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Original author: 
Wilson Page

  

When the mockups for the new Financial Times application hit our desks in mid-2012, we knew we had a real challenge on our hands. Many of us on the team (including me) swore that parts of interface would not be possible in HTML5. Given the product team’s passion for the new UI, we rolled up our sleeves and gave it our best shot.

We were tasked with implementing a far more challenging product, without compromising the reliable, performant experience that made the first app so successful.

promo-500-compr

We didn’t just want to build a product that fulfilled its current requirements; we wanted to build a foundation that we could innovate on in the future. This meant building with a maintenance-first mentality, writing clean, well-commented code and, at the same time, ensuring that our code could accommodate the demands of an ever-changing feature set.

In this article, I’ll discuss some of the changes we made in the latest release and the decision-making behind them. I hope you will come away with some ideas and learn from our solutions as well as our mistakes.

Supported Devices

The first Financial Times Web app ran on iPad and iPhone in the browser, and it shipped in a native (PhoneGap-esque) application wrapper for Android and Windows 8 Metro devices. The latest Web app is currently being served to iPad devices only; but as support is built in and tested, it will be rolled out to all existing supported platforms. HTML5 gives developers the advantage of occupying almost any mobile platform. With 2013 promising the launch of several new Web application marketplaces (eg. Chrome Web Store and Mozilla Marketplace), we are excited by the possibilities that lie ahead for the mobile Web.

Fixed-Height Layouts

The first shock that came from the new mockups was that they were all fixed height. By “fixed height,” I mean that, unlike a conventional website, the height of the page is restricted to the height of the device’s viewport. If there is more content than there is screen space, overflow must be dealt with at a component level, as opposed to the page level. We wanted to use JavaScript only as a last resort, so the first tool that sprang to mind was flexbox. Flexbox gives developers the ability to declare flexible elements that can fill the available horizontal or vertical space, something that has been very tricky to do with CSS. Chris Coyier has a great introduction to flexbox.

Using Flexbox in Production

Flexbox has been around since 2009 and has great support on all the popular smartphones and tablets. We jumped at the chance to use flexbox when we found out how easily it could solve some of our complex layouts, and we started throwing it at every layout problem we faced. As the app began to grow, we found performance was getting worse and worse.

We spent a good few hours in Chrome Developers Tools’ timeline and found the culprit: Shock, horror! — it was our new best friend, flexbox. The timeline showed that some layouts were taking close to 100 milliseconds; reworking our layouts without flexbox reduced this to 10 milliseconds! This may not seem like a lot, but when swiping between sections, 90 milliseconds of unresponsiveness is very noticeable.

Back to the Old School

We had no other choice but to tear out flexbox wherever we could. We used 100% height, floats, negative margins, border-box sizing and padding to achieve the same layouts with much greater performance (albeit with more complex CSS). Flexbox is still used in some parts of the app. We found that its impact on performance was less expensive when used for small UI components.

layout-time-with-flexbox-500_comp
Page layout time with flexbox

layout-time-without-flexbox-500_comp
Page layout time without flexbox

Truncation

The content of a fixed-height layout will rarely fit its container; eventually it has to overflow. Traditionally in print, designers have used ellipses (three dots) to solve this problem; however, on the Web, this isn’t the simplest technique to implement.

Ellipsis

You might be familiar with the text-overflow: ellipsis declaration in CSS. It works great, has awesome browser support, but has one shortfall: it can’t be used for text that spans multiple lines. We needed a solution that would insert an ellipsis at the point where the paragraph overflows its container. JavaScript had to step in.

ellipsis-500_mini
Ellipsis truncation is used throughout.

After an in-depth research and exploration of several different approaches, we created our FTEllipsis library. In essence, it measures the available height of the container, then measures the height of each child element. When it finds the child element that overflows the container, it caps its height to a sensible number of lines. For WebKit-based browsers, we use the little-known -webkit-line-clamp property to truncate an element’s text by a set number of lines. For non-WebKit browsers, the library allows the developer to style the overflowing container however they wish using regular CSS.

Modularization

Having tackled some of the low-level visual challenges, we needed to step back and decide on the best way to manage our application’s views. We wanted to be able to reuse small parts of our views in different contexts and find a way to architect rock-solid styling that wouldn’t leak between components.

One of the best decisions we made in implementing the new application was to modularize the views. This started when we were first looking over the designs. We scribbled over printouts, breaking the page down into chunks (or modules). Our plan was to identify all of the possible layouts and modules, and define each view (or page) as a combination of modules sitting inside the slots of a single layout.

Each module needed to be named, but we found it very hard to describe a module, especially when some modules could have multiple appearances depending on screen size or context. As a result, we abandoned semantic naming and decided to name each component after a type of fruit — no more time wasted thinking up sensible, unambiguous names!

An example of a module’s markup:


<div class="apple">
  <h2 class="apple_headline">{{headline}}</h2>
  <h3 class="apple_sub-head">{{subhead}}</h3>
  <div class="apple_body">{{body}}</div>
</div>

An example of a module’s styling:


.apple {}

.apple_headline {
  font-size: 40px;
}

.apple_sub-head {
  font-size: 20px;
}

.apple_body {
  font-size: 14px;
  column-count: 2;
  color: #333;
}

Notice how each class is prefixed with the module’s name. This ensures that the styling for one component will never affect another; every module’s styling is encapsulated. Also, notice how we use just one class in our CSS selectors; this makes our component transportable. Ridding selectors of any ancestral context means that modules may be dropped anywhere in our application and will look the same. This is all imperative if we want to be able to reuse components throughout the application (and even across applications).

What If a Module Needs Interactions?

Each module (or fruit) has its own markup and style, which we wrote in such a way that it can be reused. But what if we need a module to respond to interactions or events? We need a way to bring the component to life, but still ensure that it is unbound from context so that it can be reused in different places. This is a little trickier that just writing smart markup and styling. To solve this problem, we wrote FruitMachine.

Reusable Components

FruitMachine is a lightweight library that assembles our layout’s components and enables us to declare interactions on a per-module basis. It was inspired by the simplicity of Backbone views, but with a little more structure to keep “boilerplate” code to a minimum. FruitMachine gives our team a consistent way to work with views, while at the same time remaining relatively unopinionated so that it can be used in almost any view.

The Component Mentality

Thinking about your application as a collection of standalone components changes the way you approach problems. Components need to be dumb; they can’t know anything of their context or of the consequences of any interactions that may occur within them. They can have a public API and should emit events when they are interacted with. An application-specific controller assembles each layout and is the brain behind everything. Its job is to create, control and listen to each component in the view.

For example, to show a popover when a component named “button” is clicked, we would not hardcode this logic into the button component. Instead “button” would emit a buttonclicked event on itself every time its button is clicked; the view controller would listen for this event and then show the popover. By working like this, we can create a large collection of components that can be reused in many different contexts. A view component may not have any application-specific dependencies if it is to be used across projects.

Working like this has simplified our architecture considerably. Breaking down our views into components and decoupling them from our application focuses our decision-making and moves us away from baking complex, heavily dependent modules into our application.

