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STEPHEN SHAMES

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Agencies

David Cambell: Photo agencies and ethics: the individual and the collective 

Magnum Photos have a new website, which I personally found to be, sadly, anything but an improvement…slow, confusing, and most annoyingly all the old links don’t seem to work anymore…

Magnum Photos

Institute have relaunched their website too..

Institute

After Corbis pulls out of Visa Pour l’Image, director asks, ‘Where are all the photo agencies? (BJP)

VII Photo : July newsletter

VII Photo : June newsletter

Magnum Photos : newsletter

NOOR : June newsletter

Panos Pictures : July Newsletter

Magnum Photos adds new members (BJP)

Reportage by Getty Images : Sebastian Liste and Toby Smith join core roster : Jerome Sessi leaves Reportage

Alejandro Chaskielberg joins DMB Media

Prime Collective : June newsletter

Terra Project

John Parkinson Agency

Luz Photo

Photographers

New Magnum nominees’ websites

Photo © Jerome Sessini

Jerome Sessini

Bieke Depoorter

Zoe Strauss

I rarely used to be too interested in portraiture, but recently I’ve found myself looking at portrait photography quite a bit.  Brigitte Lacombe is one of them. She’s a photographer, whose work I often see in Newsweek (The Martin Amis photo seen below was printed in last week’s issue). I didn’t know anything about her though. Only having visited Lacombe’s website did I realise that she is in fact somebody who has been around for a long long time. Live and learn…

Martin Amis, Brooklyn, NY, 2012
Photo © Brigitte Lacombe

Brigitte Lacombe

Director Benh Zeitlin shot at Coney Island, New York.
Photo © Steve Schofield

Steve Schofield : website : blog

Jason Bell 

Rick Pushinsky :  website : blog

Ed Kashi : Photojournalisms for iPad

Juan Sierra

James Morgan

Two great Iranian photographers…

Photo © Newsha Tavakolian

Newsha Tavakolian 

Photo © Kiana Hayeri

Kiana Hayeri

Carlos Moreno

Photo © John Vink

John Vink : Quest for Land App

Stephen Shames: Bronx Boys for iPad

Pete Pin

Andrew Hinderaker

Nick Cobbing relaunched his website some time ago…

Photo © Nick Cobbing

Nick Cobbing

Some photographers’ sites, most of which I’ve recently visited for the first time…

Paul S. Amundsen

Marko Drobnjakovic

Irina Ruppert

Maxim Dondyuk

Andrew Querner

Chloe Borkett

Isadora Kosofsky

Alexi Hobbs

Tanya Habjouqa

Ian C. Bates

Julian Wainwright

Sophia Evans

Wyatt Erskine

Eduardo de Francisco

Marco Kesseler

Ross Mantle

Alex Pavlou

Norma Manly

Alex Potter

Theodore Kaye

Clint McLean

Nikos Pilos

Ricardo Garcia Vilanova

Jiri Makovec

Djamila Grossman

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Photographer Stephen Shames began his project shooting on East Tremont Ave in the Bronx while on assignment for Look Magazine in 1977. The magazine went under while Shames was on assignment, but he continued with the project for two decades, sometimes staying on the block for weeks, sometimes visiting only once or twice a year. Accompanying the photographs is the riveting story of Bronx born Martin Dones, who Shames follows from childhood to manhood. Dones is an exception, a young man who manages to escape a violent life to successfully raise his own family. Dones offers his earliest memories of his life in the Bronx:

“My first memory is still as clear as a picture: my cousin being murdered. I didn’t actually see him being murdered but I heard the thud of his body hitting the pavement. That death sound is the first thing I remember. Thud. I jump awake, startled and everybody is screaming. Years later I learn he was murdered because his brother robbed this gangs’ little nightclub. Since they couldn’t get the brother, they got him. He’s tossed off the roof. His body has to clear a fence. They swing him so his body arks up and out, like a diver, before gravity carries it down to the schoolyard. The cops never caught them. The 135th Street Boys of the South Bronx did it, but we never found out for sure which ones. People said, “It was maybe him, maybe not, maybe this one, maybe not.” The crazy thing is they all died eventually, one by one. Right after my cousin was thrown from the roof, other cousins torch my building. We escape as the third floor explodes and falls on the lower floors. The building whimpers, and then collapses. I stand in the cold and watch all of our stuff fly away. I’m sad. I got a new monorail track that morning for Christmas.

My mother’s boyfriend is an alcoholic. They drink, party, talk and sing Spanish songs. Pretty much, they just drink and argue. And me, at age four, I just want to escape from the noise. I open the front door and walk out. Nobody even knows I’m gone. That’s how drunk they are. I walk up, past the fourth, the fifth floor, up to the roof. Well, not the roof, because the door is locked. I go to the last step. Crunch into a little ball, lay down and try to sleep.

Another time, my mother pours lighter fluid on her boyfriend then torches the bed. My brothers and I try to put it out. He barely escapes with his life. One day my mom finds hickies on my sister’s neck and chest. So my mother beats her up and then calls her father. He arrives from Spanish Harlem, takes an extension cord and wraps it up around his hand. I hear my sister screaming. He gives her marks all over her body. Shortly after that, he was shot six times in the hallway by his sister.”

The electronic book Bronx Boys is available from FotoEvidence Press. The Ebook Bronx Boys has the look and feel of a physical book– the high-resolution images that can be viewed full screen, with a feature allows the viewer to zoom into details without loss of image quality. Most of the photographs in Bronx Boys are published by FotoEvidence Press for the first time.


Martin Dones


Clubhouse, circa 1980


Hanging out


Ralph jumps, 1977


Martin Dones, flirting


Hot summer night


Hanging out


Ponch with girlfriend


After breaking into the pool, hot summer night

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The Spectre of Theater

By Tricia Lawless Murray

Masochism is itself an aesthetic formation. The only place where its contradictions and impossibilities can be reconciled is that specific zone that modern aesthetic philosophy, from Kant to Lyotard, has identified as the sublime, that unique and illogical experience that carries with it both pleasure and pain.
—Nick Mansfield

Victor Cobo

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Prostitute at angle of Rue de la Reynie and Rue Quincampoix, 1933

Brassai with Tony Ray-Jones, Creative Camera, April, 1970

Tony Ray-Jones: How did you start your life?

Brassai: I was born in Transylvania in 1899. My father was a teacher of French literature. He lived in Paris and loved it and studied at the Sorbonne. When I was five my father brought me and my family to Paris for a year. I

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From Kids, Larry Clark

The Matter with Kids Today: Kids and Raised by Wolves

By Eric Margolis, Humanity & Society, Volume 20, Number 2, May 1996

You have seen their faces. In the core of every American city young kids wander the streets getting stoned, spare changing, fighting, scratching, and hanging out. They wear tribal badges: tattoos, camo clothes and skin heads,skateboards and phat pants

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Untitled (man with arms around two women), 1950-60'sLee Balterman's ChicagoBy Paul Berlanga, Director, Stephen Daiter GalleryLee Balterman has romanced the city of Chicago with his camera for six decades and shows no sign of falling out of love. A couple of weeks ago I mentioned to Lee that my partner and I had managed to grab a last lunch at the legendary Berghoff restaurant without standing

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