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Midnight City, Majesco's indie publishing arm, is bringing racer Krautscape and brawler Double Dragon: Neon to Steam as well as Slender: The Arrival to consoles, the company announced today.

Krautscape and Double Dragon: Neon will be available for Windows PC while Slender: The Arrival will be published for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 through the Xbox Games Store and PlayStation Network. All three titles will cost $9.99 each and are slated to launch in the first quarter of this year.

Mario von Rickenbach's Krautscape is racing title in which players drive along tracks to collect points and take to the air to avoid obstacles. Each track is generated by the vehicle in the first place, building itself out as players drive so no two tracks are alike. The game also features a number of different modes, including a speed challenge mode.

Double Dragon: Neon is a reboot of the original 1987 classic side-scrolling beat em up. For the Windows PC version of the title, developer Abstraction has added a new online co-op mode that allows players to share health and power as well as revive each other.

The console versions of Slender: The Arrival will also include new content. Blue Isle Studios created two new levels that will "delve deeper into the lives of those Slender Man has touched." These new levels will tell the story of Slender Man's victims through flashbacks, putting players in their terrified shoes. Blue Isle also plans to release these two new levels as a free update for the PC version after their console launch.

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Sam Byford

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When Sony unveiled the PlayStation 4 two months ago, many were impressed to see Mark Cerny fronting the presentation as lead system architect; the industry veteran first made his name by designing the classic Marble Madness at the age of 18, and has since been described as "the closest we have come to a modern-day da Vinci." Cerny hasn't spoken much about the PS4 since, but now a lengthy, in-depth interview with Gamasutra does a lot to explain the thinking behind the system's design.

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In Hackers, the 1995 cult teen cyber thriller, a young Angelina Jolie and an American-accented Jonny Lee Miller play WipEout in a club. Established hacker Angelina is pretty good at the game, and has the top score. But then upstart hacker genius Jonny smashes it to bits. They hate each other. They love each other.

At the end of the movie Angelina and Jonny fall into a swimming pool and, finally, kiss, as Squeeze's little-known love song Heaven Knows lifts the camera up into the air. A year later, in 1996, the pair married. By then, WipEout, the racer that evolved from that pre-rendered demo Angelina and Jonny pretended to play on the big screen, was the most exciting video game in the world.

Improbably, a dozen or so people from a north west England developer called Psygnosis had conspired to stomp on Mario's head and speed past silly Sonic onto the cover of style magazines. WipEout steered into the slipstream of a dance music-fuelled drug culture, leaving its racer rivals in its wake. Forget beeps and boops - WipEout on PlayStation had heavy beats. WipEout was for grown ups. WipEout was cool.

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24 Caret Games' reverse rhythm-shooter Retro/Grade is coming to Steam on March 20th, offering up exclusive support for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, and Wii guitar controllers.

The port otherwise boasts all of the features that made the original PS3 release such a standout, including a broad selection of challenge levels and difficulty settings that range from "doable" to "ridiculously challenging." Seriously, don't underestimate the hardest difficulty setting. It will humble you.

It's worth noting that the PS3 version of Retro/Grade is currently on sale for $3.49, or $2.44 if you're a PlayStation Plus member. It's definitely worth the cash -- I really enjoyed the time I spent with the game, and it easily ranked among my favorite PlayStation Network releases of last year.

[via Joystiq]

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Joseph Dumary

Next-gen TV—with a 4K "Ultra HD" picture resolution—was this year's hot topic at CES. But its success may be in the hands of console gamers.

With leaked details of octal-core processor banks paired with 8GB of RAM, the PlayStation 4 "Orbis" is sounding powerful (just for comparison of RAM alone, the 8GB of system memory is roughly 32 times more than the current model). But to see where 4K comes in, it's worth taking a trip back seven years.

In 2005, very few people had an HDTV. According to one study, there were "as many" as 10 million homes with high-definition screens—globally. The problem, according to many commentators, was the lack of HD content: nobody wanted to buy an HDTV because there was little HD content; very little HD content was made because there were very few people to sell it to. Classic catch-22.

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Ni No Kuni

Hayao Miyazaki, renowned director and co-founder of Japanese animation powerhouse Studio Ghibli, doesn't like video games. He once tried to play a PC version of the Japanese board game Shogi but it wasn't for him. "The PC checks all approaches," he said in an interview. "That's not fair." But despite his lack of fondness for the medium, Miyazaki’s studio teamed up with developer Level 5 to bring Ghibli’s incomparable style to the world of gaming. Released on the PlayStation 3 in Japan back in 2011, Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch finally made its way to an English-speaking audience this week. It combines two of the country's greatest exports — it's an epic role playing experience with the look and feel of a high quality...

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The Swapper's a cold, strange game. As it starts, low key lighting sets the mood in a series of deliberately-paced rotational shots: a small planet orbits an incandescent star; a space station orbits overhead, bathed in a melancholy blue; an escape pod launches, fleeing dangers unknown. The whole scene only lasts a minute and a half from fade-in to lunar landing, but the languid pace hearkens to the internalized mode of sci-fi films like Moon or Solaris, brooding and mesmerisingly obscure.

The ambient tone reflects The Swapper's atmosphere, cobbled together from a textured mash of real-life assets (the two-man team have created a uniquely constructional aesthetic using photographs of real world objects to get around the hassle of creating original art) and the game's primary mechanic, or rather its ethical implications.

The eponymous swapper is a cloning gun that lets you transfer your consciousness from one body to another. Rather than treating this as simply a means to a gameplay end, the narrative of this puzzle platformer delves into the ramifications that might arise from using such a device.

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Memory of a Broken Dimension has one of the boldest, most unique aesthetics of any game this year. An unsettling hodgepodge of jagged monochromatic lines, radio static, and cold, unsympathetic text puts one in mind of a world comprised of Joy Division album covers skipping through time.

Indie developer Ezra " Xra" Hanson-White demonstrated Memory of a Broken Dimension recently at the Sense of Wonder Night session highlighting experimental game design at Tokyo Games Show. A recent video shows off Xra's demonstration where we're able to gain at least a hazy notion of what the game is (thanks, indiegames.com).

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Prison Architect may look cute but the campaign content is not: build an execution chamber and send a man to his death - a man who's tale of murder and repent will challenge your beliefs and leave a lasting impression.

And that's just chapter one.

"It definitely starts on a dark note," creator Chris Delay told me. "I wanted it to start on a very dark note. I wanted you to feel a real shock of arrival in a different world when you first start playing Prison Architect.

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