The Future of FruitMachine

FruitMachine was our solution to achieve fully transportable view components. It enables us to quickly define and assemble views with minimal effort. We are currently using FruitMachine only on the client, but server-side (NodeJS) usage has been considered throughout development. In the coming months, we hope to move towards producing server-side-rendered websites that progressively enhance into a rich app experience.

You can find out more about FruitMachine and check out some more examples in the public GitHub repository.

Retina Support

The Financial Times’ first Web app was released before the age of “Retina” screens. We retrofitted some high-resolution solutions, but never went the whole hog. For our designers, 100% Retina support was a must-have in the new application. We developers were sick of maintaining multiple sizes and resolutions of each tiny image within the UI, so a single vector-based solution seemed like the best approach. We ended up choosing icon fonts to replace our old PNGs, and because they are implemented just like any other custom font, they are really well supported. SVG graphics were considered, but after finding a lack of support in Android 2.3 and below, this option was ruled out. Plus, there is something nice about having all of your icons bundled up in a single file, whilst not sacrificing the individuality of each graphic (like sprites).

Our first move was to replace the Financial Times’ logo image with a single glyph in our own custom icon font. A font glyph may be any color and size, and it always looks super-sharp and is usually lighter in weight than the original image. Once we had proved it could work, we began replacing every UI image and icon with an icon font alternative. Now, the only pixel-based image in our CSS is the full-color logo on the splash screen. We used the powerful but rather archaic-looking FontForge to achieve this.

Once past the installation phase, you can open any font file in FontForge and individually change the vector shape of any character. We imported SVG vector shapes (created in Adobe Illustrator) into suitable character slots of our font and exported as WOFF and TTF font types. A combination of WOFF and TTF file formats are required to support iOS, Android and Windows devices, although we hope to rely only on WOFFs once Android gains support (plus, WOFFs are around 25% smaller in file size than TTFs).

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The Financial Times’ icon font in Font Forge

Images

Article images are crucial for user engagement. Our images are delivered as double-resolution JPEGs so that they look sharp on Retina screens. Our image service (running ImageMagick) outputs JPEGs at the lowest possible quality level without causing noticeable degradation (we use 35 for Retina devices and 70 for non-Retina). Scaling down retina size images in the browser enables us to reduce JPEG quality to a lower level than would otherwise be possible without compression artifacts becoming noticeable. This article explains this technique in more detail.

It’s worth noting that this technique does require the browser to work a little harder. In old browsers, the work of scaling down many large images could have a noticeable impact on performance, but we haven’t encountered any serious problems.

Native-Like Scrolling

Like almost any application, we require full-page and subcomponent scrolling in order to manage all of the content we want to show our users. On desktop, we can make use of the well-established overflow CSS property. When dealing with the mobile Web, this isn’t so straightforward. We require a single solution that provides a “momentum” scrolling experience across all of the devices we support.

overflow: scroll

The overflow: scroll declaration is becoming usable on the mobile Web. Android and iOS now support it, but only since Android 3.0 and iOS 5. IOS 5 came with the exciting new -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch property, which allows for native momentum-like scrolling in the browser. Both of these options have their limitations.

Standard overflow: scroll and overflow: auto don’t display scroll bars as users might expect, and they don’t have the momentum touch-scrolling feel that users have become accustomed to from their native apps. The -webkit-overflow-scrolling: touch declaration does add momentum scrolling and scroll bars, but it doesn’t allow developers to style the scroll bars in any way, and has limited support (iOS 5+ and Chrome on Android).

A Consistent Experience

Fragmented support and an inconsistent feel forced us to turn to JavaScript. Our first implementation used the TouchScroll library. This solution met our needs, but as our list of supported devices grew and as more complex scrolling interactions were required, working with it became trickier. TouchScroll lacks IE 10 support, and its API interface is difficult to work with. We also tried Scrollability and Zynga Scroller, neither of which have the features, performance or cross-browser capability we were looking for. Out of this problem, FTScroller was developed: a high-performance, momentum-scrolling library with support for iOS, Android, Playbook and IE 10.

FTScroller

FTScroller’s scrolling implementation is similar to TouchScroll’s, with a flexible API much like Zynga Scroller. We added some enhancements, such as CSS bezier curves for bouncing, requestAnimationFrame for smoother frame rates, and support for IE 10. The advantage of writing our own solution is that we could develop a product that exactly meets our requirements. When you know the code base inside out, fixing bugs and adding features is a lot simpler.

FTScroller is dead simple to use. Just pass in the element that will wrap the overflowing content, and FTScroller will implement horizontal or vertical scrolling as and when needed. Many other options may be declared in an object as the second argument, for more custom requirements. We use FTScroller throughout the Financial Times’ Web app for a consistent cross-platform scrolling experience.

A simple example:


var container = document.getElementById('scrollcontainer');
var scroller = new FTScroller(container);

The Gallery

The part of our application that holds and animates the page views is known as the “gallery.” It consists of three divisions: left, center and right. The page that is currently in view is located in the center pane. The previous page is positioned off screen in the left-hand pane, and the next page is positioned off screen in the right-hand pane. When the user swipes to the next page, we use CSS transitions to animate the three panes to the left, revealing the hidden right pane. When the transition has finished, the right pane becomes the center pane, and the far-left pane skips over to become the right pane. By using only three page containers, we keep the DOM light, while still creating the illusion of infinite pages.

Web
Infinite scrolling made possible with a three-pane gallery

Making It All Work Offline

Not many Web apps currently offer an offline experience, and there’s a good reason for that: implementing it is a bloody pain! The application cache (AppCache) at first glance appears to be the answer to all offline problems, but dig a little deeper and stuff gets nasty. Talks by Andrew Betts and Jake Archibald explain really well the problems you will encounter. Unfortunately, AppCache is currently the only way to achieve offline support, so we have to work around its many deficiencies.

Our approach to offline is to store as little in the AppCache as possible. We use it for fonts, the favicon and one or two UI images — things that we know will rarely or never need updating. Our JavaScript, CSS and templates live in LocalStorage. This approach gives us complete control over serving and updating the most crucial parts of our application. When the application starts, the bare minimum required to get the app up and running is sent down the wire, embedded in a single HTML page; we call this the preload.

We show a splash screen, and behind the scenes we make a request for the application’s full resources. This request returns a big JSON object containing our JavaScript, CSS and Mustache templates. We eval the JavaScript and inject the CSS into the DOM, and then the application launches. This “bootstrap” JSON is then stored in LocalStorage, ready to be used when the app is next started up.

On subsequent startups, we always use the JSON from LocalStorage and then check for resource updates in the background. If an update is found, we download the latest JSON object and replace the existing one in LocalStorage. Then, the next time the app starts, it launches with the new assets. If the app is launched offline, the startup process is the same, except that we cannot make the request for resource updates.

Images

Managing offline images is currently not as easy as it should be. Our image requests are run through a custom image loader and cached in the local database (IndexedDB or WebSQL) so that the images can be loaded when a network connection is not present. We never load images in the conventional way, otherwise they would break when users are offline.

