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Shelby Lee Adams

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Gordon Stettinius, Govenor, a collaboration with Terry Brown


Gordon Stettinius, Senator, a collaboration with Terry Brown

I'd like to offer up another option in our presidential election. Senator or Governor Gordon Stettinius has my complete support! I've known Gordon Stettinius for a number of years, and there is something about the man that resonates deeply with me. He's irreverent, he's self deprecating, he's smart, and is serious in the best possible way. He makes things happen and takes chances, and he is charging full speed ahead into new arenas of the photo world, and succeeding mightily as he goes.


Self Portrait with Murphy

In the last two years, Gordon has gone from being a father, photographer, and educator, to a father, photographer, educator, publisher, gallerist, and just about everything else. His new gallery venture, the Candela Gallery, includes the Candela Unbound Invitational Exhibition and the submission date is April 6th, 2012. And are you listening? There is NO entry fee.


Walker & Mary Kathryn, Richmond, VA

INTERVIEW

We first connected in the toy camera orbit, right after you were winding down Eye Caramba--which seems like a very long time ago…can you go back in time and share your journey into photography and to launching a very early e-zine?

Eye Caramba, the online magazine, was sort of a blip when I think of it now but I published I think 2-3 issues a year for a few years. Really, it is a little quaint to think about how the web magazine then looked because the graphics had to be so pared down, and one 35 kilobyte image to a page was about as much as most people had time for. Try to put two images on a page and you may as well get up and fix dinner while the page loaded. I guess the real reason for starting something online was I had been wanting to mimic SHOTS magazine because I loved the community that revolved around that particular magazine. I was living in Minneapolis at the time but had an occasion to visit Bob Owen in Texas in 1995 or so just to get a feel for what type of work went into the publishing of SHOTS. And I was mulling over doing something like what Bob was doing or maybe a tabloid like Photo Metro used to be... But then soon after, Bob called me up and said his wife had taken a job in Minneapolis and he was moving to town in just a few months. So, it struck me as somehow a little off to try to mimic SHOTS but in the same town. And so I tabled the idea but thought that an online magazine might have some potential.

The interwebs were less fantastical then and many photographers needed help with compressing their work and nothing was particularly fluid on the content management side but I bumped along for a while. As it turns out, I was just a poser. SHOTS is still around luckily though and Russell Joslin has done a great job over the years after taking over for Bob. So, I eventually took over Eye Caramba as my own site as I always liked the sound of it.

As to the toy camera side of the equation, I had been using plastic cameras for almost as long as I was making pictures. The low fidelity world was sort of a pre-information wilderness also back then - another reason I loved SHOTS actually was the toy camera issue. So, when the Great Lakes toy site morphed into toycamera.com I was pretty enthusiastic about all of my new friends. And we actually had a pretty good run there for some years. I guess I have always enjoyed being part of a photo community and that may answer some of the later questions as well.


Ninjas, Richmond, VA

Where did you get your sense of humor and your smart irreverence for anything with a whiff of B.S.?

The slightly embellished response would be that once I started taking photography more seriously, and started running with more and more photographers, I realized that there was a whole lot of earnestness in this world. And truly, I believe that photography does have the potential to bring attention to some of the injustices of the world or to make real what can only be felt in one's heart or illuminate the issues facing us at most every turn. Really photography can do many of these great things and more... but somehow, I realized that people who were often doing more or less exactly what they wanted to do and then through the miracle of retro-elaborate proto-academical post rationalization, were conjuring all this compelling and deep jargon for their work. To read the accompanying artist statements, to certain otherwise quite fine work, was occasionally mind-blowing. How on earth did every single photograph in the fine art world get so imbued with such unfettered self-importance? I am not a cynic through and through but we can get pretty up our own arse sometimes. And I will lump myself in that crowd too.


Hands Off, Washington DC

Why the toy camera?

After I graduated from school, I wound up trying a couple different toy cameras when I was busy trying all manner of vintage equipment. My degree was a BA in studio art, doing mostly printmaking and drawing. So a lot of my photo education was post-college with the buying of thrift store cameras and different gear. I just didn't believe in the connection between expensive gear and 'better' images. I was more drawn to pinhole and plastic lenses and peculiar unpredictability.


Emmett, Richmond, VA

Before Gita Lenz came into your life, had you any thoughts of being a publisher? (Gordon's essay on Gita Lenz is here).

