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Peter van Agtmael

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War/Photography, on view from Nov. 11 to Feb. 3, is a magnificent, wide-ranging exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. As chief curator Anne Wilkes Tucker explains in the sumptuous catalogue, that slash in the title is important: this is not a show simply of photographs of war. It’s a demonstration and examination of the relationship between the two and how that relationship has changed over time. There are plenty of images of combat, but the catchment area extends way beyond the battlefield–both in space and in time–to include preparations for war, refugees fleeing its consequences, damage to property and the physical and psychological aftermath of conflict. Taken by some of the most famous photographers—more than 280 are showcased—in the history of the medium, by aerial reconnaissance units and unknown combatants and civilians, the pictures are drawn from the archives of photo agencies such as Magnum, military archives and personal family albums. It’s a stunning show, full of well-known pictures, surprising new ones and—if one consults the catalogue—surprises about well-known pictures.

More than a few of the featured pictures have been either faked or staged. That is to put it too simply, for the slipperiness of the distinction between “real” and “arranged”, or “genuine” and “fake”, turns out to be one of the themes of the show. The problem crops up right from the get-go, with Roger Fenton’s famous pair of pictures of the Valley of Death (1856) from the Crimean war—one of which shows cannonballs strewn more abundantly than the other. (slide #1) The scholarly war over which picture was taken first continues to rage. I thought this question had been definitively settled by Errol Morris in his book Believing is Seeing but John Stauffer argues in the catalogue for precisely the opposite conclusion. The “Dead Rebel Sharp Shooter” in Alexander Gardner’s famous image from the Civil War (slide #2) was dragged to the place where he is seen to have died and arranged in such a way that the rifle — not his own but a prop carried by the photographer — added extra pathos.

As with the Civil War, so in the First World War: it was impossible to take pictures of actual combat. One of the reasons why the famous footage of soldiers going over the top at the Battle of the Somme is faked is because it is on film. Filmed at a training ground, it shows a soldier who is shot, falls down, looks at the camera — and folds his arm before dying. Among the most spectacular images of the war, James Frank Hurley’s “An Episode after the Battle of Zonnebeke” (c.1918) (slide #3) seems like a composite expression of our idea of the Western Front — because, it turns out, it is a composite print made from multiple negatives. As Siegfried Sassoon wrote in his poem “Cinema Hero”: “It’s the truth/That somehow never happened.”

The complexity of Hurley’s image is in stark contrast to Wesley David Archer’s photograph of a pilot who has bailed out of his burning plane (c.1933) (slide #4). It is a picture full of suspense because we don’t know whether the parachute is going to open. What we do now know, courtesy of his widow, is that it was done with a model airplane. Armed with this knowledge you go back to the original and… it still looks amazing! You don’t feel cheated so much as admiring of someone who could create such a truth after (or independent of ) the fact.

Everyone is familiar with the doubts that continue to swirl around Robert Capa’s picture of the “Death of a Loyalist Militiaman” (1936) (slide #5) in the Spanish Civil War. No one can agree on exactly the circumstances in which it was made. And so, ironically, while photography is generally assumed to be strong as evidence but weak in meaning, Capa’s photograph has come to resemble painting, of which the contrary is held to be true. Joe Rosenthal’s image of the flag-raising on Iwo Jima in 1945 is an especially complicated case in that it was widely assumed to have been staged, faked, rigged or something like that, even if we can’t remember exactly what is supposed to have gone on because it’s all a bit muddled up with memories of the Clint Eastwood film about what happened.

The full story, as narrated in the catalogue, is that the flag was raised twice — not for Rosenthal’s benefit but, in the words of the Lieutenant Colonel who ordered it to be done, “so that every son-of-a-bitch on this whole cruddy island (could) see it.” (slide #6) How do we know this is accurate? Because there are photographs – i.e. photographs of the sequence of events that led to Rosenthal taking his photograph – to prove it. (see below) In any case, the success of Rosenthal’s image was due to the way that it not only recorded a moment and event but, in doing so, expressed a truth of enduring – even mythic – proportions about the Marine Corps. The same could be said of Len Chetwyn’s iconic picture from the North Africa (1942) campaign: a photograph which proves, at the most basic level, that this was indeed a battle waged by men in shorts! (not shown). The fact that a detail from it is used on the cover of a beautiful Australian edition of Alan Moorhead’s African Trilogy highlights the way that documentary veracity and imaginative truth are mutually supporting. The surprising thing – which turns out not to be so surprising if we consider how perfectly the picture is composed and lit — is that it’s the photograph that provides the imaginative half of that equation. Smoke grenades had indeed been deployed, but for pictorial effect rather than combat effectiveness.

Louis R. Lowery / Bob Campbell / Bill Genaust — The Museum of Fine Arts Houston

Three examples of photographs that documented the sequence of events leading to Rosenthal's iconic photograph of the flag raising on Iwo Jima.

So there is a delicious irony, in a show that is so scrupulous and judicious in its investigation of the relationship between real and doctored pictures that the catalogue seems, in one instance, to have fallen victim to a booby-trap in its midst. John Filo’s photograph of the killings at Kent State in 1970 shows a distraught woman kneeling over the body of a dead student. Unfortunately it so happened that a pole in the background looked like it was coming out of her head. Since this pole was aesthetically unpleasing, it was removed from the picture as published in Life magazine and elsewhere. Amazingly this clumsily doctored version – you can see quite clearly how the pole has been erased – is the one printed in the War/Photography catalogue! (slide #7)

Courtesy of Jeff Wall

Dead Troops Talk (a vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near
Moqor, Afghanistan, winter 1986), 1992

As we move into the contemporary the distinction between art and documentary becomes increasingly hard to sustain—or to put it the other way around, the No-Man’s Land between the two grows ever larger—as shown in works by color photographer Luc Delahaye (slide #8) and photojournalist Damon Winter’s Gurskey-esque view of a plane-load of troops “Flying Military Class” (slide #9). In Regarding the Pain of Others, Susan Sontag argued that Jeff Wall’s “fictional” image “Dead Troops Talk (a vision after an ambush of a Red Army patrol, near Moqor, Afghanistan)” was among the most successful war photographs of recent times. (note: Wall’s image is not part of the War/Photography exhibition) So perhaps Peter van Agtmael’s well-known shot of a line of U.S. troops sheltering from the downdraft of a helicopter in a rocky grey landscape in Nuristan, Afghanistan, in 2007, works on us powerfully for two reasons. (note: van Agtmael’s image is not part of the War/Photography exhibition) First because a compositional similarity to W. Eugene Smith’s shot of Marines sheltering from an explosion on Iwo Jima in 1945 (slide #10) establishes its place in the heroic and noble tradition of documentary photography. Second, because an uncanny resemblance to Wall’s image tacitly acknowledges that the fictive now sets a standard of authenticity to which the real is obliged to aspire.

Peter van Agtmael—Magnum

An American Blackhawk helicopter lands at the Ranch House, an isolated U.S. outpost in the Waigul Valley of Nuristan Province, near Afghanistan's eastern border with Pakistan, 2007.

The relationship between Wall’s large works and the scale and ambition of history paintings has often been remarked on. But Gary Knight’s picture from Dyala Bridge, Iraq, 2003 (slide #11) achieves an even more remarkable relationship with the art of the past. A photograph taken in the immediate aftermath of fighting, it combines the documentary immediacy and evidential power of the best photojournalism with the epic grandeur of history painting.

Geoff Dyer is an award-winning writer and journalist. See more of his work here.

WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath will open at the Museum of Fine Art Houston on Nov. 11, 2012.  The exhibit will then travel to Annenberg Space for Photography, Los Angeles; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; and Brooklyn Museum through February 2014.

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A new book, Photographs Not Taken, conceived and edited by photographer Will Steacy compiles personal essays written by more than 60 photographers about a time when they didn’t or just couldn’t use their camera.

The book, released by Daylight, is a fascinating compilation by a wide cross-section of image makers from around the world and is often filled with thoughts of regret, restraint and poignant self-realizations.

On the eve of the one-year anniversary of Tim Hetherington’s tragic death in Misrata, Libya, we present one of the most eloquent chapters from the book, in which the photographer offers his thoughts on depicting the dead in photographs and the questioning moment he had after making a picture of a dead soldier in Afhganistan:

There are many reasons not to take a picture—especially if you find the
 act of making pictures difficult. I was not brought up with a camera, I
 had no early fascination for pictures, no romantic encounters with the 
darkroom—in fact I didn’t become a photographer until much later on 
in life when I came to realize that photography—especially documentary 
photography—had many possibilities. One thing for sure was that
 it would make me confront any inherent shyness that I might feel. It
 did, but I still find making pictures difficult, especially negotiating and 
confronting “the other,” the subject, and dealing with my own motivations
 and feelings about that process.

