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Cable cars, algae bio-fuel cells, and urban agriculture are sandwiched into just a small slice of Arup's future skyscraper.

Rob Hunt/Arup

The urban buildings of the near-future will be tall, smart, adaptable, responsive, honest, modular, recyclable, clean, and deeply embedded into the systems of their host cities, if an imaginative vision from Arup's Foresight team is anything to judge by. In its evocatively titled It's Alive, Arup (the firm responsible for the structural design of the iconic Sydney Opera House) asks if we can imagine the urban building of the future while simultaneously presenting its take on the matter. The report contains plenty of ideas, albeit briefly stated, so I thought it would be fun to identify some of today's science and technology that has made it into Arup's skyscraper of tomorrow and discuss whether Arup's vision is more grounded in fact or fiction.


Arup's urban building of 2050 Rob Hunt/Arup

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times

Arup's future-scraper is the product of its time; a time 37 years from now that will suck and be awesome in approximately equal measures. Why suck? Because 37 years will see us through to the year 2050, and Arup shares (or perhaps borrows) the OECD's troubling forecast of a warming, overpopulated Earth hungry for, yet deficient in, essential resources. According to this narrative, there will be 9 billion people, with 6.3 billion living in towns and cities.

The good news is that we'll still have iPhones—or their future-proxies, at least. Arup describes the denizens of our future cities as "net-native adults" who have grown up with smart cities, smart clothes, and smart objects. The Internet of Things will be ubiquitous, Arup suggests; presumably to the point that it has been abbreviated simply to "things," the "Internet of" having been long since forgotten.

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FROZEN FLOAT
FROZEN FLOAT: A member of a swimming club lay on a chunk of ice on the Yenisei River in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, Wednesday. (Ilya Naymushin/Reuters)

WATER BREAK
WATER BREAK: A laborer drank water while he harvested wheat in Punjab, India, Wednesday. (Ajay Verma/Reuters)

WARMING UP
WARMING UP: Wrestlers carried each other during a practice session in Allahabad, India, Wednesday. (Jitendra Prakash/Reuters)

FISH FOR SALE
FISH FOR SALE: A vendor sold goldfish along a street in the Wazir Akbar Khan district in Kabul, Afghanistan, Wednesday. (Johannes Eisele/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

RUNNING WILD
RUNNING WILD: Horses trotted through a flooded area in Chaco, Paraguay, Tuesday. Rainfall last week caused flooding, killing an estimated 180,000 animals and several people and affecting hundreds of thousands of residents. (Ubaldo Gonzalez/Xinhua/Zuma Press)

TAKING AIM
TAKING AIM: A shooter videotaped himself as he trained for the International Shooting Sports Federation World Cup in London Wednesday. (Stefan Wermuth/Reuters)

ERUPTING
ERUPTING: Ash and smoke spewed from the Popocatépetl volcano, pictured from Puebla, Mexico, Wednesday. The volcano alert level remained high, but no evacuations were planned, according to a civil-defense radio dispatcher. (Jose Casta-Ares/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

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THREE CHEERS FOR MITT
THREE CHEERS FOR MITT: Elizabeth Cuevas-Nuenda, of the Puerto Rican Chamber of Congress, cheered as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney campaigned at the Hispanic Leadership Network’s luncheon at Doral Golf Resort & Spa in Miami, Fla., Friday. (Charles Dharapak/Associated Press)

SET POINT
SET POINT: Andy Murray of Britain celebrated winning the third set during his semifinal match against Novak Djokovic of Serbia at the Australian Open tennis tournament in Melbourne on Friday. Mr. Djokovic went on to win the match. (Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images)

BAD MEDICINE
BAD MEDICINE: Lubna mourned over the body of her uncle Chaudhry Mohammad Gulab, a heart patient who died in Lahore, Pakistan, on Friday. The government in Pakistan’s Punjab province is scrambling to recall contaminated drugs that have killed more than 100 people in the last month. (Mani Rana/Reuters)

GUNS AND FLAGS
GUNS AND FLAGS: A Syrian soldier who defected to join the Free Syrian Army held up his rifle and waved a Syrian independence flag in the Damascus suburb of Saqba on Friday. (Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters)

