-Zaire, rallied forces consisting mostly of Tutsi from eastern Zaire and launched a full-scale rebellion against Mobutu, forcing him to flee the country, following failed peace talks in May 1997. On 17 May 1997, Kabila installed himself as head of state after his troops took control of Kinshasa and renamed the country the Democratic Republic of Congo. (Photo credit should read PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Afghan youth play football in front of the ruins of the Darul Aman Palace in Kabul on December 3, 2010. Afghan government officials hit back at "stupid" allegations made in leaked US diplomatic cables about corruption but refused to comment on a damning assessment of President Hamid Karzai. Deputy presidential spokesman Hamed Elmi downplayed documents released by Internet whistleblower WikiLeaks as "not much new," with "nothing substantive to negatively affect our good relations with the international community". AFP PHOTO/Massoud HOSSAINI (Photo credit should read MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A child stands in a room of the former palace of late dictator Mobutu Sese Seko, in Gbadolite, on November 24, 2010. Mobutu built two private residences and an official presidential palace among other buildings in Gbadolite and Kawele. Mobutu came to power in a 1965 coup, five years after the central African nation gained independence from Belgium. He ruled Zaire for 32 years, plunging the country into a long economic crisis marked by state corruption, the embezzlement of funds and excessive luxuries. AFP PHOTO / GWENN DUBOURTHOUMIEU (Photo credit should read Gwenn Dubourthoumieu/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Tunisian workers remove on January 17, 2011 portraits of ousted President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali from the prime minister's office in Tunis. Tunisian protesters on January 17 called for the abolition of Ben Ali's ruling party amid a chaotic power vacuum as politicians prepared a government of national unity. The Moroccan press welcomed on January 17 the fall of Ben Ali after weeks of street protests, and said it was a lesson for north Africa and the Arab world. AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAID (Photo credit should read FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A Libyan rebel stands inside the front door of a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by rebels as they get increased access to areas after the ouster of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A general shot shows the gardens of a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by Libyan rebels as they get increased access to areas after ousted Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces were forced to abandon their residences. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A general view shows a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by rebels as they get increased access to areas after the ouster of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A Libyan rebel walks past a swimming pool outside the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Libyan rebels inspect the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Libyan rebels inspect an empty swimming pool at the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A Libyan rebel poses for a souvenir picture outside the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Former Abu Slim prisoner, Sami Sadiq Abu Ruwais, stands next to a swimming pool inside a luxurious complex that rebels and local residents claim to be the holiday home of the Kadhafi family in Ain Zara close to Tripoli, on August 31, 2011. Numerous luxury buildings have been discovered by rebels as they get increased access to areas after the ouster of Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi and his loyalist forces. AFP PHOTO/CARL DE SOUZA (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images) #

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A Libyan rebel inspects an underground network of bunkers under the mansion of Motassem Kadhafi, a son of Libya's embattled leader, in Tripoli on August 30, 2011. Libya's rebels issued an ultimatum for Moamer Kadhafi's forces to surrender or face a military onslaught, as NATO said the strongman is still able to command his troops despite being on the run. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

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Algeria said this week that it had allowed a two-vehicle caravan of Col. Muammar Khadafi's relatives, including his second wife and three of his children, into the country. The flight of his relatives provides new evidence of surrender by the Khadafi clan as rebels tighten their hold on Tripoli, the capital. Khadafi's wife, Safiya, daughter Aisha and two of his sons, Mohammed and Hannibal, all crossed into Algeria. The spouses of Khadafi's children and their children arrived as well. This post gives us a glimpse of how those family members lived while in power in Libya. The value of these images isn't in their artistry or aesthetic, but in their storytelling information as we seek to uncover more behind the scenes of the Khadafi regime that spanned forty-two years. --Paula Nelson (NOTE: Monday is a holiday. See you again on Wednesday.)(31 photos total)
As rebels, looters, and simply the curious rifled through what's left of the estates of Moammar Khadafy and his sons, most were struck by the rather mundane furnishings and peculiar habits they accumulated. In Hannibal Khadafy's home, a torn image of the son was discovered. (Zohra Bensemra/Reuters)