No, not really. Though I was drawn to the idea of zines and community as I mention above. Mostly, I just wanted to see that Gita got the type of book I felt she deserved and I was not thrilled with my first forays I to Print On Demand.

I can only image what a satisfying result it was to not only get the book published in her lifetime, but to have her experience a solo exhibition….

I wish I had really gotten this whole enterprise going a few years earlier because Gita was not fully of sound mind towards the end but still it was a beautiful thing to see her amazement about the book and the pride she took in her photography.


Gita Lenz Empire State Building, late 1940s - 1950s

Salt and Truth definitely put Candela Books on the radar of the book and photo world and what a terrific selection as a follow up to Gita Lenz. How did you come to work with Shelby Lee Adams?

Basically, it all comes down to timing. I started thinking about what sort of second book I might follow Gita's with and I had just assumed it would be a smaller project. But Shelby and I started talking when he was just starting to circulate a new book proposal and after a bit of research where I sorted out how I might improve my distribution from the first time out, I started in earnest discussing with Shelby about what his proposed book might look like. We both had some ideas about how his fourth book might differ in certain ways from his earlier books. So we had several conversations before I think we both felt it was a good match between us.

With both books, what has been the most satisfying part as a publisher? And what has been the most difficult or unexpected part of the process?

There are a number of elements to the process that provided a pretty good learning curve but really a lot of the challenge has to do with budget and time management. It isn't terribly tough when you are working with good people. In my case, I started by working with a design firm - Scout Design - I had worked with on several smaller projects and they are so detail oriented that I was free to have the larger concepts in the front of my mind and trust them to do their work.


Limited Edition of Salt and Truth

How many books do you plan to publish each year, and how do you go about finding your projects?

We are bringing one book out in the fall and expect to bring two books out next year. More news on this very soon.

As of last fall, you are now not only a photographer, publisher, and educator, but now a gallerist! How did the Candela Gallery get started?

A couple of years back, I started looking for a new studio space. And then the idea evolved into having a space that might function as a studio and office for Candela. Then the space I wound up investing in was in the downtown arts district and we have pretty amazing foot traffic. So the idea evolved some more, since I intend to work with quality photographers, I figured that putting their work up was a fairly natural decision. I was not quite prepared for the level of work it takes to run a gallery but everything has been very well-received so far. This year is scheduled now and I have gotten pretty excited about the way the year is going to go.


Julio Mitchel

I love the work of Julio Mitchel, your next exhibition at the gallery. What drew you to this artist?

Julio also approached me about a couple of potential book projects. While I still have something to learn about projects and their potential crossover, I was immediately struck by a few of Julio's different projects as well as his earlier books. His work is so very well seen and amazingly printed. A couple of months ago, I spent a couple of days with Julio looking at an incredible amount of work and decided that, while I am researching the markets to see if I can effectively produce and distribute quality books for the projects he will eventually publish, I would be excited to share his work through the gallery.


Julio Mitchel

Are you still teaching, or does the Candela empire take up most of your energies?

I am still teaching actually. I am teaching adjunct, a traditional darkroom class at VIrginia Commonwealth University.


Colonic, Richmond, VA

April 6th marks the deadline for the Unbound Collection. Can you tell us about this call for entry and your ideas behind it?

The idea stems from having only a limited number of open slots in the gallery schedule. I really wanted one show that would allow more photographers a chance to connect with Candela in some way and the rest of the shows in a given year will generally be solo shows or book related. I feel that most mid career photographers have done their share of juried shows and I wanted something that would be open in concept but that would also be worth doing for the photographers. No fees because I hope to raise money through a special event. Then the money from that event will be used to purchase work from the show. The idea is a little uncharted for me but the response has been great so far. And now to put together an event that will bring in a great crowd at a decent ticket price. Ideas we are entertaining include... Door prizes, gift wrapped crap, drunken clowns, PBR, live music... I also enjoy putting together a good night every now and then.


Another Pro Choice Welder, Richmond, VA

Are you up to anything new with your own work?

My own work has slowed down a bit. But I continue to work on the Mangini Series with Terry Brown and I am shooting randomly and getting into the darkroom some. I do have an idea for a 'project' that hasn't yet been started and I have a semi-ambitious show idea coming in 2013 that should also keep me going.