SOMBER ANNIVERSARY
SOMBER ANNIVERSARY: A white rose was placed on barbed wire at the museum of the former Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz Birkenau on Friday, marking the 67th anniversary of the liberation of the camp by Soviet troops. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

DISCONNECTED
DISCONNECTED: A cargo ship paused in the water on Friday after colliding with and partially collapsing a bridge near Aurora, Ky. The ship was traveling upriver toward the Kentucky Lock and Dam when it hit the steel bridge, which was built in the 1930s and handles about 2,800 vehicles a day. (Tina Carroll/Associated Press)

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There's still time! The deadline for entries for this year's National Geographic Photo Contest is November 30. Photographers of all skill levels (last year more than 16,000 images submitted by photographers from 130 countries) enter photographs in three categories: Nature, People and Places. The photographs are judged on creativity and photographic quality by a panel of experts. There is one first place winner in each category and a grand prize winner as well. The following is a selection of 54 entries from each of the 3 categories. The caption information is provided and written by the individual photographer. -- Paula Nelson (54 photos total)
LONE TREE YELLOWSTONE: A solitary tree surviving another harsh winter in Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. (Photo and caption by Anita Erdmann/Nature/National Geographic Photo Contest)

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Sri Lankan prisoners prepare to perform a traditional dance at the main Welikada prison in Colombo November 17, 2011. The cultural event is organized by the prisons department as part of the rehabilitation program for convicts, according to officials. Occupy Los Angeles protesters march through downtown during a rally Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011. Occupy Wall [...]

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Features and Essays

Tenth anniversary of the 9/11 is now passed us, but let’s start with some of the features related to it…Lot of good coverage on the New York Times’ web pages, obviously…First, Eugene Richards’ multimedia of his Stepping Through Ashes…

Eugene Richards: Stepping Through Ashes (NYT Lens: September 2011)

NYT Magazine slideshow ‘Images from a Post 9/11 World’..includes various photographers’ work… Benjamin Lowy, Lynsey Addario,Peter van Agtmael, Ashley Gilbertson, and others… also links to the articles, which their images originally illustrated…

After 9/11, National Guard and police patrols had become part of the commute at Grand Central Terminal. Security was increased further after the Madrid bombings. Related article: “Lesser Evils.”  photo: Antonin Kratochvil/VII

New York Times Magazine: Ten Years’ Time: Images from a Post 9/11 World (NYT Magazine: September 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson has some new work on the New York Times site also…

Ashley Gilbertson: Remembering Lost Loved Ones (NYT: September 2011)

Todd Heisler: The Moment Before, and After (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

Fred. R. Conrad: The Faces of a Towering Project (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Magnum: 9/11 and Aftermath (Magnum in Motion: September 2011)

Susan Meiselas: Ground Zero Artifacts and Construction (Magnum: September 2011)

Scott Goldsmith: Flight 93 and Shanksville, PA: The Forgotten Part of 9/11 (TIME LB: September 2011)

To other features…

Sanjit Das: East Africa Crisis (Panos: September 2011)

New work by last year’s Canon AFJ winner Bacigalupo, whose exhibition ‘My Name is Filda Adoch’ impressed a lot of people at Visa…

Martina Bacigalupo: Mogadishu, Somalia (Agence Vu: September 2011)

Patrick Brown: Bengal’s Burden (Panos: September 2011)

Espen Rasmussen’s In Transit project has now a dedicated website…

Espen Rasmussen: Transit (Project website: 2011)

Afghanistan…

Hipstas by Zalmai on Lens blog…

Zalmai: In Afghanistan, ‘Unbelievable Force of Life’ (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Norfolk on New Yorker Photo Booth…

Simon Norfolk: Postcard from Afghanistan : Echoes of Wars Past (New Yorker: September 2011)

Alixandra Fazzina: Pakistan: Preparing for disaster in south Punjab (Guardian: September 2011)

Mitch Dobrowner: The Storms (TIME Lightbox: September 2011)

Have another look at Medecins Sans Frontieres’ and VII Photo’s Starved for Attention campaign online… There’s a travelling exhibit going around the States this autumn…

photo: Marcus Bleasdale

MSF and VII Photo: Starved for Attention 

Andrea Bruce: Conservative Muslims in Russia (Washington Post: September 2011)