This personal debate about making pictures was particularly apparent 
during the years I lived and worked in West Africa. In 2003 I lived as one 
of the only outsiders with a rebel group that was attempting to overthrow 
then-President Charles Taylor. It was a surreal experience—cut off
 and living in the interior of the country, I accompanied a rag-tag army 
of heavily armed young men as they fought their way from the interior 
forest into the outskirts of the capital, Monrovia. Reaching the edges of
the city was an exhilarating experience after weeks of living in a derelict 
front-line town with little food. At one point, the rebels took over the
 beer factory and, after liberating its supplies, turned part of the facility 
into a field hospital where people with gunshot wounds were treated 
with paracetamol. Outside the factory compound lay about five bodies 
of people who, from the look of things, had been executed. A number 
had their hands tied behind their backs and most had been shot in the
 head and, despite the graphic nature, I had no qualms about making 
some photographs of these people.

Not long after, government forces counterattacked to push the rebels out 
of the city. Everyone was exhausted from the lack of sleep and constant 
fighting, and the retreat quickly turned into a disorganized scramble
 to get out of the city. Soldiers commandeered looted vehicles, and I 
even remember one dragging a speedboat behind it in the stampede 
to escape. To make matters worse, government soldiers were closing in
on the escape route and began firing from different directions on the 
convoy of vehicles. One rocket-propelled grenade took out a car behind
ours, and at one point we abandoned our vehicles and took shelter in a
nearby group of houses. I began seriously considering abandoning the rebels and heading out on my own toward the coastline on foot, but luckily thought better of it and got back inside the car with the group I was with.

The road slowly wound its way away from the low-slung shacks of
 the suburbs and back into the lush green forest. Our close-knit convoy 
started to thin a little as some cars sped out ahead while others, laden 
with people and booty, took their time. The landscape slid by as I tried
 to come down and calm my mind from the earlier events—I was in a
 heightened state of tension, tired, hungry, and aware that I was totally 
out of control of events. Just as I started to feel the euphoria of being
 alive, our car slowed in the commotion of a traffic jam. A soft-topped 
truck up ahead that was carrying about 30 civilians had skidded as it
 went around a corner and turned over on itself. A number of people 
had been killed and wounded—probably having the same thoughts of 
relief that I had before calamity struck. Now they were dead and their 
squashed bodies were being carried out from the wreckage. Someone 
asked me if I was going to photograph this—but I was too far gone to be
able to attempt any recording of the event. I couldn’t think straight, let 
alone muster the energy needed to make a picture. I just watched from 
a distance as people mourned and carried away the dead. My brain was
 like a plate of scrambled eggs.

There isn’t much more to add, but I always remember that day and the 
feeling of being so empty—physically, mentally, and spiritually—that it
 was impossible to make the photograph.

Years later, when I put together a book about those events in Liberia, I
 included a photograph of one of the people who had been killed outside 
of the beer factory. I thought it was an important picture but didn’t
 dwell on what it might mean for the mother of that boy to come across 
it printed in a book. My thoughts about this resurfaced recently as I put
 together a new book about a group of American soldiers I spent a lot of 
time with in Afghanistan. They reminded me a lot of the young Liberian 
rebel fighters, and yet, when I came to selecting a picture of one of their
 dead in the battlefield, I hesitated and wondered if printing a graphic 
image was appropriate. It was an image I had made of a young man 
shot in the head after the American lines had been overrun—not dissimilar
 from the one in Liberia. My hesitation troubled me. Was I sensitive
 this time because the soldier wasn’t a nameless African? Perhaps I had 
changed and realized that there should be limits on what is released 
into the public? I certainly wouldn’t have been in that questioning position 
if I’d never taken the photograph in the first place….but I did, and 
perhaps these things are worth thinking about and confronting after all.

—Tim Hetherington

Tim Hetherington (1970-2011) was a British-American photographer and 
filmmaker. His artwork ranged from digital projections and fly-poster exhibitions to handheld-device downloads. Hetherington published two monographs, Long Story Bit by Bit: Liberia Retold (Umbrage Editions, 2009), 
and Infidel (Chris Boot, 2010). His Oscar-nominated 
film Restrepo, about young men at war in Afghanistan, was also released in 2010.
 Tragically, Hetherington was killed while covering the 2011 Libyan civil war.

Photographs Not Taken also features work by Roger Ballen, Ed Kashi, Mary Ellen Mark, Alec Soth, Peter van Agtmael and many others. More information about the book and how to purchase it is available here

On April 22, 2012 from 2:00-4:00pm, MoMA PS1, located in Queens, NY, will host a a panel discussion with contributors Nina Berman, Gregory Halpern, Will Steacy, Amy Stein, moderated by Daylight founders Michael Itkoff and Taj Forer.

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Features and Essays

Syrians in our minds…

Tomas Munita has done great work for the New York Times from over there… I can hardly imagine how difficult the conditions…

Tomas Munita: Fighting Intensifies in Syria (NYT) See also

Tomas Munita: A Day With the Arab League Monitors in Syria (NYT)

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Update Wednesday 8 February 2012:

Time Lightbox posted a slideshow this morning by Italian photographer Alessio Romenzi, on assignment for Time in Homs.  Rather than wait until next week, want to share the link to the work here…

Alessio Romenzi: Syria Under Siege (Lightbox)

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Antonio Bolfo’s NYPD: Impact on NYT Lens…Always loved this work… Saw it exhibited in Perpignan 2010…Definitely worth another look..

Antonio Bolfo: NYPD: Impact (NYT Lens)

Andrea Bruce from Kabul

Andrea Bruce: Children in Kabul (NYT)

Here’s Lauren Lancaster from Kabul too…Completely new photographer to me… See later in this post for Lancaster’s photos from GOP primary in Florida…posted on New Yorker’s Photo Booth

Lauren Lancaster: Youth in Kabul (Le Monde M Magazine)

GOP Primaries

Ricardo Cases from Florida on assignment for Time…Lightbox slideshow…

Plenty got printed in the magazine too…

Ricardo Cases: A Sunshine State of Mind for the Florida Primary (Lightbox)

Charles Ommanney: Newt Gingrich on the Florida Campaign Trail (Newsweek)

Charles Ommanney: US Presidential Campaign 2012 (Reportage by Getty Images)

Peter van Agtmael: On the Campaign Trail with Newt Gingrich (Lightbox)

Lauren Lancaster: Running in Florida (Photo Booth)

Massive Florida Primary gallery on NYT with photos by Heisler,Crowley,Yam,Litherland, Thayer, and Henry…

NYT (various photographers): The Florida Primary

To other issues… Here’s a link to Scottish photographer David Gillanders’  multimedia The Neglected…Finished sometime last year, but only discovered this last week…

David Gillanders: The Neglected : Street Children in Ukraine (Vimeo)

Pete Pin: The Cambodian Diaspora (Lightbox)

Sally Ryan: Black Jews of Chicago (zReportage)

Marvi Lacar: A ‘visual diary’ of depression (CNN photo blog)

Bruno Barbey: Istanbul (Magnum)

photo: Steve Liss

New Yorker (various photographers): American Poverty (Photo Booth)

Evgenia Arbugaeva: Siberian Memories (NYT Lens)

photo: Jason Andrew

Financial Times (Photos by Jason Andrew and Brandon Thibodeaux): Atheism in America (FT)

After reading Toni Greaves’ interview about her Radical Love series last week on BJP, I visited her website and ended taking a look also at the multimedia version of the project, which was posted on Time.com while back… Really enjoyed… Very good audio…

Toni Greaves: Radical Love: The Sisters of Summit, NJ (TIME)

Maija Tammi: Small Sizes and Great Love (Polka) multimedia

Lise Sarfati: She (Guardian)

Stephanie Sinclair: A Day with Warren Buffett (WSJ)

Denis Sinyakov: Moscow’s Migrant Workforce (Msnbc)

Veronique de Viguerie: With Libyan Arms, Mali Fighting Is Revived (NYT)

Adam Ferguson: Karen Rebels Remain Defiant (NYT) Myanmar

Brandon Thibodeaux: War Torn: An Iraq War Veteran’s Story (WSJ channel on Youtube) video

Andre Bruce: Leaving Iraq (NOOR)

Ayman Oghanna: Iraq (Polka)

Luis Carlos Barreto: Tropical Light (NYT Lens)

Lot of new features on Panos Pictures site….