Green Tuft, a collaboration with Terry Brown


Beehive, a collaboration with Terry Brown


Combover, a collaboration with Terry Brown


Long & Straight, a collaboration with Terry Brown

And finally, what would be your perfect day?

Um... er... Some family time, a few hours in the darkroom, music, bourbon, humor, maybe a little bowling?


Feet, Toronto, Canada

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Marc Shoul

Brakpan

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Brakpan is a small town that lies on the East Rand of Gauteng, sandwiched between Boksburg, Benoni and Springs. A once-prosperous mining community, today there are pawnshops, roadhouses, mechanics, mini casinos and other day-to-day shops lining the two main roads that slice through the town. Brakpan is like going back in time; so many aspects of the town remind me of old images I have seen of South Africa. Despite all the changes in nearby Johannesburg, Brakpan still goes about its business in much the same way it did before.  There is a lack of modern development. You don’t see Tuscan townhouse complexes or buildings with glass facades. It’s all very simple and straight forward – almost transparent, and this transparency can be seen in the people too. You won’t find any airs or graces, no fancy cappuccino shops, sushi cafes or organic goods in Brakpan.

The town does not seem to have benefited from its gold rush glory days, which spanned between 1911 until the mid 1950’s, and it now has very little to show for its’ past. Today, the once flourishing mining town only pulls out a small portion of gold compared to what it used to generate, and some disused gold mines now only sell rubble.

A second factor that has contributed to Brakpan’s sense of preservation is the development of Carnival Mall and Casino, which conveniently lies just off the highway a few kilometers away from Brakpan Central. All the major chains and retail shops have moved to the mall and, as a result, the town centre has been left untouched and undeveloped, stunting it economically and leaving its inhabitants with little opportunities.

And yet there are many faces to modern Brakpan. Young girls push prams while karaoke competition winners don’t get their promised prizes. Pirated DVD’s get sold on the streets, crippling the nearby video shops that rent out older movies. There is a sense of nostalgia that remains and is reflected in the buildings and in the people. This is a place where you can still enjoy school and church fete’s, rugby matches, old bars, sokkie jols, biker rallies, fishing and braaiing at the Brakpan Dam; all of which are a part of the local’s lives.

Here there is a peacefulness and relaxed country town feel, without the stress about what tomorrow may bring.  The people of Brakpan live in the now but are still bound by the constraints of the past.

The images presented here are printed on Multigrade V1 FB Fibre matt photographic paper. Exhibition prints are 40cm by 40cm in size in an edition of 10.

Bio

Marc Shoul lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa. He was born in 1975 in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, South Africa and graduated (with honors in photography) from the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in 1999. Since then, he has had several exhibitions of his work including group shows at the Arts Association of Bellville, Fusion (1999), Artscape, Mental Health, (2001) Cape Town, Month of Photography, Detour, (2002), Cape Town, Photo ZA, Obsess (2004) and Resolution Gallery, Faces (2008) in Johannesburg as well as at the World Health Organization TB exhibition in India (2004). Solo exhibitions of ‘Beyond Walmer’ were held by the Association of Visual Arts Gallery in Cape Town (2000) and Natal Society of Arts, Durban (2001).  “Flatlands” a solo exhibition was also held at the Association of Visual Arts in Cape Town (2009) with help from the National Arts Council. Shoul was also featured in the AGFA Youth International Photojournalism Publication 1999. He also reached the finals of the Absa L’Atelier 2009.  Flatlands showed at KZNSA in Durban, South Africa and Galerie Quai 1 in Vevey, Switzerland in 2010. Shoul was invited to hold a workshop at the Vevey School of Photography on the 2010. Shoul was also been included in After A at the Report Atri Festival, Italy, June 2010 curated by Federica Angelucci. Beyond Walmer is on show at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum June-August 2010. Brakpan (work in progress),Shoul has also been included in the Bonaini Africa 2010 Festival of Photography, Cape Town Castle of Good Hope and Museum Africa, Johannesburg. Brakpan (work in progress) was included in 10 a group exhibition at the PhotoMarket Workshop, Johannesburg, 2010. Brakpan in 2011 won the 1st prize at the Winephoto.

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum added “Beyond Walmer” to its permanent collection (2007).