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ALL ABOARD! Commuters crammed onto a train to travel to their home villages from Dhaka, Bangladesh, Tuesday. Millions of Muslims are going to celebrate the Eid festival, which marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. (Abir Abdullah/European Pressphoto Agency)

UP AND OVER
UP AND OVER: Greece’s Nikoleta Kiriakopoulou competed in the women’s pole vault final at the IAAF World Championships in Daegu, South Korea, Tuesday. (Phil Noble/Reuters)

CHILD’S PLAY
CHILD’S PLAY: Children played with toy weapons in Mogadishu, Somalia, Tuesday. (Abdurashid Abikar/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

LAID-BACK
LAID-BACK: Rebels inspected the mansion of Moatassem Gadhafi, son of embattled leader Col. Moammar Gadhafi, in Tripoli, Libya, Tuesday. Rebel leaders are negotiating with regime loyalists over the fate of Col. Gadhafi’s hometown of Sirte. (Patrick Baz/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

IN TALKS
IN TALKS: Socialist Party presidential candidate Alfredo Pérez Rubalcaba, left, spoke with a politician during a session of Spanish Parliament in Madrid Tuesday. Lawmakers voted to open deliberations on a proposal that would shore up constitutional budgetary controls. (Daniel Ochoa de Olza/Associated Press)

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The rebels claim they have now taken control of nearly all of Tripoli, but Gadhafi loyalists fired shells and assault rifles at fighters who had captured the Libyan leader’s personal Bab al-Azizya compound one day earlier.

A rebel fighter climbs on top of a statue inside Moammar Gadhafi’s compound Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli. Intense clashes erupted between Libyan rebels and regime loyalists in a neighborhood next to Moammar Gadhafi’s compound that was stormed by opposition forces a day earlier.

Rebel fighters posed for photos on a two seater couch framed by a golden mermaid with the face of Aisha Gadhafi the daughter of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi in her house in Tripoli. A defiant Moammar Gadhafi vowed to fight on “until victory or martyrdom,” as rebel fighters tried to end scattered attacks by regime loyalists in the nervous capital.

