Skip navigation
Help

New Brunswick

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

This SlideShowPro photo gallery requires the Flash Player plugin and a web browser with JavaScript enabled.

Hover over the image for navigation and full screen controls

Gaston Lacombe

Captive

play this essay

 

In zoos all around the world, visitors go to admire some of the most beautiful, rare or fierce creatures on Earth, but often fail to notice the deplorable habitats in which they are kept.

I have been gathering pictures from zoos all around for the last three years. I like most zoos — I really do. Some zoos need to be congratulated for making great efforts at conserving endangered species, providing shelter to animals who could not otherwise survive and educating the public on ecological issues.

However, even in the best zoos, there are animals that are stuck in cement enclosures too small for their needs, or in rooms where the only vegetation they see are the plants painted on the wall. I’ve seen animals living in cages where they cannot even sit up, or have no access to daylight or clean water. At these moments, I feel guilty for supporting a system that treats animals cruelly, and at these moments, I take pictures.

 

Bio

Gaston Lacombe is a photographer and filmmaker, originally from the Canadian province of New Brunswick.

He has left his footprints all over the globe, including living in Latvia for 12 years, and is presently based in Washington DC. He completed his Professional Photography degree at the Center for the Digital Imaging Arts at Boston University (Washington DC campus), and also has studied at the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. level in History.

He specializes mostly in documentary projects that have taking him to all corners of the planet. This includes an art residency in Antarctica with the government of Argentina in early 2012. His work has been shown in PDN magazine, the Washington Post, the Toronto Star, and many other publications. His photos have also been exhibited in solo and group shows in North America and Europe, including at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC.

 

Related links

Gaston Lacombe

 

0
Your rating: None

Picked up a New Yorker issue dated 7 May, 2012 from a London newsagents’ last night…First time in a while..Would obviously like to read The New Yorker on a regular basis, but there just isn’t enough time nor money to buy  every magazine I want. Nevertheless, trying to keep at least some kind of tabs on the magazine by picking up a copy every now and then.

Anyway. There’s a point here. Really liked this portrait of boxer Claressa Shields by photographer Pari Dukovic.  Very simple, and very nice. Claressa Shields is a young American boxer who’s fighting for a place at this summer’s London Olympics. Long piece about her in the magazine written by Ariel Levy.

Caption: Claressa Shields at Berston’s gym, in Flint, Michigan. 

Pari Dukovic is a photographer whose work I don’t remember seeing before.  Had to have a quick look at his website. He was part of PDN30 in 2011, so I obviously hadn’t done my home work well enough. There’s some documentary work in there, such as the series on Turkish oil wrestling, which you might want to check out (Paolo Pellegrin shot the same subject recently and should you want to compare…you can see Pellegrin’s here.).  I enjoyed the most going through Dukovic’s tear sheets (New Yorker appears to be a regular client). Digging the gritty and grainy quality in some of his work, visible for example in portraits of Elizabeth Warren and Bernadette Peters (you can see those in the tear sheets) . Interestingly, the Shields portrait highlighted here  doesn’t necessarily seem like his usual style at all.

NB. Please excuse the poor reproduction of the tear sheet. You can see in its proper glory on Dukovic’s website. I shot the tear sheet with my iPhone on a moving train… Where I’m writing this post…

0
Your rating: None

Features and Essays 

Egypt, Cairo, Tahrir….

Moises Saman has been kicking ass with his Cairo work…NYT front page pics on several occasions during the last two weeks…This is the slideshow a lot of people were talking about over the weekend…

Moises Saman: Cairo Undone (NYT) Cairo Undone on Magnum site.

Saman hit the front page also today (November 29) with an image  (to-me maybe not so obvious choice) seen below, which can be found online in the NYT’s Egypt Turmoil slideshow…featuring work by various photographers.

photo: Moises Saman

Below image ran on the front page of the International Herald Tribune last week….You can see it in black and white in this Saman’s tweet…The colour version is up on Magnum Photos site…

Moises Saman: Unrest in Cairo: Egypt’s Revolution Continues (Magnum)

Miguel Angel Sanchez: Egyptians (NYT Lens) Angel Sanchez’s website

Davide Monteleone: Egypt Waiting (VII)

Espen Rasmussen: Beyond Tahrir Square (Panos)

Guy Martin: The Egyptian Revolution (Panos)

Trevor Snapp: Revolution Round Two? (Global Post) Full edit on photographer’s archive

NB. See later in this post regarding the latest TIME cover on Egypt that ran on all markets except the US. Filed under Articles.

