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Richard Avedon

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Javier Arcenillas

Jisu Ashram

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Only a hundred miles from Kolkata, but immersed in a jungle in which time seems to stand still, a Jesuit missionary group has expanded the meaning of being called “parents”.

In its mission “Jisu Ashram” hosts over a hundred children from families of agriculturists of lower castes. There are a thousand children and parents to represent the only hope for the future of a new generation of young Indians who are suffering, with concealed virulence, an abrupt transition to the modern era, the era of big cities, which work in the field and differ little from slavery.

 

Bio

Humanist. Freelance photographer, member of Gea Photowords.

He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that border and set upon any reason or human right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

He is a psychologist at the Complutense University of Madrid. He has won several international prizes, including The Arts Press Award, Kodak Young Photographer, European Social Fund Grant, Euro Press of Fujifilm, Make History, UNICEF, SONY WPY, Fotoevidence POYI.

Currently he is carrying out new ideas in parallel with traditional journalism to spread his projects, and he is making up Audiovisual Projects with diplomatic work.

 

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This fall, Amsterdam—known for its innovative photo community— will welcome a new photography festival to its Dutch district. Called Unseen, the festival hopes to be a festival that, well, viewers have never seen before, with a focus on new and emerging talent as well as an aim to showcase never-before-seen work from established favorites including Richard Avedon, Steven Klein, Helmut Newton and Edward Steichen, among others.

Taking place from Sept. 19-23 at Amsterdam’s Westergasfabriek, the fair comprises more than 50 galleries hailing from around the world. With photography from places as diverse as Japan and New York, Dubai and Finland, the scope of the work will range from documentary to conceptual to experimental. Highlights include Miles Aldridge’s Immaculee #3 (Red Madonna), 2012, which reaffirms the long standing relationship between photography and iconographic painting, but pushes the boundary of what we expect as a viewer by asking the virgin figure to maintain eye contact and acknowledge the image maker. Also of interest is Zanzibar, 2010, by Chloe Sells. The American photographer explores the idea of land and nostalgia through her experimental darkroom C-prints. Colorful and graphic with bold colors and strong shapes, yet abstract and ambiguous, her images inspire thoughts of place and placelessness.

While there are many photography fairs around the world, Unseen works to offer a few additions to the typical fair. There will be a collection of affordable photographs, all priced under 1,000 euro (approximately $1280), to both help young photographers reach a new audience, as well as allow the young collector, or photography appreciator to invest in affordable work. And for the book connoisseur, Offprint Amsterdam will be at the fair, curating a new collection of self published and limited edition books.

You can learn more about the galleries featured and the day-to-day events here. Unseen is a project initiated by Foam, Platform A and Vandejong.

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Elena Perlino

A Sea of Light

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essay foreword by Machiel Botman

“Let’s call it the yellow photograph for now: a street sign with half an arrow, a woman touching the sign and looking at where the arrow points. Behind it all a yellow sea of light, a colored landscape, cityscape that is too good to be true.

(who-ever said that things must be true)

Elena Perlino’s photographs are not carefully constructed images, all have the sensation of immediacy, as if she is passing by all the time. One might call what she passes by ‘little moments’ that, had she not been there, would have stayed unnoticed. In a world where everything is constructed, reality and fantasy, these ‘little moments’ escape us often, and when someone shows them to us we might not accept them.
Some make it easy for us, Richard Avedon’s Boy and tree in Italy is one of these beautiful floating moments, but all the same boy and tree are carefully orchestrated in a pose that we know, that we have come to accept. Perlino’s photographs are made of different stuff and at first glance one might say she does not make it easy on us.

The woman in the yellow photograph seems to accept reality as it is, by looking into the obvious direction where the arrow points. Someone who knows about clothes might tell us the woman is upper-class and waiting for a taxi. That’s where the truth begins and ends and begins again.
To me this woman is an immigrant, coming from yellow country, waiting to be collected to go somewhere else, somewhere where all is supposed to be better, where the sun always shines. Yellow country is still very much part of her, that’s where she is rooted, that’s where she is leaving behind those she loves, those she hates. Yellow country still follows her and I am afraid it always will.

Photographs like this always make me wonder. Where does the photographer come from, where does she go? Is Elena from yellow country, collecting proof some people are leaving? Or is she a future girl, pulling in people with invisible threads?
Good photography, like good writing, or good cinema, leaves the viewer free to do as he wants and in that way Perlino’s images, perhaps one more than the other, do not make it hard on us at all.
She has paved wide roads for us to walk on, with lots of light and exotic colors, with the presence of people, she is a people girl. There are gas stations staring at us with big eyes that look like lights, there is a man about to touch the cigarette to rid it of too much ash, there is a nude woman showing a muscle behind her skin, there are ghosts in the street, shit. But apart from what there is, we are free to make our own context, to decide what it all means. Until not very long ago, this would freak out the sensible world because this maker fits in no box. I hope dearly that by now we can accept these images as strong and beautiful gifts that need no explanation, that just need a little imagination.

My only worry concerns the messenger, the photographer if you like. She appears to be a lonely soul, detached from then and there – I hope she accepts these gifts as means to stop now and then, to get out and touch.”

 

Bio

Elena Perlino (b.1972) grew up in Piedmont, Italy. She graduated with a degree in History and Cinema from the University of Turin and attended at Reflexions Masterclass in Paris. Since 2003 Elena has been working on human trafficking and migration in the Mediterranean area. She was selected as a Nominee for Magnum Emergency Fund 2011.

Elena Perlino is currently running a photography project about Nigerian trafficking on Kickstarter.