Christian Als: The Disappeared Generation (Panos: September 2011)

Moises Saman: Detained Sub-Saharan Africans in Libya (Magnum: September 2011)

Foreign Policy  have a three-part series online featuring Kate Brooks‘ work from Afghanistan, Iraq, Egypt, and Libya…The photos are taken from her new book

Kate Brooks: What War Looks Like (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: Those Who Face Death (Foreign Policy: September 2011)

Kate Brooks: From Revolution to War (FP: September 2011)

Johannes Eisele: The Casualties of War: Afghanistan’s Medevac Missions, Up Close (TIME LB: September 2011)

Stanley Greene: A Drop of Blood between Turkey and Syria (NOOR: 2011)

Kozyrev’s Tripoli photos now also on the NOOR site…

Yuri Kozyrev: The Battle for Tripoli (NOOR: September 2011)

Ruben Reyes: Foreign Laborers in Dubai (NYT Lens: September 2011) Reys’ website

Japan…

William Daniels and Espen Rasmussen: Six Months On (Panos: September 2011) Japan

Jake Price: Japan six months after tsunami (BBC: September 2011)

Ed Kashi: Eye Contact (VII Magazine: September 2011)

Laura El-Tantawy: The Veil (TIME LB: August 2011)

Edward Keating: Blue Highway (TIME LB: September 2011)

Anthony Suau: The 99ers (TIME: September 2011) Long-term unemployed in America

Mauricio Lima: Few Treatment Options for Afghans as Drug Use Rises (NYT: August 2011)

Jean Gaumy: Climate challenge : The Indonesian case (Magnum: September 2011)

David Trattles: Girl Boxers of Calcutta (Foto8: September 2011) Trattles’ website

Jessica Earnshaw: At a Bronx Hospital, a Teenage Milestone (NYT Lens: September 2011) Earnshaw’s website

Interviews

First some 9/11 anniversary related interviews…

Robert Clark : 9/11 (burn magazine: September 2011)

Lynsey Addario : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Samantha Appleton : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Joel Meyerowitz : 9/11 Ten Years Later (New Yorker: September 2011)

Meyerowitz interview also on TIME… looks like he’s working with Leica S2 here…

Joel Meyerowitz : Ground Zero, Then and Now (TIME: September 2011)

Eric Hoepker : 9/11 (CNN: September 2011) CNN’s Errol Barnett speak to photographer Thomas Hoepker who took one of the most controversial 9/11 images

Steve McCurry on 9/11…

Steve McCurry :  memories of 9/11 (Phaidon: September 2011)

Interesting thing I noticed the other day looking at some of McCurry’s 9/11 photos on his blog was that he has a frame almost exactly like one of Nachtwey’s… The two men must have stood pretty much side-by-side…The colours are different, but I presume it’s because Nachtwey was shooting C-41 and McCurry E-6…It’s fascinating how similarly the two photographers framed the scene…

Marco Grob : on the Making of Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience (TIME LB: September 2011)

Steve McCurry (Leica blog: September 2011)

Steve McCurry : Revealed – the true story behind the ‘Afghan Mona Lisa’ (Phaidon: September 2011)

Olivier Laurent’s excellent Yuri Kozyrev interview in British Journal of Photography…

Must read. Yuri Kozyrev : on covering revolutions in the Middle East (BJP: September 2011)

Kozyrev interview also on Lighbox…this about one of his Iraq War photos, one the most memorable and powerful images of the entire conflict by anyone I’d say…Couldn’t help but notice the file has been re-processed…

Yuri Kozyrev The Aftermath of 9/11: Ali Abbas (TIME LB: September 2011)

Fred Ritchin : Ritchin letter regarding the Q&A (Wired Raw File: September 2011)

Broomberg and Chanarin (ph-research.co.uk: 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen : Via Panam part 2 (Nikon blog: September 2011)

David Chancellor talks about ‘Hunters” (Polka: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Outposts (National Media Museum Vimeo: 2011)

Donovan Wylie : Ways of Looking (National Media Museum: Vimeo 2011)

Martin Parr : Parrworld (Phaidon: 2011)

Nadav Kander (Conscientious: 2011)

Mario Tama : 9/11 (Dallas News: September 2011)

