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James Gosling is probably best known for creating the Java programming language while working at Sun Microsystems. Currently, he is the chief software architect at Liquid Robotics. Among other projects, Liquid Robotics makes the Wave Glider, an autonomous, environmentally powered marine robot. James has agreed to take a little time from the oceangoing robots and answer any questions you have. As usual, ask as many as you'd like, but please, one question per post.

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Jon Brodkin

Niall Kennedy

Todd Kuehnl has been a developer for nearly 20 years and says he's tried "pretty much every language under the sun."

But it was only recently that Kuehnl discovered Go, a programming language unveiled by Google almost four years ago. Go is still a new kid on the block, but for Kuehnl, the conversion was quick. Now he says "Go is definitely by far my favorite programming language to work in." Kuehnl admitted he is "kind of a fanboy."

I'm no expert in programming, but I talked to Kuehnl because I was curious what might draw experienced coders to switch from proven languages to a brand new one (albeit one co-invented by the famous Ken Thompson, creator of Unix and the B programming language). Google itself runs some of its back-end systems on Go, no surprise for a company that designs its own servers and much of the software (right down to the operating systems) that its employees use. But why would non-Google engineers go with Go?

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Stack Exchange

Stack Exchange

This Q&A is part of a weekly series of posts highlighting common questions encountered by technophiles and answered by users at Stack Exchange, a free, community-powered network of 100+ Q&A sites.

Where have all the user-defined operators gone? tjameson can't "find any procedural languages that support custom operators in the language," he writes. "There are hacks (such as macros in C++), but that's hardly the same as language support." Is there any good reason we can't write our own operators? See the original question here.

Are you experienced?

Karl Bielefeldt answers (94 votes): There are two diametrically opposed schools of thought in programming language design. One is that programmers write better code with fewer restrictions, and the other is that they write better code with more restrictions. In my opinion, the reality is that good experienced programmers flourish with fewer restrictions, but that restrictions can benefit the code quality of beginners. User-defined operators can make for very elegant code in experienced hands, and utterly awful code by a beginner. So whether your language includes them or not depends on your language designer's school of thought. Related: "How are operators saved in memory?"

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Peter Bright

Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock

In a bid to make JavaScript run ever faster, Mozilla has developed asm.js. It's a limited, stripped down subset of JavaScript that the company claims will offer performance that's within a factor of two of native—good enough to use the browser for almost any application. Can JavaScript really start to rival native code performance? We've been taking a closer look.

The quest for faster JavaScript

JavaScript performance became a big deal in 2008. Prior to this, the JavaScript engines found in common Web browsers tended to be pretty slow. These were good enough for the basic scripting that the Web used at the time, but it was largely inadequate for those wanting to use the Web as a rich application platform.

In 2008, however, Google released Chrome with its V8 JavaScript engine. Around the same time, Apple brought out Safari 4 with its Nitro (née Squirrelfish Extreme) engine. These engines brought something new to the world of JavaScript: high performance achieved through just-in-time (JIT) compilation. V8 and Nitro would convert JavaScript into pieces of executable code that the CPU could run directly, improving performance by a factor of three or more.

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Todd Hoff

What data structure is more sacred than the link list? If we get rid of it what silly interview questions would we use instead? But not using linked-lists is exactly what Aater Suleman recommends in Should you ever use Linked-Lists?

In The Secret To 10 Million Concurrent Connections one of the important strategies is not scribbling data all over memory via pointers because following pointers increases cache misses which reduces performance. And there’s nothing more iconic of pointers than the link list.

Here are Aeter's reasons to be anti-linked-list:

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Chris Welch

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In yet another example of computers churning out art, Paul Thompson has built a C++ script that produces snowballs — poems where every line is a single word, with each successive word one letter longer than its predecessor. "I thought that someone must have created a program to generate these, and I was surprised that I couldn’t find one even after some pretty thorough Googling," Thompson writes on his blog. That led the part-time programmer to develop his own solution. Thompson's code scans through a massive text file of numerous combined works from Project Gutenberg. All character names are ignored as the poem is crafted, as are any foreign phrases included in the source material. His formula also relies on Markov chains to build...

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