Our image-loading process:

  1. The loader scans the page for image placeholders declared by a particular class.
  2. It takes the src attribute of each image placeholder found and requests the source from our JavaScript image-loader library.
  3. The local database is checked for each image. Failing that, a single HTTP request is made listing all missing images.
  4. A JSON array of Base64-encoded images is returned from the HTTP response and stored separately in the local database.
  5. A callback is fired for each image request, passing the Base64 string as an argument.
  6. An <img> element is created, and its src attribute is set to the Base64 data-URI string.
  7. The image is faded in.

I should also mention that we compress our Base64-encoded image strings in order to fit as many images in the database as possible. My colleague Andrew Betts goes into detail on how this can be achieved.

In some cases, we use this cool trick to handle images that fail to load:


<img src="image.jpg" onerror="this.style.display='none';" />

Ever-Evolving Applications

In order to stay competitive, a digital product needs to evolve, and as developers, we need to be prepared for this. When the request for a redesign landed at the Financial Times, we already had a fast, popular, feature-rich application, but it wasn’t built for change. At the time, we were able to implement small changes to features, but implementing anything big became a slow process and often introduced a lot of unrelated regressions.

Our application was drastically reworked to make the new requirements possible, and this took a lot of time. Having made this investment, we hope the new application not only meets (and even exceeds) the standard of the first product, but gives us a platform on which we can develop faster and more flexibly in the future.

(al)

© Wilson Page for Smashing Magazine, 2013.

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Features and Essays

Syrians in our minds…

Tomas Munita has done great work for the New York Times from over there… I can hardly imagine how difficult the conditions…

Tomas Munita: Fighting Intensifies in Syria (NYT) See also

Tomas Munita: A Day With the Arab League Monitors in Syria (NYT)

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Update Wednesday 8 February 2012:

Time Lightbox posted a slideshow this morning by Italian photographer Alessio Romenzi, on assignment for Time in Homs.  Rather than wait until next week, want to share the link to the work here…

Alessio Romenzi: Syria Under Siege (Lightbox)

++++++++++++

Antonio Bolfo’s NYPD: Impact on NYT Lens…Always loved this work… Saw it exhibited in Perpignan 2010…Definitely worth another look..

Antonio Bolfo: NYPD: Impact (NYT Lens)

Andrea Bruce from Kabul

Andrea Bruce: Children in Kabul (NYT)

Here’s Lauren Lancaster from Kabul too…Completely new photographer to me… See later in this post for Lancaster’s photos from GOP primary in Florida…posted on New Yorker’s Photo Booth

Lauren Lancaster: Youth in Kabul (Le Monde M Magazine)

GOP Primaries

Ricardo Cases from Florida on assignment for Time…Lightbox slideshow…

Plenty got printed in the magazine too…

Ricardo Cases: A Sunshine State of Mind for the Florida Primary (Lightbox)

Charles Ommanney: Newt Gingrich on the Florida Campaign Trail (Newsweek)

Charles Ommanney: US Presidential Campaign 2012 (Reportage by Getty Images)

Peter van Agtmael: On the Campaign Trail with Newt Gingrich (Lightbox)

Lauren Lancaster: Running in Florida (Photo Booth)

Massive Florida Primary gallery on NYT with photos by Heisler,Crowley,Yam,Litherland, Thayer, and Henry…

NYT (various photographers): The Florida Primary

To other issues… Here’s a link to Scottish photographer David Gillanders’  multimedia The Neglected…Finished sometime last year, but only discovered this last week…

David Gillanders: The Neglected : Street Children in Ukraine (Vimeo)

Pete Pin: The Cambodian Diaspora (Lightbox)

Sally Ryan: Black Jews of Chicago (zReportage)

Marvi Lacar: A ‘visual diary’ of depression (CNN photo blog)

Bruno Barbey: Istanbul (Magnum)

photo: Steve Liss

New Yorker (various photographers): American Poverty (Photo Booth)

Evgenia Arbugaeva: Siberian Memories (NYT Lens)

photo: Jason Andrew

Financial Times (Photos by Jason Andrew and Brandon Thibodeaux): Atheism in America (FT)

After reading Toni Greaves’ interview about her Radical Love series last week on BJP, I visited her website and ended taking a look also at the multimedia version of the project, which was posted on Time.com while back… Really enjoyed… Very good audio…

Toni Greaves: Radical Love: The Sisters of Summit, NJ (TIME)

Maija Tammi: Small Sizes and Great Love (Polka) multimedia

Lise Sarfati: She (Guardian)

Stephanie Sinclair: A Day with Warren Buffett (WSJ)

Denis Sinyakov: Moscow’s Migrant Workforce (Msnbc)

Veronique de Viguerie: With Libyan Arms, Mali Fighting Is Revived (NYT)

Adam Ferguson: Karen Rebels Remain Defiant (NYT) Myanmar

Brandon Thibodeaux: War Torn: An Iraq War Veteran’s Story (WSJ channel on Youtube) video

Andre Bruce: Leaving Iraq (NOOR)

Ayman Oghanna: Iraq (Polka)

Luis Carlos Barreto: Tropical Light (NYT Lens)

Lot of new features on Panos Pictures site….

Ivan Kashinsky: Guaranda Carnival (Panos)

Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky: Dance of the Devils (Panos) Gachet and Kashinsky are both represented by Panos, but they also have a common website at Runa Photos. See later in this post for their brand new iPad App…

Xavier Cervera: Revolucion o Muerte (Panos)

Stuart Freedman: The Englishman’s Eel (Panos)

Jason Larkin: Power to the People (Panos)

Sergey Maximishin: The Institute (Panos)

Dean Chapman: Fading Memories (Panos)

Mark Henley: The Vaults (The Atlantic)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Tahrir, 1 Year On (Reportage by Getty Images)

Nadia Shira Cohen: Egyptians (NYT Lens)

Ed Ou: Egyptian Youth (Reportage by Getty Images)

Alessandro Gandolfi: The Catacombs of Las Vegas (Parallelo Zero)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: The Last Nights at the Western Hotel (Lightbox)

Kadir van Lohuizen: Money, God, and Criminals (NOOR)

Liu Tao: Blood, Sweat, and Tears (zReportage)

Maciek Nabrdalik: Faith : Polish Catholicism (VII)

Adrian Fisk: Dilli Purani Dilli Naye (Foto8)

Reed Young: Brownsville (Lightbox)

Phil Moore: DRC Elections (Photographer’s website)

Peter Turnley: Cuba : A Grace of Spirit (Photgrapher’s website)

Michael Carlebach: South Florida (NYT Lens)

Jean-Marie Simon: Guatemala’s War Years (NYT Lens)

Bharat Choudhary: Young Muslims (NYT Lens)

Jordi Ruiz Cirera: The Mennonites of Bolivia (Foto8)

Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko: Grozny: Nine Cities  (PDN Photo of the Day)

David Dawson: Working with Lucian Freud (Lightbox)

Michael Tsegaye: Fighting Forgotten Tropical Diseases (BBC)

Thomas Hulton: The Lam Family of Ludlow Street (NYT Lens)

Espen Rasmussen: Transit (The Atlantic)

New Yorker (photos by Sylvia Plachy and Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao): Battle of Panoramas

Andrew Burton: Best of 2011 (Photographer’s website)

iPad Apps

Gerd Ludwig’s The Long Shadow of Chernobyl

Short Stories: From Ecuador to Tierra del Fuego by Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky

Polka Magazine iPad App

Interviews

Gina #12 Oakland, CA 2009, courtesy Brancolini Grimald  by Lise Sarfati

Lise Sarfati (Telephoto)

Lise Sarfati (Guardian) related: exhibition review

Steve Pyke on reviewing over 8,000 images for the World Press Award (PicBod)

Steve Pyke from the World Press Photo Award on fifteen hour days (PicBod)

World Press Photo:  Members of the jury share their perspectives on the winners and the judging process.