For the last ten years, Marc has worked for various local and international magazines such as Time, Colors, Wired, Blueprint, Dazed and Confused, Design Indaba, World Health Organization, Mother Jones, Stern, Gala, De Spiegel, Financial Times Magazine, Monocle, Smithsonian and The Telegraph Magazine, He has also shot for many advertising clients and agencies.

He has recently completed a project named ‘Flatlands’ in the Johannesburg inner city.  He is now working on a new body of work in Brakpan on the East Rand where he is exploring the city’s way of life and its people.

He is interested in exploring theams of social relevance and changes within his country and further a field.

Shoul works largely in black and white, using a medium format film camera and natural light printed on Fiber photographic paper.

 

Related links

Marc Shoul

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Apologies for no updates in nearly three weeks…just been busy with own work… But here we go again. Loads to share…

Features and Essays

Brilliant…Full edit of Gene Smith’s classic ‘Country Doctor’ online for the first time on LIFE.com….

Eugene Smith: Country Doctor (Life.com)

Finally received the first issue of my annual National Geographic Magazine subscription..Bought annual deal in NatGeo’s Regent Street store in London in August…Found out in December my activation hadn’t gone through, and then told should start receiving issues from January….Got on my nerves…Five months wait… oh well… Glad to finally being able to enjoy print issues on regular basis…From the February 2012 issue….

Amy Toensing: Papua New Guinea’s Cave People (NGM)

Gerd Ludwig: Astana, Kazakhstan (NGM)

This week’s Time International cover story…Christopher Morris has been back to the White House…

Christopher Morris: Inside Barack Obama’s World (Lightbox)

Republican primaries…

Two series by Charles Ommanney for Newsweek…

Charles Ommanney: South Carolina Trail (Newsweek)

Charles Ommanney: The Granite State Weighs In (Newsweek)

Chris Morris from New Hampshire for TIME…

Christopher Morris: New Hampshire Primary (Lightbox)

Brooks Kraft: Running Romney (Photo Booth)

Mark Makela: How to Run for President (zReportage)

One year since the Egypt revolution…Ed Ou video and slideshow on NYT

Ed Ou and Ben Solomon: Reflections on an Unfinished Revolution (NYT) video

Ed Ou: Youth in Egypt (NYT Lens)

Ed Ou: The Ongoing Revolution (Photographer’s website)

Denix Dailleux: Egyptian Artists (Newsweek)

Nice series by Adam Dean…

Adam Dean: Kachin Come Under Siege in Myanmar (NYT)

Erika Larsen’s beautiful Sami work on NYT Lens…

Erika Larsen: Sami People (NYT Lens)

Alejandro Chaskielberg:  Horn of Africa (BBC)

Eunice Adorno: The Flower Girls: Mennonites in Mexico (Lightbox)

Ed Kashi: Turkey (VII)

Nikos Economopoulos: India in Colour (Magnum)

Ron Haviv: The Devastating Costs of the Amazon Gold Rush (Smithsonian)

Glenna Gordon: Living with the Past in Liberia (Lightbox)

Greg Girard: Lifestyle on U.S. Military Bases (NYT Lens)

Rina Castelnuovo: In Israel, a Clash Between the Secular and Ultra-Orthodox  (NYT)

Steve Shelton: Sudan’s Secession Crisis (zReportage)

Richard Tsong Taatarii: Baby Buddha (zReportage)

Mimi Chakarova: Sold for Sex in Eastern Europe (CNN Photo blog)

Luigi Baldelli: Afghanistan (Corriere.it)

Leon Borensztein: American Portraits (Lightbox)

Sean Gallagher: The Smog That Ate Beijing (Foreign Policy)

Louise Serpa: Sweetheart of the Rodeo (NYT Lens)

Brian Cassey: Hong Kong’s Poor Living in Cages (CNN Photo blog)

Leonard Freed: Behind New York City’s ‘Police Work’ (Lightbox)

Jeff Harris: 4,748 Self-Portraits and Counting (Lightbox)

Giuliano Camarda: Jahalin Bedouins in East Jerusalem (Photographer’s website)

Åsa Sjöström: Turkana Draught (Moment Agency)

Ragnar Axelsson: Greenland (Polka)

Joel Sternfeld:  First Pictures (Photo Booth)

Kalpesh Lathigra: From the Film Set of ‘Coriolanus’ (Photobooth)

Jessica Ingram: Following the Trail of Civil Rights (NYT Lens)

Joseph Szabo: Coming of Age in America (Lightbox)