Tim Hetherington’s last images on Magnum Photos…

Credit: Tim Hetherington. LIBYA. Misurata. April 20, 2011. Tim’s last photograph.

Tim Hetherington: The Libya Negs (Magnum)

Occupy Wall Street…

Christopher Anderson: OWS (New York Magazine)

Noticed that Ashley Gilbertson’s OWS series shot in October had sadly disappeared from VII site, but the reason turned out to be that New Yorker had put him on assignment (here’s a pic of him working)…I’m sure the series will reappear on VII in the future, but for now we can enjoy an edit on Photo Booth…good news: it includes new frames, such as the below one,  shot this month…

Ashley Gilbertson: Occupy Wall Street (Photo Booth)

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Related to OWS issues I would say… Great series on American poverty by Joakim Eskildsen…

Joakim Eskildsen: Photographs of American Poverty (Lightbox)

From the other side of the American political spectrum…

Jason Andrew: Tea Party: Under the banners of American Flags  (Reportage)

DRC and elections…

Finbarr O’Reilly: Deadly Election Violence in Congo (Reuters)

Jonathan Torgovnik: Rebuilding DRC (Reportage)

Pierre Gonnord: Relatos (Lightbox)

Liz Hingley: Under Gods (Lightbox)

Gillian Laub: Turkey Day (Lightbox)

Paul Fusco: DGI  29 (Magnum in Motion)

Alixandra Fazzina: The Flowers of Afghanistan: First Sea (Photographer’s archive)

Pep Bonet: Microcredit Peru (NOOR)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Caspian (Foto8)

Saw and edit of this feature run in Time mag couple of weeks ago..

Xavier Zimbardo: Reconstruction of the Bolshoi Theatre (Reportage) Behind the scenes video with Xavier Zimbardo in French

Best of the year….

photo: Goran Tomasevic

Reuters : Best Photos of the Year 2011

photo: Lynsey Addario

VII – Best of 2011: Highlights of a Year in News   : VII photographers present their best images, shot or released in 2011

AFP: 2011 Pictures of the Year

Fan of David Cameron or not,these Tom Stoddart photos in Reportage Tumblr are worth seeing.Cameron by Stoddart for Sunday Times Magazine….

Tom Stoddart: David Cameron (Reportage Tumblr)

Andrew McConnell’s Gaza surfing series on Newsweek…Bummed I still haven’t received the first issue of my annual subscription… Would have loved to have seen this in print…

Andrew McConnell: Surf’s Up in Gaza (Newsweek)

McConnell from Gaza also, but very different…NGO piece…

Andrew McConnell: Regenerating Gaza (Guardian)

Japan…

Giulio Di Sturco: Awash in Wrackage :  Japan (PDNPhotoaDay)

Kishin Shinoyama: After the Storm: Post-Tsunami Japan (Lightbox)

Donald Weber: Life After Zero Hour (VII) Japan

Davide Monteleone: Dusha: Russian Soul (VII)

Stefano di Luigi: Hidden China (VII)

Massimo Berruti: Lashkars in Pakistan (Lightbox) The series in Le Monde

Annie Leibovitz:  Pilgrimage (NYT)

Luceo Images: Few and Far Between (NYT Lens)

Joao Pina: Tracing the Shadows of Operation Condor (NYT Lens)

Andew Testa: Mind the Masterpiece (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter Photos from the Skies Above Poland (NYT Lens)

Jared Moossy: Mourning in Mogadishu (Foreign Policy)

Sebastian Liste: Urban Quilombo (Reportage)

Teun Voeten: Narco Estado (Magnum Emergency Fund)

Nick Cobbing: The Solid Sea (Photographer’s website)

Harvey Wang: A World of Change on the Lower East Side (NYT)

Robb Hill: Rural Home Town (NYT Lens)

Suzanne Opton: Soldier Down: Portraits (Lightbox)

Kirill Nikitenko: Russian Portraits of Defiance (Newsweek) Nikitenko’s website

Brian Van Der Brug: In Prison and Dying (LA Times Framework photo blog)

Lourdes Jeannette: Blood Ties (Lightbox)

Caged animals.

Asmita Parelkar: Not-So-Wild-Kingdom (NYT Lens)

Stuffed animals.