Ed Kashi (Bangkok Post)

Anthony Shadid (Mother Jones)

Doug Mills (NYT Lens)

Barton Silverman (NYT Lens)

James Whitlow Delano (Asiasociety)

Harry Hardie on Lynsey Addario & Tim Hetherington’s ‘In Afghanistan’ exhibition

Ed Ou (Wired Rawfile blog)

Venetia Dearden (e-photoreview)

Kael Alford (Vimeo)

Yunghi Kim (Tiffinbox)

Leo Maguire (BJP)

Guy Martin (Ideas Tap)

JB Russell (shootlove)

Elinor Carucci (PicBod)

Brett Ziegler (NYT Lens)

Articles

++++++++++++

Update 8 Wednesday 2012:

Just as I had finished the post yesterday, we got news that Magnum photographer Sergio Larrain has passed away.

Sergio Larrain (1931-2012)

photo: Rene Burri

Here’s a Slate slideshow celebrating Larrain’s work…

LONDON—Baker Street Station, 1959.

Slate: Sergio Larrain 1931-2012

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PDN: Swedish Journalists Endure Inhumane Conditions in Ethiopian Jail

Slate: Can Five Great Photographers Really Collaborate? | Postcards from America: A Magnum Collaboration

Lightbox: Postcards From America: The Box Set

photo: Nick Waplington

FT: Ways of Seeing

The Sacramento Bee: To our Readers: The Sacramento Bee fired longtime photographer Bryan Patrick

UNHCR: Nansen Award winner turns her lens on the Flowers of Afghanistan

BJP: The Photographers’ Gallery will reopen its London premises on 19 May with an exhibition of Edward Burtynsky’s Oil

Phaidon: Getting to know the face behind the photograph

BJP: Crowdfunding platform Emphas.is launches publishing arm

BJP: National Media Museum is set to start work on its London-based gallery

BJP: Firecracker Grant

BJP: Photographer wins copyright infringement case

NYT Mag 6th Floor blog: The Auckland Project

PDN: US Falls To #47 On Press Freedom Index, Thanks to Occupy Crackdowns

TIME Lightbox Tumblr: Joachim Ladefoged had only 8 minutes to photograph Messi

Allen Murabayash: Why I love Photography (PhotoShelter blog)

Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Lucy Nicholson | Related on Reuters photo blog

Dallas Morning News Photo blog: Big Miracle the movie – The story behind the real photo | How a photo from an almost botched Arctic assignment inspired a Drew Barrymore film

FT: Photographer Lise Sarfati studies the lives of teenagers and young women in America

Firecracker: February 2012 newsletter

The National Press Club: Attorney details backlash against photojournalists

Verve: Sam Phelps

Verve: Anne-Stine Johnsbåten

Verve: Rafael Fabrés

LA Times Framework blog: Six Photography Game Changers

PDN: Greenfield Wins Sundance Director Prize

BJP: Keeping the tabs: The best account management applications for photographers

New Yorker: Close Inspection: Magnum Contact Sheets (Photo Booth)

Mike David: Where’s the line on toning photos, especially for contests? (Mike Davis blog)

multiMedia 

new issue…. 7.7 : Documentary Photography Digital Magazine

Exhibitions

Labyrinth Photographic Printing : ‘A Year in Development’ Exhibition’ – 17th February – 1st March 2012 : London

Behind the Scenes of Steve McCurry’s Rome exhibition (Phaidon) video

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Justin Maxon

Magnum Emergency Fund Announces 2012 Grantees (Lightbox)

Aperture 2011 Portfolio Prize Finalists

Sony World Photography Awards 2012 Shortlist Announced | on BJP

PDN Annual

FotoEvidence : Book Award

Foam Talent call 2012 now open

Getty Images relaunches creative grants programme

Gordon Parks Photo Contest Deadline July 2

Agencies and Collectives

Magnum Photos : February 2012 newsletter

NOOR newsletter February 2012

Reportage by Getty Images: Peter Dench joins Reportage

Reportage by Getty Images: Introducing John D McHugh as a featured contributor

TerraProject Newsletter

Crowd funding

UK Uncensored by Peter Dench (Emphas.is)

Faded Tulips by William Daniels (Emphas.is) featured on Telephoto

Trading to Extinction by Patrick Brown (Emphas.is) Related on NYT Lens

Workshops

Visual Storytelling in an Open Society: workshop for Egyptian photographers : Deadline for applications is Sunday FEBRUARY 12, 2012 [link to info on Lightstalkers]

2012 Noor – Nikon Masterclass : South Africa | on BJP

MediaStorm multimedia storytelling workshop in London at the Frontline Club on February 20.

Jobs

Bloomberg: Staff Photo Editor – London

Photographers

Naomi Harris has a new website…

Naomi Harris

New website also by Stuart Freedman

Ricardo Cases

Eric Thayer

Eunice Adorno

Ivan Kashinsky

Ed Ou has added a multimedia section to his website…

Ed Ou : multimedia

Adrian Fisk

Jess Ingram

Jordi Ruiz Cicera

To finish off…. ‘War Photography and Weddings’. Ahem. That really is an interesting business card via @Kiehart

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Editor’s note: This post has been updated most recently on 1 May 2011. All the link additions can be found at the bottom of the post.

The world lost Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros in Libya yesterday, two not only great photojournalists, but based on tributes I have read,  two wonderful human beings. Both men were in their very early forties. Two other photographers, Guy Martin and Michael Christopher Brown were also injured by the blast that killed Hetherington and Hondros. Wednesday 20 April 2011 will remain as one of the darkest days in the history of photojournalism, along with 10 February 1971, the day when Larry Burrows, Henry Huet, Kent Potter, and Keisaburo Shimamoto were downed in Laos. I had never met either Tim Hetherington or Chris Hondros, but I had huge amount of respect and admiration for their work, not only the courage and willingness to put themselves in harm’s way  for their stories but especially for the compelling photographs they produced under the difficult and dangerous circumstances forever present in conflict situations. As soon as the terrible news were announced  during yesterday afternoon and evening,  countless tributes and memorials began flooding online on both sides of the Atlantic from both men’s friends and colleagues. I would like to show my own appreciation towards Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros by compiling here some of those mentioned tributes, as well links to some interviews and work of both the photojournalists. I would like to dedicate this post  to the memory of the two men and to their friends and family. My thoughts are with them at this very sad time. I can only imagine the pain felt by those who knew Tim and Chris personally.  I hope friends and family can find some solace in the fact that neither of them lived their lives in vain. Not only did both Hetherington and Hondros spend most of  their careers highlighting important issues  that would have otherwise been ignored or overlooked by the general public in countries such the UK and US, but they also practiced their craft at the very top tier of our industry to a very high standard and they were setting a mark towards which the rest of us should always strive for. Tim and Chris will be greatly missed.