Davide Monteleone: Red Thistle (VII)

NPR photographer David Gilkey has been discovering Russia by rail…

David Gilkey: Russia By Rail (NPR)

Larry Racioppo: New York Housing Pictures (NYT Lens)

Peter Mcdiarmid: Year in Pictures 2011 (Photographer’s Vimeo)

Kieran Dodds: The Scottish Highland Games (The Atlantic)

Lee Jeffries: Homeless (Guardian)

Interviews

Chris Johns, Editor, National Geographic Magazine (burn Magazine)

Patti Smith (BBC)

Steve McCurry on fall of Kodak (BBC)

Alejandro Chaskielberg (BBC)

Adam Dean (Digital Photo Pro)

Luca Sage (Sojournposse)

Guy Martin (BBC) Starts at around 17 mins.

Toni Greaves : Radical Love, The Promise (BJP)

Jason Larkin : Cairo Divided (BJP)

Joel Sartore (NPR)

Heidi Levine on working in Libya (laurenmwolfe.com)

Chris Floyd (Hungry Eye Mag Vimeo)

Maggie Steber (NPR)

Ron Haviv (TV4.se)

Jim Wilson (NYT Lens)

Umit Bektas, Reuters photographer ,  reflects on the essence of war (MSNBC)

Rineke Dijkstra (PDN)

Shelby Lee Adams : An Ode to Appalachia (PDN)

Christopher Manson (NYT Lens)

Errol Morris : ‘We’ve forgotten that photographs are connected to the physical world’ (Guardian)

Sebastian Liste (GUP Magazine)

John McDermott (PDN)

Antonio Faccilongo (KL Photoawards)

Sean Gallagher (Asiasociety.org)

Articles

photo: William Eggleston

Guardian: The Month in Photography |The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Pieter Hugo, Eve Arnold, William Eggleston, Don McCullin and Annie Leibovitz|

photo: Simon Roberts

FT: A New Beginning(FT Magazine) | “After the disasters of the past year, we asked photographers to look at the people and places putting themselves back together again in 2012″ |Toshiki Senoue,  Davide Monteleone, John Davies, Jim Dow, Antoine Doyen,  Massimo Vitali, Simon Roberts, Laura Pannack,  Michael Collins, and Marcus Bleasdale

NYT: Blame Photoshop, Not Diabetes, for This Amputation

Radu Sigheti: The Problem with Prizes (Reuters photo blog)

BBC News: Syria unrest: French journalist Gilles Jacquier killed

World Press Photo: Preparing for Judging

David Burnett: Talent Added: Photojournalism

Ed Kashi: 3 Qualities of a photojournalist

Little Brown Mushroom blog: On Marrying a Photographer

AP: AP opens full news bureau in North Korea

Guardian: Why newspapers are closing the shutters on staff photographers

Guardian: Is photography the most influential medium for environmental awareness?

Guardian: Decisive moment? Smartphones steal focus from point-and-shoot cameras

Congratulations to Danfung Dennis for being nominated for an Oscar for Hell and Back Again…

Oscar.go.com: Documentary Feature Nominee: Hell and Back Again

Aidan Sullivan to Replace David Friend as World Press Photo Jury Chair (Reportage Tumblr)

Wayne Ford: The Suffering of Light: Thirty Years of Photographs’ by Magnum Photographer Alex Webb

David Gonzalez: Life — and Kodak — Remembered (NYT Lens)

Ben Roberts: Exposure Don’t Buy You Shit! (Photographer’s blog)

Poynter: Washington Post raises eyebrows, questions with ‘composite’ photo on front page

NYT Lens: The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League

NYT Lens: William Gedney’s View of Myrtle Avenue

NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Eve Arnold 

Sean O’Hagan writes on Eve Arnold’s touching photograph of a bar girl in Havana…

Guardian: The big picture: Bar Girl in a Brothel in the Red Light District, Havana, 1954

Guardian: Happy birthday, Firecracker: the site for female photographers | In an industry still dominated by men, Firecracker promotes and supports women working in photography

NYT: After an Arrest, Civil Rights Questions

CNN: CNN Digital Names Simon Barnett As Photography Director 

Guardian: Leo Maguire’s Best Shot

BJP: Christopher Anderson signs with New York Magazine

BJP: AFP v. Morel: Both parties moving for summary judgment

BJP: Photographer Lauren Greenfield sued for defamation

BJP: How are the Tate, V&A and National Media Museum investing in photography?