Klaus Pichler: Behind the Scenes Photos of Natural History (NYT Lens)

Guillaume Herbaut: The Zone (Project website) Now in English

Guillermo Arias: Tijuana River City (zReportage)

Kate Holt: The Real Cost of War (zReportage)

Natalie Naccache Mourad: Madaneh Marriages (photographer’s website)

Marc Lester: Living with Breast Cancer (Anchorage Daily News)

Oli Scarff: Winners at the Poultry Club’s 2011 national show (Guardian)

 Interviews and Talks


David Douglas Duncan (Lightbox)

Seamus Murphy (Verve Photo)

David Alan Harvey (Develop photo Vimeo)

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #6 (Phaidon)

Giles Duley : Becoming the Story (Economist)

Jason Larkin (Frontline club)

Alissa Everett : Giving up finance for photojournalism (CNN)

Sebastian Liste pt.1 / pt.2 (Daylight Magazine)

Marco Grob : How I Got That Shot: The 3-Minute Portrait (PDN)

Is this Annie Leibovitz and Fuji X100?

Annie Leibovitz (NPR)

Annie Leibovitz ♥’s Her iPhone Camera (PDN)

Jodi Bieber talks about the reaction to her World Press Photo winning photograph on The Strand (BBC)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (The Broad’s Sheet)

Useful advice by Rachel Palmer…

Rachel Palmer : How to get a photography commission for an NGO (photographer’s/photo editor’s website)

Kate Peters (IdeasTap)

Eric White (MSNBC photo blog)

Lisa Pritchard : Ask an Agent 5 (LPA blog)

Liz Hingley : Turning point (NYT Lens)

BagNewsSalon webinar, “The Visual Politics of Occupy Wall Street.” :  4 December

Videos

BBC: The ‘genius’ of Tim Hetherington killed in war

Articles 

Time magazine does it again….’dummying-up’ (I might have just made up that word) the US edition I mean… My mate Tim Fadek has the TIME cover this week with a terrific image from Cairo in all markets expect the US….

Peek inside…This is how Tim’s two other photos ran…

Comment…

Business Insider: These Time Magazine Covers Explain Why Americans Know Nothing About The World

PDN: Israel Apologizes to Lynsey Addario

Saw Lynsey Addario ( @lynseyaddario) tweet a link to this Marie Claire piece on female photojournalists…Featuring Addario herself, Agnes Dherbeys, Erin Trieb, Stephanie Sinclair, and Andrea Bruce

photo: Stephanie Sinclair

Marie Claire: Female Photojournalists | “Once thought of as too frail for the job, five award-winning women photojournalists share their most vivd memories from the field — and the images they will never forget.”

Related…

NYT: Arrests and Attacks on Women Covering Protests in Cairo 

NYT: Software to Rate How Dratically Photos Are Retouched

PDN: Inside the Bestseller List: Top Photo Books of 2011

NYT: Shooting for Global Change (NYT Lens)

I was in Istanbul over the weekend, but sadly had no time to check out any of these exhibitions…

photo: Bruno Barbey

NYT: A Whirling Document of Turkish Culture

PDN: Cartier-Bresson Photo Sets Record at Christie’s Auction in Paris

Yahoo: Camera lost at sea returned with the help of social networking

TimeOut: Photography galleries in London

Dvafoto: Find Copyright Violations of Your Pictures With src-img Bookmarklet

A Photo Editor: Real World Estimates – Flat Rate Magazine Contracts

BJP: Editorial photographers hit by latest Getty Images cuts

BJP: Photographer Jean-Christian Bourcart wins the 2011 Prix Nadar for his book Camden

BJP: Celebrated printer Gene Nocon dies

Joerg Colberg: What Photographs Can and Cannot Do (Conscientious)

Guardian: Jodi Bieber’s Best Shot

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Tim Wimborne

Photoshelter Guide: Selling Stock Photography

Foto8: Book review – Ben Lowy: Iraq Perspectives

Related..