Tim Hetherington 1970-2011

“My pictures were being used to illustrate others’ ideas, so I started making stories to express my own ideas about the world”  - Tim Hetherington

“My work is about trying to get us to understand that we are connected and trying to build bridges and understanding between people.”  - Tim Hetherington on Twitter August 27, 2010

Please take a moment to write a message to Tim Hetherington’s family and share it with his friends http://timhetherington.org/condolences/

Chris Hondros 1970-2011

Chris Hondros Guest Book

Funeral Services Announced For Chris Hondros

The initial news…

Articles – New York Times: ‘Restrepo’ Director and a Photographer Are Killed in Libya (NYT: April 2011)

Articles – BBC: Two photojournalists killed in Libyan city of Misrata (BBC: April 2011)

Articles – PDN: Tim Hetherington Killed In Libya (PDN: April 2011)

Articles – PDN: Chris Hondros Killed in Libya (PDN: April 2011)

“He was driven to make the most compelling images in some of the world’s most chaotic places. He strove to make a difference, to make people feel what he was seeing.” Los Angeles Times staff photographer Rick Loomis on Chris Hondros

Articles – LA Times: Photojournalists Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros killed in Libya (LAT Framework: April 2011)

Articles – BJP: Two photojournalists killed, others severely injured in Libya (BJP: April 2011)

Articles – MSNBC: Two photojournalists are killed and two others injured in rocket attack in Misrata (MSNBC: April 2011)

Articles – CPJ: Photojournalists Hetherington, Hondros dead in Libya (CPJ: April 2011)

Articles – Guardian: Documentary maker Tim Hetherington and photographer Chris Hondros killed (Guardian: April 2011)

Tributes and memorials…

Articles – NPPA: Tim Hetherington, Chris Hondros Killed In Libya (NPPA: April 2011)

Articles – Guardian: Tim Hetherington obituary (Guardian: April 2011)

“He knew what path he wanted to follow, his work was direct and purposeful and stood as an example to many of his proteges.”

Articles – Panos Pictures: Tim Hetherington 1970 – 2011 (Panos: April 2011)

Articles – BBC: Tim Hetherington: 1970 – 2011 (BBC: April 2011)

Blogs – CJ Chivers: Almost Dawn in Libya: Chris & Tim, Heading Home. (Writer’s blog: April 2011)

Articles – TIME: Tim Hetherington in Memoriam (TIME LB: April 2011)

Articles – TIME: Chris Hondros in Memoriam (TIME LB: April 2011)

Articles – NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Chris Hondros (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Articles – NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Tim Hetherington (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Articles – Wall Street Journal: Remembering Chris Hondros (WSJ: April 2011)

Articles – New Yorker Photo Booth: In Memoriam: Tim Hetherington (New Yorker: April 2011)

Articles – Sue Turton (Al Jazeera): Remembering Tim Hetherington (Al Jazeera: April 2011)

Blogs – FotoBoogie: Tim Hetherington gone but never forgotten 

Blogs – Fred Ritchin: Tim Hetherington, a casualty of war 

Blogs – Michael Grieve: The integrity of Tim Hetherington

Blogs – David Alan Harvey: only the good die young..

Blogs – Kenneth Jarecke: For What’s It’s Worth

Blogs – Vincent Laforet: 2 Great photographers lost today in Libya – doing what they loved to do. (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

Blogs – Andrew Hetherington: Dear Tim (WTJ: April 2011)

Blogs – Pete Kiehart: Chris and Tim

Articles – Dana Stevens (Slate): Tim Hetherington’s Diary (Slate: April 2011)

Articles – Peter Bradshaw: Tim Hetherington: a brilliant journalist and a courageous, radical film-maker (Guardian: April 2011)

Articles – Xan Brooks: Tim Hetherington: one of the finest photojournalists on the planet (Guardian: April 2011)

Articles - Sebastian Junger:  Tim Hetherington (Vanity Fair: April 2011)

NYT Mag DoP Kathy Ryan’s tribute to Tim…

Articles – Kathy Ryan: Remembering Tim Hetherington (6thfloor blog NYT: April 2011)

“Tim died in pursuit of a story for us” – David Campbell

Articles – David Campbell: Post-photography: Tim Hetherington’s living legacy (DC blog: April 2011)

“Without Chris, Tim, and other photojournalists like them, the truth about the horrors of war can easily be hidden. Dismissed. Accepted.” – Andrea Bruce

Articles – Andrea Bruce: Chris Hondros : A Photojournalist Remembered (NPR: April 2011)

Articles – Craydon Carter (Vanity Fair): A Loss in the Family: Tim Hetherington 1970-2011 (VF: April 2011)

Articles – Sebastian Doggart: Tim Hetherington: A hero’s journey (Telegraph: April 2011)

Articles – Channel4 (UK): Tim Hetherington : a Tribute (Channel4: April 2011)

Articles – Life: Chris Hondros in Memoriam (Life.com: April 2011)

Articles – Getty Images blog: Chris Hondros, friend and colleague (Getty blog: April 2011)

Articles – Life: Remembering Tim Hetherington (Life.com: April 2011)

Articles – Doctors Without Borders: In Memoriam: Chris Hondros (Doctors without Borders: April 2011)

InterviewsSebastian Junger on Tim Hetherington (ABC News: April 2011)

Articles – ABC News: A Filmmaker Tim Hetherington’s Last Message (ABC News: April 2011)

““The news that Chris Hondros was killed in Misurata is a gut punch to so many people, for so many reasons, both because he was so young, so talented, and perhaps most of all because he was so fearless. It is impossible to imagine him doing anything but the work he loved doing. The world is a more enlightened and more aware place today because Chris Hondros felt such a profound responsibility to brave war zones in order to share the truth in poignant images with the rest of the world.” – John Kerry

“Everything about him — his passion, his sense of purpose, and his spirit — gave meaning to the word `photojournalist.” – John Kerry

Articles – Boston Globe: John Kerry recalls photographer Chris Hondros killed in Libya (Boston Globe: April 2011)

We should never forget how dangerous it is to cover conflicts…

Articles – Roger Tooth: ‘Photographers have to be near the action. Sometimes too near’ (Guardian: April 2011) Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros were killed while shooting the war in Libya. The Guardian head of photography explains the unique challenge of war photojournalism

Articles – NPR: The Toll of Covering Conflicts (NPR: April 2011)

Articles – Sean Smith: War photographers are not addicted to danger (Guardian: April 2011)

Articles – Boston Globe Big Picture: Photographers in Peril (Boston Globe: April 2011)

Articles – NPR: War Photographers Joao Silva and Greg Marinovich on their injuries,ethics (NPR: April 2011)

Articles – Scott Strazzante: On life and loss, death and photojournalism (Chicago Tribune: April 2011)

Articles - Daily Beast: Libya War Photographers’ Final Hours (DB: April 2011)

Some debate going on regarding if the news were appropriate to be broken on social media first…

Articles – Teru Kuwayama: Notifying Next of Kin in the Age of Facebook (PBS: April 2011)