BJP: London Underground apologises for DSLR ban blunder

photo: Chris Hondros

Foreign Policy: Photos that mattered in 2011

NYT Mag 6th floor blog: Entering Weegee’s World

DuckRabbit: Cameras, communication and the intimacy of a moment.

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.25: Iran as perpetual enemy

Miniature helicopter in new use…

NGM: Field Test: Serengeti Lions

Comments on crowdfunding…

Joerg Colberg: Crowdfunding is not a cash cow (Conscientious)

Pete Brook: The Etiquette of Crowdfunding (Prison Photography)

Verve: Birthe Piontek

Verve: Kevin Kunishi

Verve: Dimitri Stefanov

Verve: Tomasz Lazar

How to make a Magnum in Motion-style essay

7 Tips for HD Color Correction and DSLR Color Correction

A Few Thoughts on Filenames…

multiMedia

photo: Joachim Ladefoged

Once Magazine Issue 4 is for sale in the App store

The cover story is by Joachim Ladefoged… If you don’t have an iPad and thus no access to Once Magazine, you can view Ladefoged’s terrific 2003 Newfoundland series on his agency VII’s website here.

British Journal of Photography – iPad App

Crowd funding

‘McCullin’ – Feature Documentary (indiegogo)

Exhibitions

The Last Days of Mubarak : Photos by Guy Martin and Ivor Prickett : Host Gallery : London : 9 February – 10 March 2012

Peter diCampo: Life Without Lights : 6 -12 February 2012 11am – 6pm at The Strand Gallery : London

Nobel Peace Center to present Hetherington, Addario exhibition

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Leica Oskar Barnack Award

Center International Awards

Lumix Festival for Young Photojournalism 

Renaissaince Photography Prize Calling for Entries

Hillmann Prize nominations

Photobook Dummy Award 2012

Useful site for grants and awards etc. …The Curator Ship

PDN Photo Annual : Deadline: 25 January

Hasselblad’s Masters Award winners announced

Events

UK Premiere: Under Fire: Journalists in Combat, February  8 :  7pm :  Frontline club : London

Sneak preview of the above on YouTube here

powerHouse Portfolio Review : NYC

PhotoFest : Mexico

Agencies

Magnum Photos January 2012 Newsletter

VII Photo Newsletter January 2012

BJP: VII Photo appoints new director of business development

Jobs

UPI : senior staff photographer in LA

Summer internship on NPR’s Social Media Desk

Photographers

Simon Roberts has updated his website….

Simon Roberts

Kalpesh Lathigra

Fritz Hoffman

Monique Jaques

Giuliano Camarda

Jonathan May

Rhea Karam

Equipment

CPN: Gary Knight introduces the new Canon G1X

BJP: Fujifilm goes back to its professional roots, releases the X-Pro 1

To finish off… Fotoshop by Adobe

and Texting While Walking

and This is Brighton

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Features and Essays

Some interesting features from the upcoming National Geographic Magazine’s December issue…

David Guttenfelder: Japan’s Nuclear Refugees (NGM)

photo: Chia Ming Chien

Various photographers: The City Solution (NGM)

Jim Richardson: King James Bible (NGM)

A lot of people raving about this last week online…

Seamus Murphy: A Darkness Visible | Afghanistan (MediaStorm)

Beautiful photos by Getty’s Daniel Berehulak from the Sonepur Mela fair in India…

Daniel Berehulak: The Sonepur Mela (TIME) India

This week’s TIME US edition cover story…

Peter van Agtmael: An Army Apart (Lightbox)

I wished I had received the  US edition as opposed to Time Europe with Platon’s smirking Berlusconi…

Noticed van Agtmael’s cover is a crop of one of the frames seen in the Ligthbox slideshow…

Magnum photographers: Paris in Winter (Newsweek)

Adam Dean has the cover of Newsweek International this week with a portrait of Ai Weiwei…slideshow on the magazine’s website…

Adam Dean : Ai Weiwei (Newsweek)

Nicolas Righetti: Syria: Posters of Bashar al-Assad (Newsweek)

Ed Ou: Syrian Refugees in Turkey (NYT)

Ed Ou: Somali-Kenyan Border (Polka) multimedia

Andrea Bruce: Leaving Camp Victory in Baghdad (NYT)