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Salem Hasam Ali, 62, a shop owner, cries and flashes v-sign after singing the pre-Moammar Gadhafi Libyan national anthem at the rebel-held town of Benghazi, Libya, late Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. Hundreds of Libyan rebels stormed Gadhafi's compound Tuesday, charging wildly through the symbolic heart of the crumbling regime as they killed loyalist troops, looted armories and knocked the head off a statue of the besieged dictator. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters look towards the enemy as they hear the sound of bombardments in the village of Mayah, some 30 kilometers west from Tripoli, LIbya, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2011. Libyan rebels said they were less than 20 miles (30 kilometers) from Moammar Gadhafi's main stronghold of Tripoli on Sunday, a day after opposition fighters launched their first attack on the capital itself. Fighters said a 600-strong rebel force that set out from Zawiya has reached the outskirts of the village of Jedaim and was coming under heavy fire from regime forces on the eastern side of the town. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Medics treat a pro-Gadhafi fighter in the Abu-Rafat hospital on the outskirts of Zawiya, LIbya, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2011. Libyan rebels said they were less than 20 miles (30 kilometers) from Moammar Gadhafi's main stronghold of Tripoli on Sunday, a day after opposition fighters launched their first attack on the capital itself. Fighters said a 600-strong rebel force that set out from Zawiya has reached the outskirts of the village of Jedaim and was coming under heavy fire from regime forces on the eastern side of the town. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel stands atop a ZSU-23 mobile anti-aircraft vehicle that was captured at an ammunition supply warehouse at a military base that was home to the Khamis Brigade, in al-Maya, Libya, Aug. 21, 2011. Rebels surged into the Libyan capital Sunday night, meeting only sporadic resistance from troops loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi and setting off raucous street celebrations by residents hailing the end of his 42 years in power. (Bryan Denton/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyans embrace as people gather to celebrate the entrance of the rebels into Tripoli, in Benghazi, on Aug. 21, 2011. Rebels surged into the Libyan capital Sunday night, meeting only sporadic resistance from troops loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi and setting off raucous street celebrations by residents hailing the end of his 42 years in power. (Nicole Tung/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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People celebrate the capture in Tripoli of Moammar Gadhafi's son and one-time heir apparent, Seif al-Islam, at the rebel-held town of Benghazi, Libya, early Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. Libyan rebels raced into Tripoli in a lightning advance Sunday that met little resistance as Moammar Gadhafi's defenders melted away and his 40-year rule appeared to rapidly crumble. The euphoric fighters celebrated with residents of the capital in the city's main square, the symbolic heart of the regime. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyans gather to celebrate the entrance of the rebels into Tripoli, in Benghazi, Libya, on Aug. 21, 2011. Rebels surged into the Libyan capital Sunday night, meeting only sporadic resistance from troops loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi and setting off raucous street celebrations by residents hailing the end of his 42 years in power. (Nicole Tung/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Men walk on a street carrying a pre-Gadhafi's flag during the celebrations of the capture in Tripoli of his son and one-time heir apparent, Seif al-Islam, at the rebel-held town of Benghazi, Libya, early Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. Libyan rebels raced into Tripoli in a lightning advance Sunday that met little resistance as Moammar Gadhafi's defenders melted away and his 40-year rule appeared to rapidly crumble. The euphoric fighters celebrated with residents of the capital in the city's main square, the symbolic heart of the regime. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A libyan rebels security forces member looks on as libyan youth play with a canister at Freedom square on August 22, 2011 in Benghazi, Libya. Tripoli residents spent Monday jubilant yet fearful, asking for weapons to join rebels in their cat-and-mouse war with loyalists who have besieged the city with snipers and drive-by shootings. The capital's battle-scarred streets were all but empty, the day after rebels made a lightning advance on the capital to drive out defiant leader Moamer Kadhafi. AFP PHOTO/GIANLUIGI GUERCIA #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters observe the fighting near the main Moammar Gadhafi compound in Bab Al-Aziziya district in Tripoli, LIbya, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011, where some of the heaviest fighting took place. The compound, which has been heavily damaged by NATO airstrikes, has emerged as one of the centers of government resistance since tanks rolled out and began firing at rebels trying to get in.(AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel fighter walks in downtown Tripoli, LIbya, early Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. US President Barack Obama said Monday at his vacation retreat in Martha's Vineyard, Mass. "The Libyan intervention demonstrates what the international community can achieve when we stand together as one." Obama was careful to emphasize that uncertainty remained and that Gadhafi's regime could still pose a threat. What's more, it will take several months even under a stabilized Libya before its oil fields are producing enough crude to start exporting again. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel fighter from the Tripoli Brigade sits inside the rebel headquarters in the former Academy of Revolutionary Women building, in Tripoli, Libya. Aug. 22, 2011. Forces loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi still held pockets of Tripoli on Monday, resisting the rebel's efforts to establish full control of the city. (Moises Saman/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyan rebel fighters fire towards forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi during fierce gunfire in downtown Tripoli, Libya, Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. World leaders said Monday the end is near for Moammar Gadhafi's regime and began planning for Libya's future without the man who has held power there for 42 years. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters from the Tripoli Brigade take cover during an attack on their makeshift headquarters in former Academy of Revolutionary Women building in Tripoli, Libya, on Aug. 22, 2011. Forces loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi still held pockets of Tripoli on Monday, resisting the rebel's efforts to establish full control of the city. (Moises Saman/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel fighter holds the identification card of a pro-Gadhafi soldier after they were captured in Tripoli, LIbya, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebels say they control most of Tripoli, but they faced pockets of fierce resistance from regime loyalists firing mortars and anti-aircraft guns. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters speak to a suspected pro-Gadhafi soldier after he was captured in Tripoli, Libya, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebels say they control most of Tripoli, but they faced pockets of fierce resistance from regime loyalists firing mortars and anti-aircraft guns. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Moammar Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, top left, gestures to troops loyal to his father in Tripoli, Libya, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. Seif al-Islam, who was earlier reported arrested by Libya's rebels, turned up early Tuesday morning at the hotel where foreign journalists stay in Tripoli, then took reporters in his convoy on a drive through the city. (AP Photo/Imed Lamloum, Pool) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyan rebel fighters embrace at the former female military base in Tripoli, Libya, Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. Libyan rebels claimed to be in control of most of the Libyan capital on Monday after their lightning advance on Tripoli heralded the fall of Moammar Gadhafi's nearly 42-year regime, but scattered battles erupted and the mercurial leader's whereabouts remained unknown. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel fighter climbs on top of a statue inside Moammar Gadhafi's compound Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli, Libya, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. Intense clashes erupted Wednesday between Libyan rebels and regime loyalists in a neighborhood next to Moammar Gadhafi's compound that was stormed by opposition forces a day earlier. The rebels claim they have now taken control of nearly all of Tripoli, but Gadhafi loyalists fired shells and assault rifles at fighters who had captured the Libyan leader's personal Bab al-Azizya compound one day earlier. (AP Photo/Francois Mori) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel raises his guns in celebration near a burning house in the residential area of Col. Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli, Libya, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebel fighters entered GadhafiÅ s fortified compound for the first time on Tuesday, as gunfire and explosions spread across a confused and wary Libyan capital in spasms of renewed fighting. (Bryan Denton/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters trample on a head of Moammar Gadhafi inside the main compound in Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli, LIbya, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. Libyan rebels stormed Moammar Gadhafi's main military compound in Tripoli Tuesday after fierce fighting with forces loyal to his regime that rocked the capital as the longtime leader refused to surrender despite the stunning advances by opposition forces. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A Libyan rebel kisses a bullet belt at the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli on August 25, 2011. Hardened fighters streamed into Tripoli as Libya's rebels sought to deliver a knockout punch to Moamer Kadhafi's diehards and to flush out the elusive strongman, dead or alive. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebels walk under a heavy smoke inside the main Moammar Gadhafi compound in Bab Al-Aziziya in Tripoli, LIbya, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. Libyan rebels stormed Moammar Gadhafi's main military compound in Tripoli Tuesday after fierce fighting with forces loyal to his regime that rocked the capital as the longtime leader refused to surrender despite the stunning advances by opposition forces. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyan rebels celebrate as they move into the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli on August 25, 2011. Hardened fighters streamed into Tripoli as Libya's rebels sought to deliver a knockout punch to Moamer Kadhafi's diehards and to flush out the elusive strongman, dead or alive. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebels parade around a captured statue of an eagle from Col. Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound, in Tripoli, Libya, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebel fighters entered GadhafiÅ s fortified compound for the first time on Tuesday, as gunfire and explosions spread across a confused and wary Libyan capital in spasms of renewed fighting. (Bryan Denton/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A structure burns as Libyans explore the grounds of Col. Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli, Libya, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebel fighters entered GadhafiÅ s fortified compound for the first time on Tuesday, as gunfire and explosions spread across a confused and wary Libyan capital in spasms of renewed fighting. (Bryan Denton/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyans holding a huge flag celebrate overrunning Moammar Gadhafi's main compound Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli, Libya, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. Hundreds of Libyan rebels stormed Gadhafi's compound Tuesday, charging wildly through the symbolic heart of the crumbling regime as they killed loyalist troops, looted armories and knocked the head off a statue of the besieged dictator. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A Libyan rebel walks past the bodies of loyalist fighters lying dead at the south entrance of the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli on August 25, 2011. Hardened fighters streamed into Tripoli as Libya's rebels sought to deliver a knockout punch to Moamer Kadhafi's diehards and to flush out the elusive strongman, dead or alive. AFP PHOTO / Filippo MONTEFORTE #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A resident looks through body armor and uniforms discarded by troops loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi in the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli, Libya, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebel fighters entered Gadhafi’s fortified compound for the first time on Tuesday, as gunfire and explosions spread across a confused and wary Libyan capital in spasms of renewed fighting. (Bryan Denton/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel aims at a portrait of Col. Moammar Gadhafi in the Bab al-Aziziya compound before firing at the image in Tripoli, Libya, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebel fighters entered Gadhafi’s fortified compound for the first time on Tuesday, as gunfire and explosions spread across a confused and wary Libyan capital in spasms of renewed fighting. (Bryan Denton/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighter celebrate as they sit on top of a monument inside Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Bab Al-Aziziya in Tripoli, Libya, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. The rebels say they have now taken control of nearly all of Tripoli, but sporadic gunfire could still be heard Wednesday, and Gadhafi loyalists fired shells and assault rifles at fighters who had captured the Libyan leader's personal compound one day earlier. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel fighter enters a bunker of the main Moammar Gadhafi compound in Bab Al-Aziziya in Tripoli, LIbya, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. Libya's rebel leadership has offered a 2 million dollar bounty on Gadhafi's head, but the autocrat has refused to surrender as his 42-year regime crumbles, fleeing to an unknown destination. Speaking to a local television channel Wednesday, apparently by phone, Gadhafi vowed from hiding to fight on "until victory or martyrdom." (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters seen inside the house of Aisha Gadhafi the daughter of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi in Tripoli, LIbya, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. A defiant Moammar Gadhafi vowed Wednesday to fight on "until victory or martyrdom," as rebel fighters tried to end scattered attacks by regime loyalists in the nervous capital. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters search in the house of Aisha Gadhafi the daughter of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi in Tripoli, LIbya, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters look over personal photos belonging to Aisha Gadhafi, the daughter of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, in her house in Tripoli, Libya, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighter poses for a photo as he sitS on a two seater couch that framed by golden mermaid with the face of Aisha Gadhafi the daughter of Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi in her house in Tripoli, Libya, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. A defiant Moammar Gadhafi vowed Wednesday to fight on "until victory or martyrdom," as rebel fighters tried to end scattered attacks by regime loyalists in the nervous capital. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A Libyan rebel fighter stands in the destroyed building of Moammar Gadhafi's compound Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli, Libya, early Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011. Hundreds of Libyan rebels stormed Gadhafi's compound Tuesday, charging wildly through the symbolic heart of the crumbling regime as they killed loyalist troops, looted armories and knocked the head off a statue of the besieged dictator. (AP Photo/Francois Mori) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A rebel shows off a gold-plated pistol he looted from Col. Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli, Libya, Aug. 23, 2011. Rebel fighters entered Gadhafi’s fortified compound for the first time on Tuesday, as gunfire and explosions spread across a confused and wary Libyan capital in spasms of renewed fighting. (Bryan Denton/The New York Times) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Rebel fighters take shelter as an intense gunbattle erupted outside the Corinthia hotel, where many foreign journalists are staying, in Tripoli, LIbya, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. Libya's rebel leadership has offered a 2 million dollar bounty on Gadhafi's head, but the autocrat has refused to surrender as his 42-year regime crumbles, fleeing to an unknown destination. Speaking to a local television channel Wednesday, apparently by phone, Gadhafi vowed from hiding to fight on "until victory or martyrdom." (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev) #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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A Libyan rebel removes Libya's green flag from a pole outside the airport in Tripoli on August 24, 2011. Rebels who secured the airport over the weekend said it was still under sporadic attack by regime loyalists, with snipers along the road from the capital. AFP PHOTO / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyan rebels loot from the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli on August 25, 2011. Hardened fighters streamed into Tripoli as Libya's rebels sought to deliver a knockout punch to Moamer Kadhafi's diehards and, backed by NATO, to flush out the elusive strongman. AFP PHOTO/PATRICK BAZ #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libyan rebels seize boxes of ammunition hidden underground by Kadhafi's forces in the al-Maser forest in southern Tripoli on August 25, 2011. Hardened fighters streamed into Tripoli as Libya's rebels sought to deliver a knockout punch to Moamer Kadhafi's diehards and to flush out the elusive strongman, dead or alive. AFP PHOTO / Filippo MONTEFORTE #