Articles – Wired Rawfile blog: Journalists Killed in Libya, News Breaks on Facebook (Raw File: April 2011)

Some interviews with Tim and Chris…

InterviewsTim Hetherington’s Last Interview (Outsideonline.com: 2011)

InterviewsTim Hetherington : The fault lines of West Africa (Frontline Club: 2009)

InterviewsTim Hetherington (PBS video from 2009 on on A Photo Editor blog)

Essential reading…

InterviewsTim Hetherington : By Any Means Necessary (Foto8: 2008)

InterviewsTim Hetherington and Gary Knight discuss war photography (Dispatches)

InterviewsChris Hondros (Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago blog: 2011)

InterviewsChris Hondros : Me and Joseph Duo (Digital Journalist: 2005)

InterviewsChris Hondros : Life Behind the Lens (MSNBC)

Some Tim Hetherington interviews from the PJ Links archive…

Hetherington, Tim (BBC: October 2010)

Hetherington, Tim (Guernica: September 2010)

Hetherington, Tim talks about his documentary Restrepo (NPR: June 2010)

“If you are interested in mass communication, then you have to stop thinking of yourself as a photographer. We live in a post-photographic world. If you are interested in photography, then you are interested in something — in terms of mass communication — that is past. I am interested in reaching as many people as possible.” – Tim Hetherington

Hetherington, Tim (NYT Lens: June 2010)

Hetherington Tim (video) (VF: December 2007) Pushing back the Taliban and al-Qaeda in Afghanistan’s strategically crucial Korengal Valley is one of the U.S. Army’s deadliest challenges. For “Into the Valley of Death” (January 2008), Sebastian Junger dug in with the men of Second Platoon, whose humor, courage, and camaraderie come under daily fire. In this video, which features battlefront footage shot by Junger and photographer Tim Hetherington for ABC News, Junger and Hetherington talk about their experiences in Afghanistan while working on the story.

Hetherington, Tim on his Liberia project (BBC: 2009)

Hetherington, Tim at NYPH (video c. 45 minutes) (What’s the Jackanory: May 2009)

Their work…

The photojournalism community is in shock today, but we can take some comfort in knowing that both men died doing what they most loved. We can celebrate and applaud their lives’ work and achievements.

Tim’s website

Chris’ website

Features and Essays – NYT: Chris Hondros, at Work in Libya (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Features and Essays - MSNBC: Photojournalist Chris Hondros  tribute slideshow (MSNBC: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Guardian: Chris Hondros – a retrospective in pictures (Guardian: April 2011)

Features and Essays – BBC: Chris Hondros in Libya: The last photographs (BBC: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Chris Hondros: Baghdad in D Minor (NYT Lens: 2010)

Some Chris Hondros features from the PJ Links archive…

101st Airborne in Afghanistan (Newsnet5.com: October 2010)

Firefight in Afghanistan (Montreal Gazette: July 2010) Hondros NYT Lens

Afghanistan, seen through a Humvee window (MSNBC: June 2010)

My window onto Kandahar (Tampabay.com: June 2010) M-ATV vehicle in Kandahar, Afghanistan

Features and Essays – Guardians: Tim Hetherington – a retrospective in pictures (Guardian: April 2011)

Features and EssaysTim Hetherington’s photographs (MSNBC: April 2011)

Features and Essays – Vanity Fair: Tim Hetherington: A Vanity Fair Portfolio (VF: April 2011)

Videos – Tim Hetherington: Diary (Photographer’s Vimeo: 2010)

Videos – Tim Hetherington: Sleeping Soldiers (Photographer’s Vimeo: 2009)

Videos - Tim Hetherington: Healing Sport (The Photography Channel)

Some Tim Hetherington features from the PJ Links archive…

Infidel (NYT Lens: October 2010) A Family Album: American Soldiers at War

Restrepo (Visura: August 2010)

Death Valley Days article (NYT: June 2010) About Restrepo documentary

Tim Hetherington : In focus (New Yorker: April 2010)

As mentioned at the start of this post, two other photographers, Guy Martin and Michael Christopher Brown, were also injured by the same blast that killed Tim and Chris. Guy Martin’s injuries were serious. I wish him safest of recoveries.

MSNBC: Doctor: Two Western photographers recovering in Misrata

Articles – PDN: Guy Martin Critical But Stable (PDN: April 2011)

Articles – BJP: Injured British photographer in serious, but stable condition (BJP: April 2011)

Articles – Huck: Photographer Guy Martin seriously injured (Huck Magazine: April 2011)

Friday 22 April Update:

Lens blog have just put up a piece about Guy Martin…

Articles – NYT Lens: At 27, Guy Martin Becomes a Veteran (NYT Lens: April 2011)

Saturday 23 April Update:

New York Magazine: Shooters: The City’s War Photographers Mourn Two of Their Own (NY Mag: April 2011)

James Rainey: The deaths in Libya of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros hit home with their fellow photojournalists. (LAT: April 2011)

David Schonauer: The Risky History of the War Photographer (Monroe Gallery blog: April 2011)

Michael Kamber: A Group of Conflict Photographers Runs Out of Luck (NYT: April 2011)

Greg Campbell:  Chris Hondros, RIP (Salon: April 2011) How my best friend died in a combat zone

NYT At War blog:  Service Held for Combat Photographers and Doctor Killed in Misurata (NYT: April 2011)

Photojournalists embark on final journey home (Storyful.com: April 2011)

Al Jazeera: Ajdabiya honours fallen British photojournalist (Al Jazeera: April 2011)

Wall Street Journal: A look at the NYC photojournalism community in the wake of this weeks tragedies (WSJ: April 2011)

“As those close to him knew, Tim was preparing to apply to Magnum this June, while we were preparing to welcome him into our family. Many of us will now always feel there is an empty chair with his name on it during our gatherings.” – Jonas Bendiksen

Magnum Photos: Remembering Tim Hetherington & Chris Hondros (Magnum: April 2011)

Peter van Agtmael: Testimony from a Colleague: Looking Back at Tim Hetherington’s Liberia (TIME LB: April 2011)

Nic Bothma: Tribute to Chris Hondros, who ventured far with his torch (CPJ: April 2011)

Andrew Burton: Hetherington and Hondros, In Memoriam (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

Amanda Rivkin: Tumbling through Chris Hondros’ Getty Archive (Photographer’s Tumblr: April 2011)

Guardian have put up a slideshow of some of Guy Martin’s work…

Guardian: Photographer Guy Martin capturing the conflict in Libya : in pictures (Guardian: April 2011)

Sunday 24 April Update:

Brian Till: “The Bang Bang Club,” Tim Hetherington, and Bearing Witness (The Atlantic: April 2011)

Boston Globe Big Picture blog: Photojournalist Chris Hondros: At Work in Misurata, Libya (Boston Globe: April 2011)

TIME - Libyan Rebels Dedicate Town Square to Journalist Tim Hetherington (TIME: April 2011)

Amanda Rivkin: In Memoriam: Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington (Photographer’s blog: April 2011)

InterviewsGreg Marinovich talks about conflict photojournalism, The Bang Bang Club (Daily Beast: April 2011)