Ivan Kashinsky: Guaranda Carnival (Panos)

Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky: Dance of the Devils (Panos) Gachet and Kashinsky are both represented by Panos, but they also have a common website at Runa Photos. See later in this post for their brand new iPad App…

Xavier Cervera: Revolucion o Muerte (Panos)

Stuart Freedman: The Englishman’s Eel (Panos)

Jason Larkin: Power to the People (Panos)

Sergey Maximishin: The Institute (Panos)

Dean Chapman: Fading Memories (Panos)

Mark Henley: The Vaults (The Atlantic)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Tahrir, 1 Year On (Reportage by Getty Images)

Nadia Shira Cohen: Egyptians (NYT Lens)

Ed Ou: Egyptian Youth (Reportage by Getty Images)

Alessandro Gandolfi: The Catacombs of Las Vegas (Parallelo Zero)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: The Last Nights at the Western Hotel (Lightbox)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Money, God, and Criminals (NOOR)

Liu Tao: Blood, Sweat, and Tears (zReportage)

Maciek Nabrdalik: Faith : Polish Catholicism (VII)

Adrian Fisk: Dilli Purani Dilli Naye (Foto8)

Reed Young: Brownsville (Lightbox)

Phil Moore: DRC Elections (Photographer’s website)

Peter Turnley: Cuba : A Grace of Spirit (Photgrapher’s website)

Michael Carlebach: South Florida (NYT Lens)

Jean-Marie Simon: Guatemala’s War Years (NYT Lens)

Bharat Choudhary: Young Muslims (NYT Lens)

Jordi Ruiz Cirera: The Mennonites of Bolivia (Foto8)

Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko: Grozny: Nine Cities  (PDN Photo of the Day)

David Dawson: Working with Lucian Freud (Lightbox)

Michael Tsegaye: Fighting Forgotten Tropical Diseases (BBC)

Thomas Hulton: The Lam Family of Ludlow Street (NYT Lens)

Espen Rasmussen: Transit (The Atlantic)

New Yorker (photos by Sylvia Plachy and Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao): Battle of Panoramas

Andrew Burton: Best of 2011 (Photographer’s website)

iPad Apps

Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Short Stories: From Ecuador to Tierra del Fuego by Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky

Polka Magazine iPad App

Interviews

Gina #12 Oakland, CA 2009, courtesy Brancolini Grimald  by Lise Sarfati

Lise Sarfati (Telephoto)

Lise Sarfati (Guardian) related: exhibition review

Steve Pyke on reviewing over 8,000 images for the World Press Award (PicBod)

Steve Pyke from the World Press Photo Award on fifteen hour days (PicBod)

World Press Photo:  Members of the jury share their perspectives on the winners and the judging process.

Ed Kashi (Bangkok Post)

Anthony Shadid (Mother Jones)

Doug Mills (NYT Lens)

Barton Silverman (NYT Lens)

James Whitlow Delano (Asiasociety)

Harry Hardie on Lynsey Addario & Tim Hetherington’s ‘In Afghanistan’ exhibition

Ed Ou (Wired Rawfile blog)

Venetia Dearden (e-photoreview)

Kael Alford (Vimeo)

Yunghi Kim (Tiffinbox)

Leo Maguire (BJP)

Guy Martin (Ideas Tap)

JB Russell (shootlove)

Elinor Carucci (PicBod)

Brett Ziegler (NYT Lens)

Articles

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Update 8 Wednesday 2012:

Just as I had finished the post yesterday, we got news that Magnum photographer Sergio Larrain has passed away.

Sergio Larrain (1931-2012)

photo: Rene Burri

Here’s a Slate slideshow celebrating Larrain’s work…

LONDON—Baker Street Station, 1959.

Slate: Sergio Larrain 1931-2012

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PDN: Swedish Journalists Endure Inhumane Conditions in Ethiopian Jail

Slate: Can Five Great Photographers Really Collaborate? | Postcards from America: A Magnum Collaboration

Lightbox: Postcards From America: The Box Set

photo: Nick Waplington

FT: Ways of Seeing

The Sacramento Bee: To our Readers: The Sacramento Bee fired longtime photographer Bryan Patrick

UNHCR: Nansen Award winner turns her lens on the Flowers of Afghanistan

BJP: The Photographers’ Gallery will reopen its London premises on 19 May with an exhibition of Edward Burtynsky’s Oil

Phaidon: Getting to know the face behind the photograph

BJP: Crowdfunding platform Emphas.is launches publishing arm

BJP: National Media Museum is set to start work on its London-based gallery

BJP: Firecracker Grant

BJP: Photographer wins copyright infringement case

NYT Mag 6th Floor blog: The Auckland Project

PDN: US Falls To #47 On Press Freedom Index, Thanks to Occupy Crackdowns

TIME Lightbox Tumblr: Joachim Ladefoged had only 8 minutes to photograph Messi

Allen Murabayash: Why I love Photography (PhotoShelter blog)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Lucy Nicholson | Related on Reuters photo blog

Dallas Morning News Photo blog: Big Miracle the movie – The story behind the real photo | How a photo from an almost botched Arctic assignment inspired a Drew Barrymore film

FT: Photographer Lise Sarfati studies the lives of teenagers and young women in America

Firecracker: February 2012 newsletter

The National Press Club: Attorney details backlash against photojournalists

Verve: Sam Phelps

Verve: Anne-Stine Johnsbåten

Verve: Rafael Fabrés

LA Times Framework blog: Six Photography Game Changers

PDN: Greenfield Wins Sundance Director Prize

BJP: Keeping the tabs: The best account management applications for photographers

New Yorker: Close Inspection: Magnum Contact Sheets (Photo Booth)

Mike David: Where’s the line on toning photos, especially for contests? (Mike Davis blog)

multiMedia 

new issue…. 7.7 : Documentary Photography Digital Magazine

Exhibitions

Labyrinth Photographic Printing : ‘A Year in Development’ Exhibition’ – 17th February – 1st March 2012 : London

Behind the Scenes of Steve McCurry’s Rome exhibition (Phaidon) video

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Justin Maxon

Magnum Emergency Fund Announces 2012 Grantees (Lightbox)

Aperture 2011 Portfolio Prize Finalists

Sony World Photography Awards 2012 Shortlist Announced | on BJP

PDN Annual

FotoEvidence : Book Award

Foam Talent call 2012 now open

Getty Images relaunches creative grants programme

Gordon Parks Photo Contest Deadline July 2

Agencies and Collectives

Magnum Photos : February 2012 newsletter

NOOR newsletter February 2012

Reportage by Getty Images: Peter Dench joins Reportage

Reportage by Getty Images: Introducing John D McHugh as a featured contributor

TerraProject Newsletter

Crowd funding

UK Uncensored by Peter Dench (Emphas.is)

Faded Tulips by William Daniels (Emphas.is) featured on Telephoto

Trading to Extinction by Patrick Brown (Emphas.is) Related on NYT Lens

Workshops

Visual Storytelling in an Open Society: workshop for Egyptian photographers : Deadline for applications is Sunday FEBRUARY 12, 2012 [link to info on Lightstalkers]

2012 Noor – Nikon Masterclass : South Africa | on BJP

MediaStorm multimedia storytelling workshop in London at the Frontline Club on February 20.

Jobs

Bloomberg: Staff Photo Editor – London

Photographers

Naomi Harris has a new website…

Naomi Harris

New website also by Stuart Freedman

Ricardo Cases

Eric Thayer

Eunice Adorno

Ivan Kashinsky

Ed Ou has added a multimedia section to his website…

Ed Ou : multimedia

Adrian Fisk

Jess Ingram

Jordi Ruiz Cicera

To finish off…. ‘War Photography and Weddings’. Ahem. That really is an interesting business card via @Kiehart

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I arrived in Charlotte, N.C. early on the day of the South Carolina primary and headed straight to Tommy’s Ham House in Greenville. Newt Gingrich was giving an electrifying speech inside as a crowd milled around outside. The previous week I’d covered my first presidential primary in New Hampshire, where many events were disrupted by attention seekers and protesters. Occupy Wall Street supporters came to a Mitt Romney rally and were quickly thrown out by police. At a Ron Paul event, a man with a boot on his head named Vermin Supreme made chicken noises and claimed that if he were elected president, every American would get a pony.

South Carolina was more restrained. There were no active protesters. A lone Ron Paul supporter kept a silent vigil a respectful distance away. Tommy’s Ham House continued to serve breakfast. I didn’t try their famous ham, but their hot cakes were excellent. Gingrich left in a bus with a giant portrait of his face emblazoned on the side. It started pouring and the crowd hid under signs that read, ‘Newt 2012. Rebuilding the America We Love.’

Next, Gingrich stopped at a nearby middle school serving as a voting station. He patiently shook every hand of the assembled crowd, numbering close to a hundred. There were only a few journalists, compared to New Hampshire, where the media often ringed the candidates three or four deep.

One of the last stops of the day was a Gingrich campaign gathering at a Chick-fil-A in Anderson. Like most Gingrich events, it was packed to the brim, with supporters pressing their faces against the restaurant’s windows to get a peek. Sometimes the event locations seemed arbitrary. Why a Chick-fil-A, which was founded in Georgia, instead of a locally-owned business? Another journalist speculated it was because of the widely-promoted Christian values of its founder, Truett Cathy. All the candidates were trying to woo the evangelical base, and nearly everyone at the event was caucasian.