Definitely worth checking out…This year’s Joop Swart Masterclass participants’ projects…

2011 Joop Swart Masterclass galleries (World Press Photo)

Sanjit Das: The End of Splendid Isolation? (Panos) Bhutan

Ivor Prickett:  Free Libya (Panos)

Zed Nelson: South Sudan (Guardian)

From VII…

Adam Ferguson: Looking Home, At War (VII) Same in VII Magazine

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: The Family (VII)

Ed Kashi: America’s Uninsured (VII)

Ed Kashi: Ze Peixe: A Life at Sea VII)

Sim Chi Yin: China’s Rat Tribe (VII)

Donna Ferrato: Domestic Abuse (NYT Lens) Ferrato’s website

Alessandra Sanguinetti: The Sixth Day (Photo Booth)

Peter Hapak: The Art of War: Honoring the Fallen for a Lifetime (Lightbox) Hapak’s website

Chantal Heijnen: Bronxites (NYT Lens)  Heijnen’s website

August Bradley: Portraits of 99 from Occupy Wall Street (NYT Lens) Bradley’s project’s website

Brian David Steven:  War veterans (BBC)

Adam Amengual: Leaving the Life: Portraits of Former Gang Members (Lightbox)

Fredrik Naumann: Return to Utøya (Panos)

Mario Tama: Nascar (CNN photo blog)

Jesse Burke: Deer Stands (Lightbox)

Tiana Markova-Gold: Prostitution in Morocco (Lightbox) Markova-Gold’s website

Martina Bagicalupo: One woman’s story of surviving 20 years of conflict in Uganda (MSNBC)

Paolo Woods: The Land of Prophets (Institute)

Shelby Lee Adams: Of Kentucky (NYT)

Danny Wilcox Frazier: South Dakota’s Badlands (MSNBC)

Matt Eich: Hunting Alligators in Louisiana (MSNBC)

Abbas: Kolkata (Magnum)

Greg Brown: Aerial Photos of Ground Zero (NYT Lens)

Kim Badawi: Gaza Stripper (Stern) You can see the full set at Reportage site

Patrick Farrell: Haitian Black Gold (ZReportage)

Narciso Contreras: Little Burma (ZReportage)

Ali Arkady: The Day Labourers in Northern Iraq (Foto8)

Wendy Marijnissen: Because I’m a Girl : Rape in Pakistan (Photographer’s Vimeo)

Misha Friedman: An Invisible Epidemic (PDN Photo of the Day)

Interviews and Talks

Christopher Anderson at the 2011 World Press Photo Masterclass (World Press Photo)

Sebastiao Salgado (CPN)

David Guttenfelder : Outside the Frame: Rare chance to see inside Fukushima (MSNBC)  Related by Guttenfelder: Inside Fukushima (Guardian) | AP photographer Guttenfelder’s website

Don McCullin on Social Documentary Photography (Vimeo)

Ben Lowy (Photo Booth)

Ed Kashi : What is Photojournalism (Kashi blog)

Andrew Hetherington:  The day I photographed the great Joe Frazier (WTJ?)

Huge congratulations to Antonio Bolfo for becoming fully represented Getty Reportage photographer last week!

Antonio Bolfo : Attending Joop Swart Masterclass (Getty Reportage Tumblr)

Susan Seubert (Youtube)

Martina Bagicalupo (MSNBC)

KC Ortiz (Juxtapoz)

Kate Peters (The SIP)

Tessa Bunney (e-photoreview)

Articles

The month in photography…

photo: George Georgiou

Guardian: The Month in Photography  | The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Josef Koudelka, Diane Arbus, Bruce Davidson, Helmut Newton, Terry Richardson and Walker Evans.

photo: Chris Hondros

Peter Beaumont: Reporting Libya: freelance coverage, full-time dangers (Guardian)

Clare Morgana Gillis: What I Lost in Libya (The Atlantic)

The Atlantic:  ’Under Fire’: a new documentary shows that war is hell for journalists

David Campbell: The elusive enemy: Looking back at the “war on terror’s” visual culture

BagNewsNotes: Tents: The Overarching Symbol of Occupy (BNN)

The Atlantic: CNN Photojournalists Lose Jobs to Cheaper, Better Cameras

photo: William Eggleston

Guardian: Paris Photo 2011 – in pictures

Lightbox: Paris Photo 2011 Spotlights Sub-Saharan Africa

BJP: New festival to offer grants to photographers

WSJ: How an Image Becomes an Icon

Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize winner annouced and exhibition opened….