A Photo Editor: This Week In Photography Books

Looking into some  heavy duty camera ‘bags’… Saw Greg Funnell tweet this review he had done in 2008…

Greg Funnell: Gear Review : Think Tank Airport Security Vs Pelican Case 1510 (Photographer’s blog)

Verve Photo: Jake Price

Awards, Grants, and Competitions 

photo: Jan Grarup

Leica Oskar Barnack Award will be accepting entries from 16 January 

College Photographer of the Year : International picture story winning images & judges screencast are online

Rory Peck Awards Winners

FotoEvidence Book Award open for submissions

Photo Lucida Critical Mass 2011 Winners

FotoVisura Grant

LPA Student Challenges 

Crowd Funding

Emphas.is Crowdfunding photojournalism survey

Behind the smokescreen by Rocco Rorandelli (Emphas.is) featured on BJP

Grozny – Nine Cities by Kravets, Morina, Yushko (Emphas.is) project featured on NYT Lens in 2010

Agencies and Collectives

VII Newsletter

Panos Pictures newsletter

Statement Images submissions deadline extended

Jobs

Look3 : Exhibits Coordinator

Saw these on Twitter…

New Yorker : spring multimedia intern (students only) : Contact kristina_budelis[at]newyorker.com

Redux is in need of an intern in NYC office : Adobe Creative Suite skills is necessary:  send an email to submissions[at]reduxpictures.com with Internship in the subject line

Intern for Phaidon.com . Email features@phaidon.com with your CV

Desk Space

Roof Unit : London

Photographers 

Website relaunch…

Marcus Bleasdale

Benjamin Lowy : December 2011 Promo

Asmita Parelkar

Louis Quail

Caleb Ferguson

Marc Lester

Bruno Mancinelle

To finish off…

Very, very good Erroll Morris short… The Umbrella Man from NYT

0
Your rating: None

Hurricane Irene wound up by most estimates as one of the top ten most destructive and deadly hurricanes to hit the United States since 1980. While ultimately not as powerful as many had predicted, the storm still killed at least 27 people along its path from the Caribbean to the eastern seaboard. Transportation was shut down all along the east coast, stranding residents and tourists in shelters, airports, and train stations. More than 5.8 million customers lost electricity, thousands of flights were cancelled, flooding washed out roads and destroyed homes, and evacuation orders were issued for hundreds of thousands. Gathered here are pictures from the Hurricane's path. -- Lane Turner (44 photos total)
Billy Stinson comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood on August 28, 2011 in Nags Head, N.C. The cottage, built in 1903 and destroyed by Hurricane Irene, was one of the first vacation cottages built on Albemarle Sound in Nags Head. Stinson has owned the home, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, since 1963. "We were pretending, just for a moment, that the cottage was still behind us and we were just sitting there watching the sunset," said Erin afterward. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

18585Screenshot0057.jpg

Like Deep Sea, Journey is a story about solitude.

However, while the former personifies everything we fear about isolation, Journey does not. If anything, it articulates the beauty of it, of being somewhere without society, of being separate. Journey is a reminder that you can be alone without being lonely.

It's also, hands down, one of the best-looking games I saw at E3.

Journey does not so much begin as it does awaken along with your character. Sunlight dims and bleeds away, allowing a glimpse of your surroundings. You stand. Instructions flash on screen, indicating that the camera is tied to the movements of the Sixaxis. There is no text. There never is. A moment later, you're wordlessly informed that the left analog stick dictates movement. Instinct takes over. You begin walking. Slowly and laboriously, the protagonist plods up the nearest hill.

Particles of sand whisper away with each step you take. At times, the light catches on the sand dunes, making them look like they were patinaed with diamond dust. A stray zephyr dances by, its path marked by the ripples in the desert. Each step you take has weight. The sand slides and settles, displaced with every movement, adjusting to the march of our cloth-swaddled protagonist. Before the first five minutes were up, I found an overwhelming urge to hug the people responsible for Journey's world welling up. I had attended a panel in New York that delineated the process behind the creation of Journey. I had seen footage of the staff experimenting with the real-life physics of a sand dune. I've even stood behind people, watching the game in action on an enormous screen. None of it, however, prepared for the actual experience and the first few moments I spent in that glorious wasteland.

Like the other games that the developers have made, Journey strips away conceptions. The protagonist itself is asexual. The colors that it wears could easily be donned by either gender. With its musculature obscured by fabric and no discernible features, it would be an alien thing were its fate not so intimately familiar. Much like the rest of us, it's on an expedition with an uncertain future. Is the mountain in the distance where everyone else has gone? Is it a settlement, a bastion of strength, a place of family and belonging, or where these creatures go to die? It's hard to say.