Gingrich would beat Romney to win the South Carolina primary that evening. The victory party that night was restrained, though 1970s and 1980s rock-and-roll classics blared in the packed ballroom. There were a few brief speeches before Gingrich arrived to thank his supporters and attack Barack Obama. Most of the attendees left immediately after the speech was over. I asked where everyone was going and was told the private parties would continue deep into the night.

Peter van Agtmael is a photographer represented by Magnum. His work from Iraq won a World Press Photo award in 2007. More of his work can be seen here.

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Features and Essays

Some interesting features from the upcoming National Geographic Magazine’s December issue…

David Guttenfelder: Japan’s Nuclear Refugees (NGM)

photo: Chia Ming Chien

Various photographers: The City Solution (NGM)

Jim Richardson: King James Bible (NGM)

A lot of people raving about this last week online…

Seamus Murphy: A Darkness Visible | Afghanistan (MediaStorm)

Beautiful photos by Getty’s Daniel Berehulak from the Sonepur Mela fair in India…

Daniel Berehulak: The Sonepur Mela (TIME) India

This week’s TIME US edition cover story…

Peter van Agtmael: An Army Apart (Lightbox)

I wished I had received the  US edition as opposed to Time Europe with Platon’s smirking Berlusconi…

Noticed van Agtmael’s cover is a crop of one of the frames seen in the Ligthbox slideshow…

Magnum photographers: Paris in Winter (Newsweek)

Adam Dean has the cover of Newsweek International this week with a portrait of Ai Weiwei…slideshow on the magazine’s website…

Adam Dean : Ai Weiwei (Newsweek)

Nicolas Righetti: Syria: Posters of Bashar al-Assad (Newsweek)

Ed Ou: Syrian Refugees in Turkey (NYT)

Ed Ou: Somali-Kenyan Border (Polka) multimedia

Andrea Bruce: Leaving Camp Victory in Baghdad (NYT)

Definitely worth checking out…This year’s Joop Swart Masterclass participants’ projects…

2011 Joop Swart Masterclass galleries (World Press Photo)

Sanjit Das: The End of Splendid Isolation? (Panos) Bhutan

Ivor Prickett:  Free Libya (Panos)

Zed Nelson: South Sudan (Guardian)

From VII…

Adam Ferguson: Looking Home, At War (VII) Same in VII Magazine

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: The Family (VII)

Ed Kashi: America’s Uninsured (VII)

Ed Kashi: Ze Peixe: A Life at Sea VII)

Sim Chi Yin: China’s Rat Tribe (VII)

Donna Ferrato: Domestic Abuse (NYT Lens) Ferrato’s website

Alessandra Sanguinetti: The Sixth Day (Photo Booth)

Peter Hapak: The Art of War: Honoring the Fallen for a Lifetime (Lightbox) Hapak’s website

Chantal Heijnen: Bronxites (NYT Lens)  Heijnen’s website

August Bradley: Portraits of 99 from Occupy Wall Street (NYT Lens) Bradley’s project’s website

Brian David Steven:  War veterans (BBC)

Adam Amengual: Leaving the Life: Portraits of Former Gang Members (Lightbox)

Fredrik Naumann: Return to Utøya (Panos)

Mario Tama: Nascar (CNN photo blog)

Jesse Burke: Deer Stands (Lightbox)

Tiana Markova-Gold: Prostitution in Morocco (Lightbox) Markova-Gold’s website

Martina Bagicalupo: One woman’s story of surviving 20 years of conflict in Uganda (MSNBC)

Paolo Woods: The Land of Prophets (Institute)

Shelby Lee Adams: Of Kentucky (NYT)

Danny Wilcox Frazier: South Dakota’s Badlands (MSNBC)

Matt Eich: Hunting Alligators in Louisiana (MSNBC)

Abbas: Kolkata (Magnum)

Greg Brown: Aerial Photos of Ground Zero (NYT Lens)

Kim Badawi: Gaza Stripper (Stern) You can see the full set at Reportage site

Patrick Farrell: Haitian Black Gold (ZReportage)

Narciso Contreras: Little Burma (ZReportage)

Ali Arkady: The Day Labourers in Northern Iraq (Foto8)

Wendy Marijnissen: Because I’m a Girl : Rape in Pakistan (Photographer’s Vimeo)

Misha Friedman: An Invisible Epidemic (PDN Photo of the Day)

Interviews and Talks

Christopher Anderson at the 2011 World Press Photo Masterclass (World Press Photo)

Sebastiao Salgado (CPN)

David Guttenfelder : Outside the Frame: Rare chance to see inside Fukushima (MSNBC)  Related by Guttenfelder: Inside Fukushima (Guardian) | AP photographer Guttenfelder’s website

Don McCullin on Social Documentary Photography (Vimeo)

Ben Lowy (Photo Booth)

Ed Kashi : What is Photojournalism (Kashi blog)

Andrew Hetherington:  The day I photographed the great Joe Frazier (WTJ?)

Huge congratulations to Antonio Bolfo for becoming fully represented Getty Reportage photographer last week!

Antonio Bolfo : Attending Joop Swart Masterclass (Getty Reportage Tumblr)

Susan Seubert (Youtube)

Martina Bagicalupo (MSNBC)

KC Ortiz (Juxtapoz)

Kate Peters (The SIP)

Tessa Bunney (e-photoreview)

Articles

The month in photography…

photo: George Georgiou

Guardian: The Month in Photography  | The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Josef Koudelka, Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Helmut Newton, Terry Richardson and Walker Evans.

photo: Chris Hondros

Peter Beaumont: Reporting Libya: freelance coverage, full-time dangers (Guardian)

Clare Morgana Gillis: What I Lost in Libya (The Atlantic)

The Atlantic:  ’Under Fire’: a new documentary shows that war is hell for journalists

David Campbell: The elusive enemy: Looking back at the “war on terror’s” visual culture

BagNewsNotes: Tents: The Overarching Symbol of Occupy (BNN)

The Atlantic: CNN Photojournalists Lose Jobs to Cheaper, Better Cameras

photo: William Eggleston

Guardian: Paris Photo 2011 – in pictures

Lightbox: Paris Photo 2011 Spotlights Sub-Saharan Africa

BJP: New festival to offer grants to photographers

WSJ: How an Image Becomes an Icon

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize winner annouced and exhibition opened….

BJP: Taylor Wessing winner

photo: Jooney Woodward

Guardian: Taylor Wessing portrait prize: another animal, another girl with red hair | Was Jooney Woodward’s shot of a red-head holding a guinea pig really the best of the 6,000 entries? And what makes her think it’s an ‘unsettling’ work

Evening Standard: Taylor Wessing exhibition review

photos: Pete Marlow

Telegraph: Magnum Contact Sheets book reviewed

BBC: Magnum Contact Sheets

Lightbox: The Singular Approach: Chien-Chi Chang’s Contact Sheet Chronicle

BBC: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II sets photo record

PDN: Gursky’s Print Goes for $4.5 Million, Observers Say: Huh?   | Related: Nick Turpin blog: Value Added?

Joerg Colberg: How much are photographs worth?

PDN: Ad Banned in UK for Showing Super Skinny Model

Guardian: Photographer David Trood’s Best Shot 

Verve: Corentin Fohlen

Verve: Beth Yarnelle Edwards 

BJP: The alleged murderer of photojournalist Trent Keegan has been acquitted because of a lack of evidence

Chicago Tribune: iPad Apps for Photojournalists – Tuesday Tips

multiMedia, Apps, and Publications


Foto8 back issues on Issuu

The Condition One App : Features in NYT Lens | Lightbox | BJP

Jason Larkin has transformed his project Cairo Divided into a free 32 page newsprint publication…I picked up a copy from Jason himself last week at the World Press Photo exhibition opening here in London…do go order one…

Cairo Divided : Project website

Between Land : Project website

Awards, Grants, Competitions, and Exhibition opportunities

Magenta Flash Forward 2012 submissions open

The Street Photography Awards 2012

International Festival of Photojournalism calling for entries

Brad Vest Named College Photographer Of The Year (NPPA)

Wine Photo winners

PhotoPhilanthropy – Student Grant Round 5 

An opportunity for young Asian photographers…

Scholarship for Diploma in Photojournalism run by the Konrad Adenauer Asian Center for Journalism at the Ateneo de Manila University (ACFJ) : The deadline is on Friday, 10 February 2012.