NY service for Chris Hondros Wednesday 27 April at 1 pm Sacred Hearts St. Stephens Church 125 Summit St. Brooklyn

Monday 25 April update:

BBC World Service: From Our Own Correspondent:  Stuart Hughes reflects on the risks of reporting wars (BBC: April 2011)

Newsweek: The Last Witnesses (Newsweek: April 2011) War photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros

Charles Glass: Photographers: The First Casualties of War (Takimag.com: April 2011)

NPPA: Funeral Services Announced For Chris Hondros 

Matt Lutton: The Chris Hondros photograph that changed me (dvafoto: April 2011)

John Louis Lucaites: Of Totems and Taboos (No Caption Needed: April 2011)

Tuesday 26 April Update:

David Carr: War, in Life and Death (NYT: April 2011) Carr on Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros

Michael Ware : To Talk With Ghosts (Newsweek: April 2011) Ware on the Pain of War Reporting

Bagnewsnotes: Remembering Chris Hondros, Part I (BNN: April 2011)

Chris Hondros’ memorial service will be streamed live here Wednesday 1pm EST.

Thursday 28 April Update: 

Barrie Peach Special Envoy’s Mission, Benghazi: In Memory of Tim Hetherington (FCO.gov.uk: April 2011)

NPPA: London Funeral For Tim Hetherington In May (NPPA: April 2011)

NPPA: Chris Hondros Remembered As A “Prophetic Humanist” (NPPA: April 2011)

Lucy Davies: Tim Hetherington: a tribute (Telegraph: April 2011)

Todd Heisler: Chris Hondros in New York (NYT Lens: April 2011)

BagNewsNotes: Remembering Chris Hondros, Part II (BNN: April 2011)

Amy Yenkin: Remembering Tim Hetherington (Open Society: April 2011)

Christina Larson: In Memoriam, Chris Hondros (Foreign Policy: April 2011)

Saturday 30 April 2011 Update:

Peter Bouckaert: The Vulture Club Tim Hetherington was a member of a special, close-knit brotherhood: people who work in war zones. (Foreign Policy: April 2011)

BagNewsNotes: Remembering Chris Hondros, Part III: Tal Afar (BNN: April 2011)

Getty Images: Fiancée of Getty Images Photographer Chris Hondros Announces Fund to Aid Photojournalists   April 28, 2011 – The fiancée of Chris Hondros, the award-winning Getty Images photographer killed on April 20 in an attack by government forces in Misrata, Libya, has announced the formation of The Chris Hondros Fund, which will encourage and assist aspiring photojournalists, aid photojournalists and other journalists in conflict zones and raise awareness of issues surrounding their work.   Christina Piaia, who was engaged to Mr. Hondros, announced that contributions could be made by check to The Chris Hondros Fund, c/o Getty Images, 75 Varick St., 5th Floor, New York, NY 10013.   “Chris devoted his life to bringing the hardships of conflicts from Kosovo to Liberia to Afghanistan to Iraq into the public eye,” said Ms. Piaia. “We are setting up this fund to honor Chris’ memory, protect his colleagues in war-torn areas, and help aspiring journalists and photographers cover these events.”   Please direct requests for information to Jim Rosenfeld at Davis Wright Tremaine, LLP, 1633 Broadway, 27th Floor | New York, NY 10019; Tel: (212) 603-6455; Fax: (212) 489-8340; Email: jamesrosenfeld@dwt.com.

1 May 2011 Update: 

Max Hastings: Death or Glory (Financial Times: April 2011)

Régis Le Sommier: My Footsteps in Your Footsteps (Paris Match: April 2011)

Washington Post: Style writer Dan Zak reflects on collaborating with photographers (WP: April 2011)

Olivier Laurent: Remembering Chris Hondros (BJP: April 2011)

Donald R. Winslow: Chris Hondros Remembered As A “Prophetic Humanist” (NPPA: April 2011

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Your arm-chair photojournalist is back… That’s what I feel like anyway at the moment…

I moved house in Brighton a week ago, and still haven’t got internet set up in the new place, so I’ve had to frequent cafes for free wi-fi….. Sitting at Redwood cafe (nice strong Americanos, just as I like them) in the city centre….Anyways, no updates since Thursday, so loads to share….

Let’s start with Egypt….

Dominic Nahr is covering the anti-government protests in Cairo for TIME magazine…. @Panospictures tweeted at some point yesterday that Nahr and Guy Martin, who is covering the events for Wall Street Journal, might have had their memory cards confiscated by the army, but it would seem that not all of them , since Nahr managed to file anyway…

Features and Essays – Dominic Nahr: Turmoil in Egypt (TIME: January 2011)

New York Times has a Egypt gallery up that they are updating daily….the below photo by Chris Hondros shows travellers at Cairo International Airport waiting for flights out of the country…. Which of course is opposite to a lot of photographers, who are trying hard to make their way to the country…Based on Twitter and Facebook messages, a whole lot of freelancers seem to be heading there…

Features and Essays – New York Times (various photographers): Egypt Protest (February 2011)

Guardian’s Egypt gallery…

Features and Essays – Guardian: Egypt Protests Continue (Guardian: January 2011)

VII Photo put up a piece on their magazine of Egypt under Mubarak.

Features and Essays – VII: Egypt Under Mubarak (VII Magazine: January 2011)

Anastasia Taylor- Lind’s Egypt bloggers series, which she shot for Geo Germany last year (see blog), has caught second wind during the current anti-goverment protests, and it has been exhibited both on MSNBC’s and Newsweek’s websites…

Features and Essays - Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Egyptian bloggers ( Newsweek: January 2011) series on MSNBC

Anastasia is the featured photographer of the month on Firecracker, by the way….Firecracker is a site supporting European women photographers…

Ed Ou, who is covering the Egypt unrest for NYT, has been interviewed by James Estrin on the Lens blog…

Interviews - Ed Ou (NYT Lens: January 2011) Egypt

I didn’t manage to listen to this, but according to @anastasiatl, Ivor Prickett was interviewed on Tahrir Square for Irish Radio (part 2 , 3m 55sec in)…

Interviews - Ivor Prickett (Newstalk.ie: January 2011)

Phillip Toledano’s new work…

Features and Essays – Phil Toledano: Kim Jong Phil (Project website: 2011)

Stephen Alvarez’s (@alvarez photo) National Geographic Magazine February 2011 cover story, Paris Underground, was featured on NPR…he put a video on this blog…

Features and Essays - Stephen Alvarez: Paris Underground (Photographer’s blog: January 2011) Read the NPR article here

Financial Times picture desk, Emma Bowkett and co, sent a pretty impressive line up of 10 photographers to cover the new period of economic austerity… There’s Parr, Roberts, Norfolk…Winship…. (found via @Yumi_Goto)

NB. You might need to register to view the link… Free registration is enough though….