 

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If a photographer cares about the people before the lens and is compassionate, much is given. It is the photographer, not the camera, that is the instrument.”—Eve Arnold

Photographer Eve Arnold, who died Thursday morning at the age of 99, is probably best remembered for her celebrity photographs of Marilyn Monroe, made over the span of a decade from the early 1950s to those taken on the set of the movie star’s final film, The Misfits. But Arnold also traveled the world to make equally exceptional photographs of the poor and disposed.

Arnold, the daughter of Russian-Jewish immigrants, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1912. In the late 1940’s, she studied photography—alongside Richard Avedon—under inspirational art director Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in New York. Her first photo story documented African-American fashion shows in Harlem and the project would lead directly to her being granted unprecedented access by Malcom X to document the Black Muslims and the way they worked over the next two years.

In the early 1950’s, she began working for the photo news publications of the day, first for Picture Post, then Time and Life magazines. And in 1957 she became the first woman photographer to join Magnum Photos.

She will perhaps be best remembered for her exceptional photographs of people: the famous, politicians, musicians, artists —among them Malcolm X, Joan Crawford, Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman, Jacqueline Kennedy and Monroe. “I look for a sense of reality with everything I did,” she once said. “I didn’t work in a studio, I didn’t light anything. I found a way of working which pleased me because I didn’t have to frighten people with heavy equipment, it was that little black box and me”

But it is the long term reportage stories that drove Arnold’s curiosity and passion. She traveled extensively to make work on regions that had been off limits to the west—to China, Mongolia, the Soviet Union, and also to Cuba, South Africa and Afghanistan. In 1971 she made a film, Women Behind the Veil, going inside Arabian harems and hammams.

Arnold continued to work for respected publications, most notably the Sunday Times color supplement. In 2003 she was honored with an OBE in recognition for her services to photography. Her work is renowned for its intimacy. Whether photographing celebrity or the everyday, Arnold’s portraits are magical, memorable and enduring.


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BBC Viewfinder Blog is doing a series of articles this week, each one by a different author looking at the world of photojournalism from a number of angles….

Articles – Michael Kamber: Photojournalism Today (BBC Viewfinder: December 2010)

Articles -  David Campbell: Photojournalism in the age of image abundance (BBC Viewfinder: December 2010))

Articles – Guardian: The Month in Photography (Guardian: December 2010) New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, with images by William Eggleston, Gerda Taro, Bill Brandt, W Eugene Smith, Richard Avedon and many more.

Books…books…..and books…..

A lot of talk about these couple of booklists during the last few days…

Articles / Books – Guardian: Sean O’Hagan: 2010′s best photography books: my personal pick (Guardian: December 2010)

Articles / Books – Guardian: Photography books of the year – reviews (Guardian:  December 2010)

Books The Friends of Phonar Book List (Phonar: December 2010) “We contacted some of the worlds most inspirational photographic practitioners, thinkers, authors and publishers and asked them for a book nomination that “is notable/ inspiring/ seminal/ provocative, in it’s narrative structure/approach or perhaps in it’s ‘discussion’ of narrative” “

Another two book lists…

Articles - Little Brown Mushroom: Alec Soth’s Top 10+ Photobooks of 2010 (LBM: December 2010)

Blogs Best PhotoBooks of 2010 by Jeff Ladd (5B4 blog: 2010)

Damon Winter has done a series 360 degrees panoramas of US Soldiers in Afghanistan for the New York Times’ A Year At War series

Features and Essays – Damon Winter: Panoramas: Views From a Year at War (NYT: December 2010)

Features and Essays - TIME: The Best Portraits from TIME 2010 (TIME: December 2010)

Features and Essays - Camine Galasso: Too Painful to Remember, or to Forget (NYT Lens: December 2010) the book

Features and Essays - Katja Heineman: Living with HIV (AARP: 2010)

Features and Essays - Danny Wilcox Frazier: Detroit (burn: December 2010

Features and Essays – Shiho Fukada: Christians in Iraq (NYT: December 2010)

Features and Essays - Tyler Hicks: Blast in Kandahar Kills Six (NYT: December 2010)

Kudos to New York Times…….they commit to hiring Joao Silva, full time…

Articles - Nicholas D. Kristof: What Makes an Employee Proud (NYT: December 2010)

Articles – NYT Lens: A Special Visit for Joao Silva’s Recovery (NYT Lens: December 2010)

Articles – Guardian: Photo Editor Roger Tooth: William and Kate: Mario Testino fails his history test (Guardian: December 2010) If the royal family must commission official portraits, let’s have some stiff formality – not this 80s sofa warehouse effort

VideosThe Genius of Photography (Youtube: 2010)

Interviews and Talks - Joop Masterclass 2010 Masters Jodi Bieber and Alejandro Castellote (WPP: 2010)

InterviewsEamonn McCabe (PDN: December 2010) What makes a lasting image, and how choosing photographs for a history book differs from choosing images for daily news stories.

InterviewsMatt Craig (Leica blog: 2010) Matthew Craig, a professional photographer and photo editor, lives in the core of the Big Apple — New York, NY. A founding member of MJR and Page One Photo Editor for The Wall Street Journal.

InterviewsAdam Patterson (LCC Head of College blog: December 2010)

PhotographersUlysse Lefebvre

Grants – PDN: Grant deadline: Humble Arts Foundation accpeting applications for $1,000 grant until Dec 30. (PDN: December 2010)

Parallelo Zero has a added yet another photographer to their roster

Agencies – Parallelo Zero photographers: Simone Cerio (PZ: 2010)

Amanda Rivkin on Verve Photo….

Articles – Verve Photo: Amanda Rivkin (Verve: December 2010)

Awards - BJP: Canadian photographer wins Travel Photographer of the Year title (BJP: December 2010)

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