One Shot: The City – Intl Photo Awards

Crowdfunding, Initiatives, and Causes

Fancy Alec Soth taking your portrait? You do need deep pockets, mind…

eBay - An opportunity to purchase a portrait session with Alec Soth : Proceeds go to a charitable cause

PhotoVoice Auction 2011 Preview Exhibition  : A preview exhibition of prints in the PhotoVoice Auction of Exceptional Photographs 2011  : Monday 14th – Friday 18th Nov :  11am-6pm, late night Thursday to 7.30pm  Venue: La Galleria Pall Mall, 30 Royal Opera Arcade, London, SW1Y 4UY v

Events and Exhibitions

A Photo says 1000 Words? The Ethics of Photojournalism : 23 November 2011 : Southbank Centre : London

BJP  Vision11 

A Desperate Journey by Antonio Olmos : Jersey Arts Centre : Mon 14 Nov 2011 to Sat 26 Nov 2011 | more info

Workshops and Education

Foundry Photojournalism Workshop 2012 : Thailand : July 29 – August 4 :  Info: Eric Beecroft, the co-founder of the Foundry Photojournalism Workshops, has just announced that it was ready to accept early registrations ($100 deposit, non refundable, and deducted from the total tuition amount) until January 15, 2012. Early registration guarantees a spot and precedence in the choice of instructor.  The 2012 Foundry Photojournalism Workshop will be held in North Thailand from July 29- August 4, 2012.   For regional students (South Asia– India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Tibet and South East Asia-Thailand, Burma, Vietnam, Phillippines, Laos, Cambodia,Indonesia, Malaysia) the tuition is $475. For all others it is $975 US dollars. Payment is via Paypal.

MA program in Photojournalism at the Mid-Sweden University : Starts 2012

Agencies and Collectives

Panos newsletter

NOOR newsletter

TerraProject newsletter

Photographers

Christina Fallara

Eric Michael Johnson

To finish off… This week’s stunning video… earth seen from above

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In September, photographer Peter van Agtmael traveled to South Carolina for “The Other 1%,” which appears in next week’s issue of TIME. Here, he writes about the experience of photographing new recruits at Fort Jackson military base.

At Fort Jackson, South Carolina, hundreds of recruits gather in the pre-dawn darkness in black vinyl shorts and grey t-shirts with the words “ARMY” across the chest. Lit by floodlights, the soldiers line up and wait for their turn to do push ups and sit ups while drill sergeants scream at them if they slow their pace. They are from America, but also Afghanistan, Italy and Sweden. Most of them are teenagers, others in their late twenties and thirties. There are refugees from the economic crisis and others looking for adventure or for a profound change in unfulfilling lives. They aren’t training to be in a combat role—they will go into the Army’s vast support staff, becoming mechanics, cooks, or technicians. If they deploy to the wars, they will likely live on the large support bases and see little of the country in which they are helping to fight a war.

My escort around the base is a soldier with a Combat Infantryman’s badge on his uniform, which he earned in Iraq. I tell him he is lucky he’s gotten a quiet job working at the Public Affairs Office stateside given the frequent deployments, and he is silent for a while. Eventually he tells me that he’d received a traumatic brain injury when his humvee was hit by a roadside bomb. Now he has trouble concentrating and loses his equilibrium when he walks. Over time, his injury will prove fatal. The rest of the day he talks about his wife and children and about how much he misses being in the field.

Later in the day, the soldiers walk through a course designed to teach them to recognize improvised explosive devices (IEDs), the number one killer of soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. In every instance, they miss the warning signs an IED is buried: an invisible tripwire, a pressure plate. A jumpy young soldier, short, thin and shrill explains in detail the consequences of such mistakes in the field. After each mistake he tells stories from Iraq of fellow soldiers and friends being eviscerated, others decapitated. The recruits listen, their eyes wide, but they still don’t find a single device. One drill sergeant whispers to me that no matter how well the recruits are trained, they’ll miss most of the hidden bombs. When I was in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2006-2010, the first warning of an IED was usually the explosion. One time it was hidden in a dead animal carcass, another time in a pile of garbage, yet another was buried in a curve in a dirt road.

In another exercise they go into a room and CS gas is pumped in. They put on their gas masks before entering, and as the gas enters, they are instructed to remove them. Moments later they come out weeping and gasping and choking. Snot pours out their nose and a few collapse. The drill sergeants are on top them immediately, squatting, pointing and barking at them to get up and keep moving. Stumbling to their feet, they flap their arms to dissipate the gas.

They do exercises in trust, team building, and endurance, but much of the training is centered around preparing them for the realities of combat. In one exercise, the soldiers enter a warehouse. A dummy pumps fake blood while several soldiers mimic brutal injuries, screaming and writhing and some faintly smirking. The recruits are in confusion, drill sergeants continue to scream, and after a few minutes they dress the injured and get the casualties out of the kill zone while others pull security. A man in a black billed hat films the action. The instructors shake their heads and grimace but say the exercise will run smoothly in a few weeks after much practice. Indeed, most soldiers injured on the battlefield survive even the most grievous wounds.

Many of the men and women will eventually deploy to our wars. Most will live and some may die. But as they toil on, there is no shortage of recruits for the Armed Services.

Peter van Agtmael studied history at Yale and has since photographed throughout Africa, Iraq, Afghanistan and the U.S. His work from Iraq won a World Press Photo award in 2007. More of his work can be seen here.

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Features and Essays

Occupy Wall Street… Terrific photos by Ashley Gilbertson…

Ashley Gilbertson: #Occupy Wall Street (VII) Gilbertson’s earlier Wall Street series: Down on Wall Street and After the Fall

Spencer Heyfron: Faces of Occupy Wall Street (Newsweek) Heyfron’s website

Nina Berman: Beyond the Fringe of Protest (NYT Lens)

From Chicago…

Jon Lowenstein: Occupy Chicago (NOOR)

Guillermo Cervera: Trading War for Waves (NYT Lens) Cervera’s archive

Brent Stirton: Virus Hunter (TIME Lightbox)

Libya…

Jehad Nga: Return to Libya (TIME Lightbox)

Michael Christopher Brown: Libya After Gaddafi (Newsweek)

Bryan Denton: Pictures from a Rebellion (Corbis blog) Libya

Afghanistan..

Ben Lowy: Life During Wartime (NYT Mag) | 6th Floor blog: Hipstamatic in Kabul

Larry Towell: Afghanistan 2011. Part II (Magnum)

Last Friday, President Barack Obama announced complete withdrawal of US forces from Iraq by the end of 2011…

In August, the New York Times took a look back at the war in Iraq on the frontlines and at home in the US…I don’t think I ever shared the slideshow…Various photographers’ work included…Below frame from Todd Heisler’s iconic Final Salute…(Remember seeing it first time as it was exhibited in Berlin as part of the touring World Press Photo 2006 exhibition, and being really amazed by it. Actually another Iraq series from the same exhibition, by Peter van Agtmael,  is etched in my memory as well. I saw the WPP 2006 show literally two weeks before I began studying photojournalism, so it had special impact.)

photo: Todd Heisler

New York Times (various photographers): Iraq: Drawing Down and Moving Ahead (NYT)

Mauricio Lima: The Circus Comes to Baghdad (NYT)

Ayman Oghanna: Iraqis (Photo Booth)

Last week I posted a link to Stephanie Sinclair’s Hillary’s Angels on VII…This week we have Diana Walker’s photos of Hillary herself on Lightbox. The series is also TIME cover story on all markets…Lightbox slideshow opens with a frame that is printed double spread in the magazine…

Diana Walker: Hillary Clinton (LightBox)

Lynsey Addario: Road Trip (VII)

Lynsey Addario: Somali-Kenyan Famine (VII)

Moises Saman: Awaiting Tunisia’s Vote (NYT)

Tomas van Houtryve: Open Secret (VII Magazine)

Nancy Borowick: Mother’s Cancer (TIME Lightbox)

Alberto Maserin: Portraits of Priests (TIME Lightbox)

Timothy Fadek: Chongqing, China (Polka) “The biggest city you’ve never heard of.”

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The BRIT School (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter (Panos)

Jack Delano: Puerto Rico (NYT Lens)

Larry Fink: Vanity Fair’s Oscar parties (Photo Booth)

Lara Platman: Harris Tweed (BBC)

Toby Smith: Energy in China (NYT Lens)

Edward Burtynsky: View From Above  (Lightbox)

David Degner: Egypt’s Unfinished Revolution (FT Magazine)

Mustafah Abdulaziz & Justin Maxon: Providence (Vimeo)

Mikolaj Nowacki: Parting (VII Mentor)

Will Hartley: In Between Dreams (Foto8)

Interviews and Talks


Martine Franck (WSJ)

Check out DevelopPhoto’s Vimeo…

Develop Photo Vimeo Channel for Photography related videos  (DevelopPhoto Vimeo) Includes recent videos of photographers such as Ed Kashi, Donald Weber, and Peter van Agtmael speaking about the future of photography. Those originally from PhotoQ’s series Facing the Future here.

Dominic Nahr (The Fader)

Lars Tunbjork (New Yorker Photo Booth)

Ron Haviv (Takepart.com)

Juergen Teller (BJP) Teller on  his controversial shoot with Kristen McMenamy for 032c magazine.

Ziyah Gafic (PDN)

Matt Eich (Conscientious Extended)

Rankin (IdeasTap)

Shannon Jensen (10Answers) Jensen is one of the recent additions to Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent. Her portfolio here.