BJP: Taylor Wessing winner

photo: Jooney Woodward

Guardian: Taylor Wessing portrait prize: another animal, another girl with red hair | Was Jooney Woodward’s shot of a red-head holding a guinea pig really the best of the 6,000 entries? And what makes her think it’s an ‘unsettling’ work

Evening Standard: Taylor Wessing exhibition review

photos: Pete Marlow

Telegraph: Magnum Contact Sheets book reviewed

BBC: Magnum Contact Sheets

Lightbox: The Singular Approach: Chien-Chi Chang’s Contact Sheet Chronicle

BBC: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II sets photo record

PDN: Gursky’s Print Goes for $4.5 Million, Observers Say: Huh?   | Related: Nick Turpin blog: Value Added?

Joerg Colberg: How much are photographs worth?

PDN: Ad Banned in UK for Showing Super Skinny Model

Guardian: Photographer David Trood’s Best Shot 

Verve: Corentin Fohlen

Verve: Beth Yarnelle Edwards 

BJP: The alleged murderer of photojournalist Trent Keegan has been acquitted because of a lack of evidence

Chicago Tribune: iPad Apps for Photojournalists – Tuesday Tips

multiMedia, Apps, and Publications


Foto8 back issues on Issuu

The Condition One App : Features in NYT Lens | Lightbox | BJP

Jason Larkin has transformed his project Cairo Divided into a free 32 page newsprint publication…I picked up a copy from Jason himself last week at the World Press Photo exhibition opening here in London…do go order one…

Cairo Divided : Project website

Between Land : Project website

Awards, Grants, Competitions, and Exhibition opportunities

Magenta Flash Forward 2012 submissions open

The Street Photography Awards 2012

International Festival of Photojournalism calling for entries

Brad Vest Named College Photographer Of The Year (NPPA)

Wine Photo winners

PhotoPhilanthropy – Student Grant Round 5 

An opportunity for young Asian photographers…

Scholarship for Diploma in Photojournalism run by the Konrad Adenauer Asian Center for Journalism at the Ateneo de Manila University (ACFJ) : The deadline is on Friday, 10 February 2012.

One Shot: The City – Intl Photo Awards

Crowdfunding, Initiatives, and Causes

Fancy Alec Soth taking your portrait? You do need deep pockets, mind…

eBay - An opportunity to purchase a portrait session with Alec Soth : Proceeds go to a charitable cause

PhotoVoice Auction 2011 Preview Exhibition  : A preview exhibition of prints in the PhotoVoice Auction of Exceptional Photographs 2011  : Monday 14th – Friday 18th Nov :  11am-6pm, late night Thursday to 7.30pm  Venue: La Galleria Pall Mall, 30 Royal Opera Arcade, London, SW1Y 4UY v

Events and Exhibitions

A Photo says 1000 Words? The Ethics of Photojournalism : 23 November 2011 : Southbank Centre : London

BJP  Vision11 

A Desperate Journey by Antonio Olmos : Jersey Arts Centre : Mon 14 Nov 2011 to Sat 26 Nov 2011 | more info

Workshops and Education

Foundry Photojournalism Workshop 2012 : Thailand : July 29 – August 4 :  Info: Eric Beecroft, the co-founder of the Foundry Photojournalism Workshops, has just announced that it was ready to accept early registrations ($100 deposit, non refundable, and deducted from the total tuition amount) until January 15, 2012. Early registration guarantees a spot and precedence in the choice of instructor.  The 2012 Foundry Photojournalism Workshop will be held in North Thailand from July 29- August 4, 2012.   For regional students (South Asia– India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Tibet and South East Asia-Thailand, Burma, Vietnam, Phillippines, Laos, Cambodia,Indonesia, Malaysia) the tuition is $475. For all others it is $975 US dollars. Payment is via Paypal.

MA program in Photojournalism at the Mid-Sweden University : Starts 2012

Agencies and Collectives

Panos newsletter

NOOR newsletter

TerraProject newsletter

Photographers

Christina Fallara

Eric Michael Johnson

To finish off… This week’s stunning video… earth seen from above

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