 Libya Rebels Take Tripoli

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Libya's rebel flag is displayed on a burned car on a check point in Tripoli, Libya, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. Libya's rebel leadership has offered a 2 million dollar bounty on Gadhafi's head, but the autocrat has refused to surrender as his 42-year regime crumbles, fleeing to an unknown destination. Speaking to a local television channel Wednesday, apparently by phone, Gadhafi vowed from hiding to fight on "until victory or martyrdom." (AP Photo/Francois Mori) #

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POPE’S RELICS
POPE’S RELICS: A woman kissed a glass box containing the relics of former Pope John Paul II at the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City Thursday. The box contained a wax figure of the pontiff and a vial of his blood. (Ronaldo Schemidt/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

TIME TO MAKE THE NOODLES
TIME TO MAKE THE NOODLES: A man checked the quality of dried noodles at a factory in Lahore, Pakistan, Thursday. Many Pakistanis consume noodles as an early breakfast before starting to fast for the day during Ramadan. (Yslb Pak/Xinhua/Zuma Press)

WATERED DOWN
WATERED DOWN: Youths were sprayed with a water cannon as they protested Thursday in Quezon, Philippines, against a program that would decrease subsidies at state universities and colleges by more than $12 million. (Noel Celis/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

BLESS THESE BULLETS
BLESS THESE BULLETS: A rebel kissed bullets at the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli, Libya, Thursday. Fighters overran the compound of Col. Moammar Gadhafi this week and their leaders have offered a $1.35 million reward for information leading to his capture. (Patrick Baz/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

MORE RAIN ON THE WAY
MORE RAIN ON THE WAY: A woman covered her head during an afternoon shower in New York City Thursday. Much of the East Coast is preparing for Hurricane Irene, which is expected to hit the metropolitan area this weekend. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

AHEAD OF THE CROWD
AHEAD OF THE CROWD: A protester stood in front of police officers during a demonstration Wednesday in Kiev, Ukraine, against the arrest of former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko. The rally came on the 20th anniversary of Ukraine’s split from the Soviet Union. (Malolietka Ievgen/Demotix)

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HOSED
Firefighters sprayed foam over police officers during a protest at the Minister-President’s office in Brussels Friday. Members of Brussels’ fire brigade are demanding clearer rules for promotions. (Yves Herman/Reuters)

TENT SHIELD
Jordanian police carried tents over their heads to protect protesters from stones thrown by government supporters during a demonstration for political reform in Amman Friday. (Muhammad Hamed/Reuters)

FACTORY FIRE
People marched down Broadway Street in New York City with shirts bearing the names of the 146 people who died on March 25, 1911, in the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire. The fire, at a factory in the downtown New York, resulted in stronger workers’ rights and new fire safety laws. (Justin Lane/EPA)

MEDAL FOR METTLE
Medal of Honor recipient Marine Corps Lt. Corporal Richard Pittman donned his medal during the medal’s 150th anniversary ceremony at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., Friday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

SEEKING HEAT
A man warmed himself at a shelter for victims of a tsunami on the island of Oshima, Japan, Friday. (Damir Sagolj/Reuters)

REBEL GUARD
A Libyan rebel guarded worshipers performing the Friday noon prayer in Benghazi Friday as coalition forces launched a seventh day of airstrikes against the regime of Libya’s Moammar Gadhafi. (Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

ROLLING OUT THE RED CARPET
A red carpet was ready to be rolled out at Wanxiang Group’s electric automobile division in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China, Friday. Wanxiang is China’s biggest auto-parts maker. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

ROCKET EXCHANGE
Palestinians walked past the destroyed office of Hamas prime minister Ismail Haniya in Gaza City Friday. Israeli aircraft attacked four targets in the Gaza Strip during the night, wounding three people, in response to Palestinian rocket attacks on Israel. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

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