Articles

photo: Nicole Tung

Mike Kamber: On Young Photographers and Conflict’ in Libya (NYT Lens) On photographing conflict for the first time

Russia Beyond the Headlines: Yuri Kozyrev: Walking the revolution road 

photo: Franco Pagetti

Telegraph: Baptism of fire: the story of the VII photo agency (Telegraph) When seven photojournalists decided to join forces, it was just days before 9/11 happened. Their role has been in sharp focus ever since

Gizmodo: How to Be a Citizen Journalist Without Getting Killed

Flavorwire:  A Look at Patti Smith’s First Major Photography Exhibition, ‘Camera Solo’

Toronto Star Photo Blog: Rick Madonik tells about his Libyan fixer

Capital New York: For Tim Hetherington’s close friend and ‘Restrepo’ subjects, mounting a South Bronx gallery show of the late photographer’s work becomes a tribute

PDN: What do you charge for editorial retouching, and how? (PDN)

Telegraph: Photography at the V&A

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Adnan Abidi 

New Yorker Photo Booth:  Great Mistakes, Vanessa Winship’s favorite accidental photo

IJNet: Five Google tools journalists don’t use but should

Source: Top Ten Tips on getting the most of your photography degree

Penumbra Project: Surviving as a photographer in the new economy

photo: Eli Reed

Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 3 (IdeasTap)

Joerg Colberg: What Happened to the Mid-Career Artist (Conscientious)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.23: Gaddafi’s death

David Campbell: Agencies as publishers: a new approach to photojournalism (DC blog)

Marco Bohr: Google Street View and the Politics of Exploitation (Visual Culture Blog)

Verve: Valerio Bispuri (Verve)

Also in new breed of documentary photographers.. Chien Chi-Chang (Verve)… ahem…

Guardian: Occupy London empty tent claims based on ‘rubbish science’  (Guardian) Scientist specialising in camouflage said photographers with thermal imaging equipment were not using right camera settings

Adam Westbrook: 10 common video storytelling mistakes (and how to avoid them) (AW blog)

Adam McCauley: Covering 9/11 with Ashley Gilbertson (Storify)

BJP: The Third Floor Gallery is Cardiff is looking for £12,000 to expand

BJP: Spotlight on crowdfunding: Photographer Neil Osborne is raising funds to document how one man saved the Black Turtle

BJP: The London Street Photography Festival + Grant Smith to present “Stand Your Ground” at BJP’s Vision

BJP: The Open Eye Gallery is reopening in new premises. BJP asks the director and curator what we can expect to see

Petapixel: Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Videos

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #3

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #2

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #1

Page One : Inside The New York Times : trailer

Vicki Bennett: Deconstructing the way we perceive space in cinema (Contact Editions)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Andrea Morales Wins TIME’s Next Generation Photography Contest | Morales’ website

FotoVisura Grant. The deadline is December 5, 2011.

PhotoPhilantrophy Grant Rounds Schedule

Blogs

NPPA Visual Student

Crowd funding

Go and support my friend Amanda’s project…She’s already past the halfway mark…

Amanda Rivkin : BTC Oil Pipeline (Emphas.is)

Events and Exhibitions


Giles Duley : Becoming the Story : Artist Talk: Wednesday 2 November 6-9pm (talk starts at 7pm) Private View: Thursday 3 November  7 – 9pm Exhibition Runs: 4 – 26 November : KK Outlet : London

Hell and Back Again by Danfung Dennis : Screening : November 7 :  Foto8 :  London

Amazon : exhibition in aid of Sky Rainforest Rescue : Somerset House, London :  photography from Sebastião Salgado and Per Anders Pettersson

Magnum Photos symposium to discuss the role of contact sheets in photograph :  26 November : London

The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar

Jobs

MediaStorm’s Spring Internship : Deadline November 1

B&H is hiring a full-time Photo Related Blogger

NPR : assistant producer for multimedia

Reuters freelance TV news producer

Agencies and Collectives

Statement Images is looking for new members

Zeppelin

Photographers

Suzanne Lee

Jussi Puikkonen

Tania Lee Crow

As a final note… Busiest day so far on the blog last Friday with 2,870 views and looks like October is on its way of becoming to be the month with most traffic ever…around 37,000 views…Thanks for visiting.

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Features and Essays

I love 15th of every month as the following month’s National Geographic features hit their feature hub… Two good photojournalism pieces in the October issue…which I’m very much hoping to receive in the mail…We became annual subscribers for the first time…Time mag too… Buying single copies ends up getting rather costly…

Terrific photos by Kitra Cahana…Subject: “Moody. Impulsive. Maddening. Why do teenagers act the way they do? “…

Kitra Cahana: Teenage Brains (NGM: October 2011) Cahana’s website

Mark Leong: Ulanbaatar, Mongolia (NGM: September 2011)

If you enjoyed Leong’s essay, do also see Timothy Fadek’s Mongolia work…done last year, but definitely worth having a look, if you aren’t familiar with it…

Timothy Fadek: Mongolia: Golden Promises (Photographer’s website: September 2011)

Uriel Sinai documents life West Bank settlements as Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas prepares to ask the United Nations for statehood…

Uriel Sinai: Inside West Bank Settlements (Time: September 2011)

Related…

Amnon Gutman: The Promised Land (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Julien Goldstein: Ramallah: Portrait of a West Bank City (MSNBC: September 2011)

Stefan Boness: White City (Panos: September 2011) Tel Aviv

To other stories…

Dominic Nahr: Somalia: The Catastrophic Famine (Magnum: September 2011)

Larry Towell: Afghanistan 2011: MEDEVAC and the Taliban Close-up (Magnum: September 2011)

Denis Dailleux: Scenes from a Ghana Witch Camp (Newsweek: September 2011)

Mads Nissen: Chinese Roulette (Panos: September 2011)

Warrick Page: Pakistan Floods (Guardian: September 2011)

Seamus Murphy: 17 Years in Afghanistan (Life: September 2011)

New York Times: Repressing the Religious Majority (NYT: September 2011) Photographer’s name withheld probably for security reasons

Brendan Corr: Faithful Albion (Panos: September 2011)

Chiara Tocci: Life After Zog (Foto8: September 2011) Tocci’s website

New Yorker: Beyond Words: Photography in the New Yorker (New Yorker: September 2011)

Sam Phelps: Train Portraits Pakistan (Photographer’s website: September 2011)

Sam Phelps: Gadani Ship Breaking Yard, Pakistan (Photographer’s website: September 2011)

Steven Siewert: Viva Las Vegas Rockabilly! (Agence Vu: 2011)

Piotr Malecki: Where Meat Means Money (Panos: September 2011)

Martina Bacigalupo: Wanawake, Being a Woman in Congo (Agence Vu: 2011)

I didn’t know Ara Güler is a Magnum photographer…That’s what Guardian states anyway, and indeed his photos are in the Magnum archive, eventhough he is not listed in the members….Enjoyed these Istanbul frames…Especially since we are heading there end of November for Veronica’s 25th birthday…

Ara Güler: Istanbul (Guardian: September 2011)

Newsweek: The Mexican Suitcase: History Lost and Found (Newsweek: September 2011) Related in NYT T Magazine

Ron Haviv: Blood on the Grass (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Ron Haviv: The Making of Dan Choi (Global Post: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: In the Light of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey After 9/11 (TIME LB: September 2011)

TIME Lightbox featured some of the great work available for purchase at Friends of Anton to support Anton Hammerl’s children…

photo: Kenneth Jarecke

TIME Lightbox: Banding Together for a Fallen Colleague: The Friends of Anton (TIME LB: September 2011)

Also available at Friends of Anton…Yuri Kozyrev’s iconic Libya photo… Remember the moment he took it?  Others running away, but Yuri still shooting behind Tyler Hicks.

It’s great so many photographers have donated prints…Now they need people buying ‘em!