18578Barrems1.jpg

As the game progresses, our protagonist eventually becomes endowed with a scarf that allows for limited flight. Fuel, in the game, is defined by the hieroglyphics present on that stretch of red cloth. As you fly around, the sigils will eventually dissipate, leaving you land-bound. Fortunately, it isn't difficult to have flight restored. Though uninhabitated by anything made of flesh, Journey is resplendent with an ecosystem of its own. Calling to the most basic and plentiful of these life forms -- tiny, restless scraps of cloth that live in swarms -- will cause them to float towards you, thereafter revitalizing our silent hero. More complex beings are also present within the natural world. I didn't get a chance to play too deeply thanks to time contraints but I had the opportunity to see strange, kite-like things that could pass for energetic puppies or dolphins in the sand.

Communication in Journey is yet another interesting aspect of the game. By traditional standards, there isn't much of it. Press one button and the protagonist will sing a note. That's about the extent of it. There are no means to construct complex sentences, no multiple choices in a dialogue; the most we can do is affect the duration of the call by holding down the button. But as restrictive as this might sound, it really isn't. In some ways, it's almost liberating. Journey does not coerce you into a personality that is not your own. You're left to do as you will within the boundaries set by the game and that, of course, opens up a whole realm of possibilities with the multiplayer options.

I spent the first quarter of the demo alone, slowly traversing the vast expanses of the world. Stumbling over the half-buried ruins of an ancient civilization led to encounters with something that could have been a pre-programmed hologram or a deity. A story was told then. I watched, wondered and then left. Sometime in my explorations, another figure showed up. Journey, as many know already, will have you meet other people from time to time. However, you'll never know who they are and where they might have come from; all you'll share is that moment in Journey. I remember being skeptical about the depth of such interaction up till the point I met someone else in the demo.

18582Desert3.jpg

The joy was immediate. After ascertaining that the other person was indeed a living, breathing human being, I ran up to them and let loose a chorus of notes in greeting. They responded in kind. For a while, we did nothing but spiral over one another, seemingly elated at our mutual companionship. Words really were unneccessary. It was, somehow, enough to be just be there, in the presence of another person. Sadly, that was about as far as I played. About five minutes after encountering the other person, I had to surrender the console to the next in line.

Journey is a lot of things. It's beautiful, it's a little sad, it's an adventure and a place to lose yourself in all at once. While waiting for my turn at the game, I had the opportunity to talk to Jenova Chen and question him about the creation of the game. He told me that the team had discovered through real-life experimentation that sand-surfing wasn't probable, something that does not reflect in Journey's sand-swept world. Why the decision then? To paraphrase the conversation, Journey wasn't made to simulate our world as much as it was to expand upon it. There had to be a little bit of magic, he said, and there is. In fact, there's a lot of magic to be found here.

An oasis of calm amidst the ear-splitting clamor of E3 2011, I cannot wait to go back to Journey, to explore, to finally figure out what lies beyond that mountain. Who knows? Maybe, I'll find my mysterious friend again too.

0
Your rating: None

So we finally got the good news on Monday that Addario, Hicks, Farrell, and Shadid had been released. You can read the account of their detention on the New York Times website…

Articles - NYT: 4 Times Journalists Held Captive in Libya Faced Days of Brutality (NYT: March 2011) an earlier article Freed Times Journalists Give Account of Captivity

Articles - CPJ: Times reporters freed in Libya; 13 still missing, detained (CPJ: March 2011)

NB. Joe Raedle of Getty and David Clark and Roberto Schmidt of AFP, mentioned in the CPJ article above have been reported free this morning and leaving Libya.

Articles – BJP: Reuters’ photographer Goran Tomasevic scores front page success (BJP: March 2011)

Alex Majoli’s Libya work in black and white now on Magnum site… There are several photos in there that were previously shown in colour on Newsweek’s site..I think I prefer the black and white ones….

Features and Essays - Alex Majoli: Libya Uprising (Magnum: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Franco Pagetti: Libya, Dreaming of a Revolution (VII: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Luis Sinco: Libya (LA Times: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Andy Rocchelli, Gabriele Micalizzi: Libya Civil War (Cesuralab: March 2011)

Ben Lowy has been posting some  iPhone Hipstas from Libya on his Tumblr…

TumblrBen Lowy

Christopher Morris’ updated Libya gallery on Lightbox here.