Jodi Bieber : Capturing Aisha (Montreal Mirror: September 2011)

Catalina Martin-Chico (BJP: August 2011)

Tyler Hicks : Gaddafi Family Album (NYT Lens: August 2011)

JR (The Atlantic: 2011)

Jared Soares (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Pete Brook (thoughtsonphotography: September 2011)

Articles

9/11 related articles… I particularly enjoyed reading and looking at this one from TIME Lightbox…

photo: Jonathan Torgovnik

TIME Lightbox: 9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most (TIME LB: September 2011)

How magazines picked their 9/11 anniversary covers…

NYT: Magazine Covers on a Topic Known All Too Well (NYT: September 2011) 9/11

NPR: Sept. 11 Through The Eyes Of VII, Magnum And Life (NPR: September 2011)

Guardian: 9/11 anniversary: photographers recall day of horror (Guardian: September 2011)

New York Times: The Reckoning: America and the World a Decade After 9/11 (NYT: September 2011

Thomas Hoepker: I Took That 9/11 Photo (Slate: 2006) Photographer Thomas Hoepker on Frank Rich’s column, and why he thought his picture was too “confusing” to publish in 2001.

David Campbell: September 11, 2001: Imaging the real, struggling for meaning (DC blog: September 2011)

Alan Chin: Pushpins on a calendar (BagNewsNotes: September 2011)

Chris Floyd: The 9/11 Patriotic American Road Trip (Photographer’s Blog: September 2011)

Peta Pixel: How Photographers’ Rights Have Eroded Since September 11th (Peta Pixel: 2011)

Other articles…

photo: David Alan Harvey

Ideas Tap: Magnum: Advice for young photographers – part 2 (Ideas Tap: September 2011)

UK Photographer’s Rights (Amateur Photographer: September 2011)

The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books…includes a shout-out to Luc Delahaye at Tate Modern..only three prints on show though (installation shot I took with my phone when I visited the show in August)…I enjoyed them…

Jenin Refugee Camp, 2001. Luc Delahaye.  From the exhibition New Documentary Forms at Tate Modern, London…worth a visit also for Mitch Epstein’s American Power…not so keen on the other three…

The Observer: The Month in Photography September 2011

NY Daily News: To honor slain photojournalist Tim Hetherington, fellow photog opens docu-film gallery in Bronx (NY Daily News: September 2011)

Reportage by Getty Images: Tom Stoddart shoots the ICRC  ’Health Care in Danger’ campaign

Photo Stories: Webdoc Favourites (photo-stories-org: 2011)

BJP: Photographers’ Gallery delays reopening until 2012

BJP: Photojournalism award launched in tribute to fallen photographer Lucas Dolega

BJP: Guillaume Herbaut and Bruno Masi win the Web Documentary Award at Visa Pour l’Image

Magnum: Steve McCurry Wins First Leica Hall Of Fame Award  (Magnum: 2011)

New Statesman:  The ambiguous art of Taryn Simon (New Statesman: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Oded Balilty (Guardian: August 2011)

Verve: Stuart Freedman (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Verve: Pete Marovich (Verve Photo: September 2011)

Pete Kiehart: Once: A New Magazine Model (Photo Brigade: September 2011)

BJP: Fujifilm commits to instant photography (BJP: September 2011)

Agency Access: Agency Access Acquires ADBASE and FoundFolios to Become Most Robust Photo Marketing and Illustrator Marketing Resource

10 Famous Street Photography Quotes You Must Know (Erik Kim Photography blog: September 2011)

Pulitzer-winning photojournalist resigns rather than lay off staff

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

UNICEF Pictures of the Year Award 2011 (link to PDF)

Five finalists for the inaugural Reminders Project Asian Photographers Grant

Tracy Baran Award : $5000 grant for an emerging US female photographer

Congrats to all this year’s Foam Magazine Talents…

photo: Ivor Prickett

Foam Magazine Talents 2011

Royal Photographic Society : Annual Awards 2011

Guardian Student Media Awards shortlisted

Click About It

Books

Kate Brooks: In The Light Of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey After 9/11

Conversations with Photographers (Conscientious)

