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French photojournalist Rémi Ochlik, who was killed Wednesday in Homs, Syria, won first place in the General News category for the 2012 World Press Photo competition for his photo story, “Battle for Libya.” Take a look back over his photography from Haiti in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake there. (All images credit Rémi Ochlik/Imago/Zuma Press unless specified. All images taken in November 2010 unless specified.)


A view of the Aviation refugee camp in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in November 2010, as cholera raged throughout refugee camps across the country.


A young person is cared for at a cholera-treatment center in Haiti.


A woman prays in a cholera treatment camp.


A child plays in Port-au-Prince’s Cite Soleil slum.


Cyclists in Cap Hatien pass burning tires set ablaze by locals angry at U.N. peacekeepers, whom they blame for the outbreak of cholera.


Roadblocks are set up around Cap Hatien by angry protesters.


People gather in the street of Cap Hatien to protest the U.N. presence.


A coffin in the streets of Cap Hatien.


At sunrise in Aviation Refugee Camp, a child emerges from a makeshift shower in an abandoned helicopter.


Brazilian soldiers with the United Nations peacekeeping force patrol the Cite Soleil slum.


A view of U.N. peacekeepers on patrol in Cite Soleil.


Supporters of presidential candidate Jude Celestin rally at the Carrefour airport.


Presidential candidate Michal Martelly rallies supporters in Port-au-Prince.


Police arrest two men they say were involved in a knife fight on the sidelines of a political rally.


Another view of the arrests at the political rally.


Martelly supporters at a rally in Port-au-Prince.


Supporters of Mirlande Manigat, the only female candidate in the Haitian presidential election, attend a musical rally in Port-au-Prince.


Manigat supporters shout their approval.


Haitian police check bystanders for weapons during a patrol around the Cite Soleil slum and Aviation refugee camp in December 2010.


A woman suffering from cholera arrives via wheelbarrow at a Doctors Without Borders hospital in Port-au-Prince in November 2010.


Rémi Ochlik in an undated photo. (Lucas Mebrouk Dolega/AFP/Getty Images)

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Rémi Ochlik, an award-winning French photojournalist, was just 29 when he died on Feb. 22, when government forces shelled a building where a growing number of foreign journalists were covering the battle in Homs, Syria. Ochlik died alongside Marie Colvin, an American who was one of Britain’s most honored combat reporters. Two other journalists were reportedly wounded in the barrage.

For Ochlik the horror in Syria came as he was just beginning his career. He was with his friend Lucas Dolego, a French photographer, on the streets of Tunis during the revolution there in January 2011 when Dolego was hit and killed by a police teargas canister. “We had come to work, so I kept on working,” he said in a recent interview, after being honored for his Arab Spring photos. “As a little boy I always wanted to become an archeologist, for the travels, the adventures,” he continued. That changed when his grandfather gave him his first camera.

Lucas Dolega—Polaris

Oct. 23, 2011. French photojournalist Remi Ochlik in Misrata, Libya. Ochlik was killed Feb. 22, 2012, by Syrian shelling of the opposition stronghold Homs.

In 2004, Ochlik traveled to Haiti and photographed the fall of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, winning the Francois Chalais Award for Young Reporters. He started his own agency, IP3 press, which specialized in combat photography, he covered the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2008 and he returned to Haiti for a cholera epidemic in 2010. In 2011, Ochlik covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya; his work in Libya won him first prize in the General News category of the World Press Photo contest. One of the World Press judges said that his submission told a complete story.

“The idea was not to focus on just one part of the story,” Ochlik told the British Journal of Photography. “Because when you look at what happened, this war was divided in several parts—in Benghazi, in Misrata—and in what I’ve covered, I’ve tried to tell a story.”

Ochlik’s own story took him to Syria merely a week before he was killed. His and Colvin’s deaths came the same week that Anthony Shadid, a renowned foreign correspondent, died of an apparent asthma attack while sneaking out of the country where he had been reporting. Despite his young age, Ochlik understood the risks in his chosen profession. In describing his work in Haiti when he was only 20 years old, he said, “I could sense the danger, but it was where I always dreamt to be, in the action.” His being there allowed the world to witness horrifying atrocities, but it ended the life of a gifted storyteller when his own adventure had barely begun.

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World Press Photo, a non-profit organization based in the Netherlands, recently announced the winners of its 2012 photojournalism contest. More than 5,000 photographers from 124 countries submitted over 100,000 pictures to the competition. Top honors this year went to Samuel Aranda for his image of a woman holding a wounded relative during protests in Yemen. The prize-winning photographs will be assembled into an exhibition that will travel to 45 countries over the next year. Below is just a sample of this year's group of winners -- please visit the World Press Photo website to see them all. (See also the winners from 2011.) [32 photos]

First prize winner in the Spot News Singles category of the 2012 World Press Photo Contest, this photo by by Yuri Kozyrev, Noor Images for Time, shows rebels in Ras Lanuf, Libya, on March 11, 2011. (AP Photo/Yuri Kozyrev, Noor Images for Time)

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