Features and Essays - Marco Salustro: Volunteer Human Shields in Tripoli (Corbis: March 2011)

InterviewsPatrick Baz Is in His Element in Libya (NYT Lens: March 2011)

Backstory on the release of the Guardian’s Ghaith Abdul Ahad from Libya last week (via @foodforyoureyes)…

Articles – Press Gazzette: Guardian editor gives credit to Turkey and Libya as he reveals inside story of Ghaith Abdul-Ahad’s release (Press Gazzette: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Baptiste Giroudon: Egypt:Life after the Revolution (Photographer’s website: March 2011)

Articles – BagNewsNotes: Alan Chin on the Middle East: Ghosts of Suez and Srebrenica (BNN: March 2011)

Articles - BagNewsNotes: Nicole Tung in Eastern Libya: Fresh To My Virgin Eyes (BNN: March 2011) (NB: post includes one extremely graphic image)

Articles - Jorg Colberg: A War of Images (Conscientious: March 2011)

Over 1,600 clicks on the ‘photo within a photo’ from Libya seen below, that I put on Twitpic the other day… So here it is again.. On the left you can see Paul Conroy’s photo, and if you look closely, you can see a pair of legs behind Tyler Hicks (first photographer from the right). I’m fairly certain, those legs belong to Yuri Kozyrev, who is taking the photo on the right pretty much at the same exact moment… Fairly random observation, I know, but still kinda interesting I thought…

To Japan..

From Newsweek…

Features and Essays - Q. Sakamaki: Aftermath (Newsweek: March 2011) Japan

Features and Essays - Peter Blakely: Japan: Relief Efforts Amid the Devastation (Newsweek: March 2011) Blakely’s website

MSNBC has a section titled Outside The Frame on their Photoblog, where AP photojournalist David Guttenfelder shares his experience covering the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan…A bit like the Backstory in Lightbox

Features and Essays - MSNBC: Outside the Frame (MSNBC: March 2011)

They also have panoramics from Japan on the Photoblog here, as well as some  ‘Japan before and after the earthquake, tsunami’ sliders

Some panoramic composites also on Lightbox, slightly differently executed though, and surprisingly by nobody other than James Nachtwey… 

Dispatch from Japan: James Nachtwey’s Impressions in Words and Pictures

Domic Nahr’s updated Japan gallery on Lightbox here.

Great BJP article on photographers working in Japan at the moment…

Articles – BJP: Japan Earthquake: Photographing the aftermath (BJP: March 2011)

Features and Essays - Donald Weber: Capital of the Third Millennium (VII Network: March 2011) Brasilia, Brazil

Looking forward to seeing this movie, although I am a bit sceptical as to whether it’ll be any good…

MoviesBang Bang Club trailer (Apple)

Articles - BJP: Movie to recount Bang Bang Club’s story (BJP: March 2011)

2011 FotoEvidence Book Award Winner…

Interviews - Paula Bronstein (Fotoevidence: March 2011)

Interviews - Terry O’Neill (Telegraph: March 2011)

Awards - The shortlist for the first World Press Photo multimedia contest has been announced (WPP: March 2011) From BJP

Articles / Tutorials and Tips - Mike Davis: Some Things To Consider When Entering Contests (Mike Davis blog: March 2011)

Videos Joel Meyerowitz 1981 Film

Articles -PDN: Appropriation Artist Richard Prince Liable for Infringement, Court Rules (PDN: March 2011) Also:  A Photo Editor: Richard Prince Loses Fair Use Argument (APE: March 2011)

Articles - Phaidon: Martin Parr takes cover for Esquire’s 20th anniversary (Phaidon: March 2011)

Agencies - David Chancellor joins Institute

Exhibitions - Tate Modern: Burke + Norfolk: Photographs From The War In Afghanistan : 6 May  –  10 July 2011 : Free entry!

Events Contact VS ASA Collective Slideshow evening (NB: Facebook link), 1st April : London

Exhibitions Laura Hynd, Michael Grieve, JH Engstrom and Tereza Zelenkova are on show at the Oblong Gallery until 23 March (BJP: March 2011)

I went to University College of Falmouth second year BA Press and Editorial Photography students’ exhibition, Progression, at Calument London…It’s a show of 34 photographs, one by each of the students on the course.

The exhibition is up for a month. Go and have a look if you happen to wonder around the Euston area in London, or have business in the aforementioned establishment. Big thanks to Dan Cainey for having invited me to the opening. Several promising works on display, so it was a pleasure.

BlogsHere by Harry Hardie

PhotographersYunghi Kim

Photographers - Shamil Tanna

PhotographersTal Cohen

0
Your rating: None