Features and Essays – Financial Times (various photographers): Britain: what lies ahead? (FT: January 2011)

Features and Essays – Jeremy Cowart: Haiti by iPhone (Photographer’s website) his Twitter

Features and Essays - Keith Bedford: Hoarding Cotton (WSJ: January 2011)

Features and Essays - Kevin Frayer: Helmand Province from above (SacBee Frame: January 2011)

Features and Essays - M. Scott Brauer: We Chinese (Project website: January 2011)

Simon Wheatley was a huge inspiration to me when I was studying photojournalism, and he still is…

Books / Features and Essays - Simon Wheatley: Don’t Call Me Urban (Project website)

Features and Essays - Marco Salustro: Jasmine Revolution (Corbis Stock: January 2011) Tunisia | Salustro’s website

Features and Essays – Julien Goldstein: Belarus (Photographer’s website: 2011)

Interviews - Alex Webb & Rebecca Norris Webb Q&A (Telegraph: January 2011)

InterviewsThe Archive of Modern Conflict (PhotoEye blog: January 2011)

InterviewsDavid Goldblatt (PDF) Interview with South African photographer David Goldblatt about cultural amnesia.

Articles -NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Lucas Mebrouk Dolega, 32 (NYT Lens: January 2011)

Articles – BJP: Photographer Danfung Dennis wins two Sundance documentary prizes (BJP: January 2011)

Great BJP series continues…

Articles / Tutorials – BJP: 11 Tips for 2011: How to get new clients (BJP: January 2011)

Articles / Tutorials – BJP: 11 Tips for 2011: Ditch that website altogether (BJP: January 2011)

Articles / Tutorials – BJP: 11 Tips for 2011: Refreshing your portfolio (BJP: January 2011)

Articles – Guardian: Greenslade blog: News agencies in peril as freelance rates get smaller (Guardian: January 2011)

Articles - David Campbell: The problem with regarding the photography of suffering as ‘pornography’ (Writer’s blog: January 2011)

About time, people are talking more about this…Blake Andrews on the lack of a happy face in current portraiture…

Blogs/ Articles – Blake Andrews: Portraits : The Space Test (Blake Andews’ blog: January 2011)

Peter Dench has his own Diary on the pages of Professional Photographer magazine…Definitely worth reading…Honest and funny…

Articles – Peter Dench: The Dench Diary : November 2010 / October 2010 (Professional Photographer: 2010)

Articles - Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Dan Kitwood (Guardian: January 2011)

@AGarciaPhoto: What would you do if someone stuck a wad of $100 bills in your pocket for photos of a Chinese president while on assignment?

Blogs – Trib Photo Nation: The saga of an individual assignment (Chicago Tribune: 2011)

Blogs - Brendan Hoffman: State of the Union for the New York Times (Prime Collective blog: January 2011)

VideosAlec Soth: Birth of an Exhibit (Vimeo: 2010)

Saw this on a Benjamin Rasmussen (@benjaminras) tweet…

Videos - Simon Norfolk on Photojournalism (Youtube)

Videos - In-Sight trailer (Nick Turpin’s blog: January 2011)

Vivian Maier is everywhere….

Articles - CBS: Vivian Maier: Photographer’s Talent Went Unknown Until Death (CBS: January 2011)

Saw David Campbell (@davidc7) tweet this….

Aaron Huey is developing his important Lakota work in collaboration with Ernesto Yerena and Shepard Fairey (Aaron Huey blog: January 2011)

Collectives - Paralaxis

BlogsPontus Hook

Twitter - Benedicte Kurzen

Awards/ ExhibitionsHearst 8×10 winners

Talks - Open- i: Photoblogs Right Here Right Now Seminar - FORMAT International Photography festival, Derby UK 15.00 GMT

Jobs - Slate is looking for a photo researcher (Slate)

And to finish off, a joke…

“Mubarak is very ill. Doctor says, “you must prepare message to say goodbye to people”. Mubarak asks: “why?where are people going?”"

from @peterbeaumont

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Brilliant street photography in NYT Lens by Matt Stuart yesterday…

Features and Essays - Matt Stuart: London, Very Dry, With a Twist (NYT Lens: November 2010)

Stuart’s website

Just in….

NEWS – World Press Photo 2011 Jury : “Nineteen recognized professionals in the field of press photography worldwide will judge the entries at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam from 29 January until 10 February 2011.”

Some ‘polaroid’ work on the Reuters Full Focus blog…. Jim Young hasn’t gone the iPhone route as a lot of photographers lately, but chose the Fuji Instax as his tool…

Features and Essays - Jim Young: Presidential Polaroids (Reuters Full Focus blog: November 2010)

US mid-term elections coming up…Suau and Miller on TIME

Features and Essays - Anthony Suau: Scenes from the Stewart Colbert Rally (TIME: November 2010)

Features and Essays - Greg Miller: The Poll Workers (TIME: October 2010) The men and women charged with ensuring the integrity of the voting process

Features and Essays - Sven Torfinn: Proposed Road in Serengeti National Park (NYT: October 2010) Tanzania

Magnum Photos is now selling photos from Paolo Pellegrin’s first NatGeo assignment, Waters Wars,  published in National Geographic  Magazine in April this year…and which was also shown on NYT Lens and NPR Pictureshow… still worth checking this one out, as there are images which weren’t included on the three previous platforms…

Features and Essays – Paolo Pellegrin: Waters Wars (Magnum: 2010)

Features and Essays – Hossein Fatemi: The Surge (Panos: October 2010) Afghanistan

Features and Essays – Steve Pyke: Philosophers | article (NYT: October 2010)

InterviewsJR : Ted Prize (Ted: 2010)

Interviews - Christopher Morris : Mr President (VII Magazine: October 2010)

InterviewsAnastasia Taylor-Lind (Digital Photo Pro: 2010)

InterviewsLiz Hingley : A journey through Soho Road (Telegraph: October 2010)

I only recently discovered  - after having worked for the FT myself –  that the paper has a really good Life and Arts section on Saturday’s… The FT Magazine is great too…

Articles – Financial Times: Photographer Larry Clark’s muses (FT: October 2010)

TwitterGideon Mendel

Check this out!

EquipmentBlast Boxers

As a final note… 30,524 views in October… Thank you!

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Just saw this on Twitter….awful news from Afghanistan… New York Times is reporting today that Joao Silva has been severely injured after having stepped on a landmine.

Articles – NYT: Times Photographer Wounded in Afghanistan (NYT: October 2010)

The news on BJP

Silva’s personal website

Features and Essays – John Moore: In American Custody (NYT Lens: October 2010)

Features and Essays - Chris Hondros: 101st Airborne in Afghanistan (Newsnet5.com: October 2010)

Photographers -Krisanne Johnson

PhotographersMarc Vallee

TwitterSusana Raab

Some of my own work…Two photographs I took of Magnum photographer Martin Parr in Isle of Wight  four weeks ago are published today in the  Financial Times along with an article ‘Life through a lens’ written by Catherine Nixey, in the Life & Arts section… Online you can only see one of the photos, and it’s quite heavily cropped, but I’m glad they printed it in full on the paper…Check the FT Weekend in print for the entire article and the other photograph…

Articles – Financial Times : Catherine Nixey: On holiday with Martin Parr (FT: October 2010)

A bit of Saturday fun…I got myself that iPhone two weeks ago, and I’ve enjoyed taking some snaps with it…

Blogs - 10 Of The Best Photo Apps for iPhone (Triphp Blog: 2010)

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