More features…

Allison Payne: College Bound (TIME LB: September 2011)

Zhe Chen: Bees (Inge Morath Foundation: September 2011)

Elinor Carucci: Pregnancy, Birth, and Motherhood (TIME LB: September 2011)

Lori Grinker: Piecing Together an Ancestral Puzzle (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Greg Constantine: The Places Where Nowhere Is Home (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Andre Liohn: Arab Spring (Photographer’s archive: September 2011)

Etienne de Malglaive: Storming Tripoli (Photographer’s archive: September 2011)

Interviews

Photographer Kitra Cahana talks about her NatGeo assignment about teenagers…

Kitra Cahana (NG: September 2011)

Toby Smith (MorningNews: September 2011)

Martin Parr and his fancy new camera…he seems to be pretty excited about it as you can see below…

Martin Parr (Youtube: September 2011)

Although, it’s not really his camera, is it? Magnum have partnered with Nintendo…. Related  on PopPhoto and PetaPixel

Some really good interviews on the Ideas Tap website…

George Georgiou : Photographer (IdeasTap: September 2011)

“I invest myself emotionally in the people I photograph – not just to gain their trust but also to make myself feel comfortable. I’m not a quick, brash photographer – I was encouraged at Newport to understand compassion and humility and understanding, and that’s something I’ve tried to adhere to. “- Ivor Prickett

Ivor Prickett : Photojournalist (IdeasTap: September 2011)

“Realistically, unless you’re an individual like Ryan McGinley, it’s going to take 10 years to establish yourself: five years to pay the rent and five years to hone your practice. But the beauty about photography is, if you make it work for you, you never have to retire” – David Birkett

David Birkett : Photography Assistant (IdeasTap: September 2011)

Laura El-Tantawy (Burn: September 2011)

Martin Roemers (Noorderlicht festival: 2011)

Hans Aarsman (Ted Talks video on Conscientious: 2011)

Sebastian Junger (Guardian: September 2011)

Damon Winter (APE: September 2011)

Erroll Morris :  Truth Outside Photographs (NPR: September 2011)

Doug Mills (C-Span: 2008)

Jason Howe (BBC: September 2011)

Fernando Moleres (BJP: September 2011)

Michael Mack : Mack Books: From print to the iPad (BJP: September 2011)

Platon on Perry: Behind the Scenes of the Cover of TIME (TIME LB: September 2011)

Philip-Lorca diCorcia (ASX: 2011)

Kosuke Okahara (La Lettre: September 2011)

Philip Cheung (Thisisthewhat: 2011)

Pete Brook (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Pete Brook (BJP blog: September 2011)

Articles

John Stanmeyer has written more about working for National  Geographic…

Must read. John Stanmeyer: The Amazing Yellow-Bordered Magazine, Part II (Photographer’s blog: September 2011) Side note: Noticed Stanmayer’s blog presents us a differently processed file from his NGM Girl Power story. His own vision?

Joao Silva back at work…

NYT Lens: Joao Silva at the White House (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Olivier Sarbil was injured in Libya last week…

French freelance journalist wounded in Libya as NTC battles on (Vanguard: September 17, 2011)

Olivier’s friends have shared info on Facebook that he is now back in France, at Percy Hospital in Paris – a military hospital that specializes in injuries from the battlefield. I wish him good recovery. | Olivier’s website

Very good piece on pricing your work….

Jessica Hische: The Dark Art of Pricing (Jessica Hische blog: 2011)

Guardian: Joel Sternfeld’s First Pictures: the opening chapter of a colourful career (Guardian: September 2011)

photo: Peter van Agtmael

Leo Hsu: HomeFrontLine at Silver Eye (Foto8: September 2011) the exhibition

photo: Christopher Anderson

BJP: iPublish: Photojournalists turn to the iPad to tell their stories (BJP: September 2011)

BBC: On Bruce Davidson Subway photos (BBC: September 2011)

Foto8: Preview of Jocelyn Bain Hogg’s new book The Family (foto8: September 2011)

Thames and Hudson: Magnum Contact Sheets: Design # 2 – The Jacket (Thames and Hudson blog: September 2011)

David Campbell: Who Believes Photographs (DC: September 2011)

PDN: Burmese Photojournalist Sentenced to 10 More Years (PDN: September 2011)

APE: Real World Estimates – Magazine Article Reprints by Jess Dudley (APE: September 2011)

Unbelievable….

Poynter: Daily Mail lifts from WP, then asks its reporter for help finding photo (Poynter: September 2011)

Life: Taking Great Portraits (Life: September 2011)

Huffington Post: Reuters Raises Profile With Marquee Hires, Editor Aims To Become ‘Best In The World’ (HP: September 2011)

The 14 Most Influential Cameras of All Time (Adorama: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Attila Balazs (Guardian: September 2011)

Guardian: Wolfgang Tillmans’s best shot (Guardian: September 2011)

photo: Jason Lee

Reuters: Unmasking the masked boy (Reuters blog: September 2011)

NPR: A Teenager’s Photo That Helped Inspire Libya’s Revolutionaries (NPR: September 2011)

Crowd funding…

PhotoShelter : 14 Tips to Crowdfund Your Next Photo Project (PS: September 2011)

Social Media Examiner: 11 Tips for Crowdfunding: How to Raise Money From Strangers 

Events

Epen Rasmussen : Transit : Frontline Club : 7pm Thursday : 22 September

multimedia

World Press Photo Enter

Awards, Grant, and Competitions

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize shortlisted works seen in the Guardian last week… (see that bigger here)

BJP: Shortlist unveiled for Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2011

International Photography Award 2011 | Deadline extended | Entries close 26th September 2011

Unicef POY 2011 (Lightstalkers)

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2011 Winners

Congratulations to Matt Dunham and other winners at The Picture Editors’ Guild Awards…

Journalism.co.uk: AP photographer overall winner in press photography awards |slideshow The Picture Editors’ Guild Awards 2011 (Guardian: September 2011)

BJP: Deadline approaching for Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award

Young Photographer of the Year Competition 2011 

Screenings

MSF Delivers 3D film exhibition at Spitalfields market in London from 22nd to 27th September…I went to Duckrabbit/MSF 3D photofilm premiere on Monday at Royal Society of Medicine here in London, I was very impressed.

Videos

Annie Leibovitz : Life Through a Lens 

Nick Turpin: In- sight

Portfolio reviews

Roof Unit Portfolio Reviews 

Photographers

Zalmai

Samuel Aranda

Jamie-James Medina

Scott Goldsmith

Katherine Leedale

Mary Turner | archive

To finish off… Dingle!!!!

Final end note…The Twitter feed has now 20,000 followers. Can’t be all bots,so thanks for following.I’ll try my best to keep the tweets relevant and interesting…

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Features and Essays

Tenth anniversary of the 9/11 is now passed us, but let’s start with some of the features related to it…Lot of good coverage on the New York Times’ web pages, obviously…First, Eugene Richards’ multimedia of his Stepping Through Ashes…

Eugene Richards: Stepping Through Ashes (NYT Lens: September 2011)

NYT Magazine slideshow ‘Images from a Post 9/11 World’..includes various photographers’ work… Benjamin Lowy, Lynsey Addario,Peter van Agtmael, Ashley Gilbertson, and others… also links to the articles, which their images originally illustrated…

After 9/11, National Guard and police patrols had become part of the commute at Grand Central Terminal. Security was increased further after the Madrid bombings. Related article: “Lesser Evils.”  photo: Antonin Kratochvil/VII

New York Times Magazine: Ten Years’ Time: Images from a Post 9/11 World (NYT Magazine: September 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson has some new work on the New York Times site also…

Ashley Gilbertson: Remembering Lost Loved Ones (NYT: September 2011)

Todd Heisler: The Moment Before, and After (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

Fred. R. Conrad: The Faces of a Towering Project (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Magnum: 9/11 and Aftermath (Magnum in Motion: September 2011)

Susan Meiselas: Ground Zero Artifacts and Construction (Magnum: September 2011)

Scott Goldsmith: Flight 93 and Shanksville, PA: The Forgotten Part of 9/11 (TIME LB: September 2011)

To other features…

Sanjit Das: East Africa Crisis (Panos: September 2011)

New work by last year’s Canon AFJ winner Bacigalupo, whose exhibition ‘My Name is Filda Adoch’ impressed a lot of people at Visa…

Martina Bacigalupo: Mogadishu, Somalia (Agence Vu: September 2011)

Patrick Brown: Bengal’s Burden (Panos: September 2011)

Espen Rasmussen’s In Transit project has now a dedicated website…

Espen Rasmussen: Transit (Project website: 2011)

Afghanistan…

Hipstas by Zalmai on Lens blog…

Zalmai: In Afghanistan, ‘Unbelievable Force of Life’ (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Norfolk on New Yorker Photo Booth…

Simon Norfolk: Postcard from Afghanistan : Echoes of Wars Past (New Yorker: September 2011)

Alixandra Fazzina: Pakistan: Preparing for disaster in south Punjab (Guardian: September 2011)

Mitch Dobrowner: The Storms (TIME Lightbox: September 2011)

Have another look at Medecins Sans Frontieres’ and VII Photo’s Starved for Attention campaign online… There’s a travelling exhibit going around the States this autumn…

photo: Marcus Bleasdale

MSF and VII Photo: Starved for Attention 

Andrea Bruce: Conservative Muslims in Russia (Washington Post: September 2011)

Christian Als: The Disappeared Generation (Panos: September 2011)

Moises Saman: Detained Sub-Saharan Africans in Libya (Magnum: September 2011)

Foreign Policy  have a three-part series online featuring Kate Brooks‘ work from Afghanistan, Iraq, Egypt, and Libya…The photos are taken from her new book

Kate Brooks: What War Looks Like (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: Those Who Face Death (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: From Revolution to War (FP: September 2011)

Johannes Eisele: The Casualties of War: Afghanistan’s Medevac Missions, Up Close (TIME LB: September 2011)

Stanley Greene: A Drop of Blood between Turkey and Syria (NOOR: 2011)