Out November 1…

VII: Questions Without Answers 

Ken Jarecke: Husker Game Day – Farewell Big 12 

burn 02

The Family by Jocelyn Bain Hogg

Crowd Funding

Laura El-Tantawy just launched an Emphas.is crowd funding campaign to help her continue her work in Egypt…go and have a look…

Laura El-Tantawy: In the Shadow of the Pyramids (Emphas.is)

Agencies

VII September 2011 newsletter

Shell Shock Pictures

24Productions

Events

British Journal of Photography : ‘From stills to moving images’ at The Social on Monday 26 September, at Barrio Central, Poland Street, London W1F 8PS

Exhibitions

“If I don’t photograph it, it won’t become known.” Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus : At War : Berlin : 10 September – 4 December 2011

Chris Floyd: 140 Characters  : Host Gallery : 3 November – 17 November 2011 : press release

Photographers

Pamela Chen

Robert Nickelsberg

Patrick Smith

Diana Markosian

Conor O’Leary

Magda Rakita

Videos

Danfung Dennis’ film Hell and Back Again opening in US theaters on Oct 5…

Hell and Back Again Trailer

C.J Chivers, Andre Liohn: Lethal Lessons in Misurata (NYT: 2011)

Aperture education Youtube channel

Workshops

Magnum Photos workshop Munich, 10-14 Oct with Pellegrin, Dworzak & Anderson

Jobs

Open Society Institute : Exhibition Coordinator

Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University

To finish off…

I was reading Finnish magazine Kuukausiliite this morning which had an article about Google Street View along with some photos by artist Jon Rafman… Noticed one of the images was similar to one by Mishka Henner…Looks like Henner and Rafman have used the same Google Street View frame for these two…

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Devastating floods, driven by unprecedented monsoon rains, began late in July 2010, leaving one-fifth of Pakistan submerged. The rains in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Sindh, Punjab and Balochistan regions of Pakistan directly affected 20 million people mostly by destruction of property, livelihood and infrastructure. It left 2,000 people dead and 11 million homeless. In this post, we revisit some of those affected as the monsoon season approaches the region again. The last five images by Reuters photographer Adrees Latif (click on the image to fade the photograph) show us his subjects almost one year later, as he brought them back to the place where he photographed them during the 2010 flooding. -- Paula Nelson (34 photos total)
A female refugee passes a kettle of tea to her husband in preparation to break their fast during the holy month of Ramadan at a camp for flood victims in Nowshera, northwest Pakistan on Aug. 2. The couple were forced from their home by floods last year that killed about 2,000 people and left 11 million homeless. (Fayaz Aziz/Reuters)

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Dwi Oblo's picture, draws you in through the light and the smoke, to evoke a real feeing of people humbling themselves as they pay respects to their dead relatives as they also prepare for Ramadan.

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Targeted violence against females, dismal healthcare and desperate poverty make Afghanistan the world's most dangerous country in which to be born a woman, with Congo a close second due to horrific levels of rape. Pakistan, India and Somalia ranked third, fourth and fifth, respectively, in the global survey of perceptions of threats ranging from domestic abuse and economic discrimination to female foeticide (the destruction of a fetus in the uterus), genital mutilation and acid attack. A survey compiled by the Thomson Reuters Foundation to mark the launch of TrustLaw Woman*, puts Afghanistan at the top of the list of the most dangerous places in the world for women. TrustLaw asked 213 gender experts from five contents to rank countries by overall perceptions of danger as well as by six categories of risk. The risks consisted of health threats, sexual violence, non-sexual violence, cultural or religious factors, lack of access to resources and trafficking. The collection of images that follow were provided by Reuters to illustrate the dangers women face in those 5 countries. -- Paula Nelson (*TrustLaw Woman is a website aimed at providing free legal advice for women’s' groups around the world.) (37 photos total)
Women in Afghanistan have a near total lack of economic rights, rendering it a severe threat to its female inhabitants. An Afghan soldier uses a wooden stick to maintain order among women waiting for humanitarian aid at a World Food Programme WFP distribution point in the city of Kabul, December 14, 2001. The U.N. (WFP) started its biggest ever food distribution in the Afghan capital, handing out sacks of wheat to more than three-quarters of the war-ravaged city's population. (Damir Sagolj/Reuters)

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