Kozyrev’s Tripoli photos now also on the NOOR site…

Yuri Kozyrev: The Battle for Tripoli (NOOR: September 2011)

Ruben Reyes: Foreign Laborers in Dubai (NYT Lens: September 2011) Reys’ website

Japan…

William Daniels and Espen Rasmussen: Six Months On (Panos: September 2011) Japan

Jake Price: Japan six months after tsunami (BBC: September 2011)

Ed Kashi: Eye Contact (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Laura El-Tantawy: The Veil (TIME LB: August 2011)

Edward Keating: Blue Highway (TIME LB: September 2011)

Anthony Suau: The 99ers (TIME: September 2011) Long-term unemployed in America

Mauricio Lima: Few Treatment Options for Afghans as Drug Use Rises (NYT: August 2011)

Jean Gaumy: Climate challenge : The Indonesian case (Magnum: September 2011)

David Trattles: Girl Boxers of Calcutta (Foto8: September 2011) Trattles’ website

Jessica Earnshaw: At a Bronx Hospital, a Teenage Milestone (NYT Lens: September 2011) Earnshaw’s website

Interviews

First some 9/11 anniversary related interviews…

Robert Clark : 9/11 (burn magazine: September 2011)

Lynsey Addario : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Samantha Appleton : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Joel Meyerowitz : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Meyerowitz interview also on TIME… looks like he’s working with Leica S2 here…

Joel Meyerowitz : Ground Zero, Then and Now (TIME: September 2011)

Eric Hoepker : 9/11 (CNN: September 2011) CNN’s Errol Barnett speak to photographer Thomas Hoepker who took one of the most controversial 9/11 images

Steve McCurry on 9/11…

Steve McCurry :  memories of 9/11 (Phaidon: September 2011)

Interesting thing I noticed the other day looking at some of McCurry’s 9/11 photos on his blog was that he has a frame almost exactly like one of Nachtwey’s… The two men must have stood pretty much side-by-side…The colours are different, but I presume it’s because Nachtwey was shooting C-41 and McCurry E-6…It’s fascinating how similarly the two photographers framed the scene…

Marco Grob : on the Making of Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience (TIME LB: September 2011)

Steve McCurry (Leica blog: September 2011)

Steve McCurry : Revealed – the true story behind the ‘Afghan Mona Lisa’ (Phaidon: September 2011)

Olivier Laurent’s excellent Yuri Kozyrev interview in British Journal of Photography…

Must read. Yuri Kozyrev : on covering revolutions in the Middle East (BJP: September 2011)

Kozyrev interview also on Lighbox…this about one of his Iraq War photos, one the most memorable and powerful images of the entire conflict by anyone I’d say…Couldn’t help but notice the file has been re-processed…

Yuri Kozyrev The Aftermath of 9/11: Ali Abbas (TIME LB: September 2011)

Fred Ritchin : Ritchin letter regarding the Q&A (Wired Raw File: September 2011)

Broomberg and Chanarin (ph-research.co.uk: 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen : Via Panam part 2 (Nikon blog: September 2011)

David Chancellor talks about ‘Hunters” (Polka: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Outposts (National Media Museum Vimeo: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Ways of Looking (National Media Museum: Vimeo 2011)

Martin Parr : Parrworld (Phaidon: 2011)

Nadav Kander (Conscientious: 2011)

Mario Tama : 9/11 (Dallas News: September 2011)

Jodi Bieber : Capturing Aisha (Montreal Mirror: September 2011)

Catalina Martin-Chico (BJP: August 2011)

Tyler Hicks : Gaddafi Family Album (NYT Lens: August 2011)

JR (The Atlantic: 2011)

Jared Soares (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Pete Brook (thoughtsonphotography: September 2011)

Articles

9/11 related articles… I particularly enjoyed reading and looking at this one from TIME Lightbox…

photo: Jonathan Torgovnik

TIME Lightbox: 9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (TIME LB: September 2011)

How magazines picked their 9/11 anniversary covers…

NYT: Magazine Covers on a Topic Known All Too Well (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

NPR: Sept. 11 Through The Eyes Of VII, Magnum And Life (NPR: September 2011)

Guardian: 9/11 anniversary: photographers recall day of horror (Guardian: September 2011)

New York Times: The Reckoning: America and the World a Decade After 9/11 (NYT: September 2011

Thomas Hoepker: I Took That 9/11 Photo (Slate: 2006) Photographer Thomas Hoepker on Frank Rich’s column, and why he thought his picture was too “confusing” to publish in 2001.

David Campbell: September 11, 2001: Imaging the real, struggling for meaning (DC blog: September 2011)

Alan Chin: Pushpins on a calendar (BagNewsNotes: September 2011)

Chris Floyd: The 9/11 Patriotic American Road Trip (Photographer’s Blog: September 2011)

Peta Pixel: How Photographers’ Rights Have Eroded Since September 11th (Peta Pixel: 2011)

Other articles…

photo: David Alan Harvey

Ideas Tap: Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 2 (Ideas Tap: September 2011)

UK Photographer’s Rights (Amateur Photographer: September 2011)

The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books…includes a shout-out to Luc Delahaye at Tate Modern..only three prints on show though (installation shot I took with my phone when I visited the show in August)…I enjoyed them…

Jenin Refugee Camp, 2001. Luc Delahaye.  From the exhibition New Documentary Forms at Tate Modern, London…worth a visit also for Mitch Epstein’s American Power…not so keen on the other three…

The Observer: The Month in Photography September 2011

NY Daily News: To honor slain photojournalist Tim Hetherington, fellow photog opens docu-film gallery in Bronx (NY Daily News: September 2011)

Reportage by Getty Images: Tom Stoddart shoots the ICRC  ’Health Care in Danger’ campaign

Photo Stories: Webdoc Favourites (photo-stories-org: 2011)

BJP: Photographers’ Gallery delays reopening until 2012

BJP: Photojournalism award launched in tribute to fallen photographer Lucas Dolega

BJP: Guillaume Herbaut and Bruno Masi win the Web Documentary Award at Visa Pour l’Image

Magnum: Steve McCurry Wins First Leica Hall Of Fame Award  (Magnum: 2011)

New Statesman:  The ambiguous art of Taryn Simon (New Statesman: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Oded Balilty (Guardian: August 2011)

Verve: Stuart Freedman (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Verve: Pete Marovich (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Pete Kiehart: Once: A New Magazine Model (Photo Brigade: September 2011)

BJP: Fujifilm commits to instant photography (BJP: September 2011)

Agency Access: Agency Access Acquires ADBASE and FoundFolios to Become Most Robust Photo Marketing and Illustrator Marketing Resource

10 Famous Street Photography Quotes You Must Know (Erik Kim Photography blog: September 2011)

Pulitzer-winning photojournalist resigns rather than lay off staff

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

UNICEF Pictures of the Year Award 2011 (link to PDF)

Five finalists for the inaugural Reminders Project Asian Photographers Grant

Tracy Baran Award : $5000 grant for an emerging US female photographer

Congrats to all this year’s Foam Magazine Talents…

photo: Ivor Prickett

Foam Magazine Talents 2011

Royal Photographic Society : Annual Awards 2011

Guardian Student Media Awards shortlisted

Click About It

Books

Kate Brooks: In The Light Of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey After 9/11

Conversations with Photographers (Conscientious)

Out November 1…

VII: Questions Without Answers 

Ken Jarecke: Husker Game Day – Farewell Big 12 

burn 02

The Family by Jocelyn Bain Hogg

Crowd Funding

Laura El-Tantawy just launched an Emphas.is crowd funding campaign to help her continue her work in Egypt…go and have a look…

Laura El-Tantawy: In the Shadow of the Pyramids (Emphas.is)

Agencies

VII September 2011 newsletter

Shell Shock Pictures

24Productions

Events

British Journal of Photography : ‘From stills to moving images’ at The Social on Monday 26 September, at Barrio Central, Poland Street, London W1F 8PS

Exhibitions

“If I don’t photograph it, it won’t become known.” Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus : At War : Berlin : 10 September – 4 December 2011

Chris Floyd: 140 Characters  : Host Gallery : 3 November – 17 November 2011 : press release

Photographers

Pamela Chen

Robert Nickelsberg

Patrick Smith

Diana Markosian

Conor O’Leary

Magda Rakita

Videos

Danfung Dennis’ film Hell and Back Again opening in US theaters on Oct 5…

Hell and Back Again Trailer

C.J Chivers, Andre Liohn: Lethal Lessons in Misurata (NYT: 2011)

Aperture education Youtube channel

Workshops

Magnum Photos workshop Munich, 10-14 Oct with Pellegrin, Dworzak & Anderson

Jobs

Open Society Institute : Exhibition Coordinator

Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University

To finish off…

I was reading Finnish magazine Kuukausiliite this morning which had an article about Google Street View along with some photos by artist Jon Rafman… Noticed one of the images was similar to one by Mishka Henner…Looks like Henner and Rafman have used the same Google Street View frame for these two…

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