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Original author: 
Mikko Takkunen

Features and Essays

Lucas Jackson / Reuters

Lucas Jackson / Reuters

Lucas Jackson: Haunting Night Scenes of Oklahoma’s Devastation (ABC News) Reuters photographer Lucas Jackson traveled to Moore and used the twilight night sky to illuminate some haunting landscapes the tornado left behind.

Katie Hayes Luke: Faces And Places The Tornado Left Behind (NPR Picture Show)

Ashley Gilbertson: Intricate Rituals for Fallen American Troops (NYT)

Steve Ruark: Honoring the Fallen (LightBox) One Photographer’s Witness to 490 Dignified Transfers

Luke Sharrett: Sacrifices Set in Adorned Stone (NYT Lens) Gravestones at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

Sergey Ponomarev: A Supporting Role (NYT) In Afghan Transition, U.S. Forces Take a Step Back

Andrew Burton: Afghanistan (CNN Photo blog) Photographing ‘my generation’ at war

Eugene Richards: Inside Guantanamo (LightBox)

Ilona Szwarc

Ilona Szwarc

Ilona Szwarc: The Little Cowgirls (Telegraph) Deep in the heart of Texas, young girls are bucking the trend and breaking into the traditionally macho world of rodeo. The photographer Ilona Szwarc has corralled some of these junior ropers and riders into a compelling visual essay | Related article here

Aaron Huey: Pine Ridge (LightBox) Aaron Huey has photographed the Oglala Lakota for seven years on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

Ilona Szwarc: American Girls (Photo Booth)

Andrew Moore: Stuck in the Shadow of Affluence (NYT Magazine) How the epidemic of empty, foreclosed homes in Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods ignited a new form of guerrilla activism.

Justin Maxon: Gunland (LightBox) Chicago’s South Side

Billie Mandle: Reconciliation (Wired Raw File photo blog) American confessionals and reconciliation rooms

Christopher Anderson: Skin on Parade in Central Park (NY Magazine) New York Magazine sent photographer Christopher Anderson to meander around Central Park on a 79-degree day

Charles Ommanney: Heavy Metal Cruise (Reportage by Getty Images)

Anderson Scott: Civil War Lovers Can’t Leave the Past Behind at Awkward Reenactments (Wires Raw File)

Arne Svenson: The Neighbors (Photo Booth)

Martin Parr: Life’s a Beach / USA Color (Slate Behold)

Joshua Yospyn: America’s Quirky Coincidences (NYT Lens)

Saul Robbins: Behind Closed Doors at New York Shrink Offices (Slate Behold)

Ruth Prieto: Safe Heaven (burn magazine)  The second chapter of a documentary project about Mexican immigrant women in New York.

Lynsey Addario / VII for TIME

Lynsey Addario / VII for TIME

Lynsey Addario: Rich Nation, Poor People (LightBox) With its vast oil wealth, Saudi Arabia has one of the highest concentrations of super rich households in the world. But an estimated 20 percent of the population, if not more, lives in crippling poverty.  

Kiana Hayeri: Young Iranian Immigrants (NYT Lens) Leaving Tehran and Restraints Behind

Carolyn Drake: Two Rivers: A Journey Through Central Asia (Photo Booth) A photographic record of the area in Central Asia that follows the Amu Darya and the Syr Darya, the region’s major rivers.

Linda Forsell: Refugee Crisis (zReportage) Syria | Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp is home to 170,000 people from Syria who have fled the fighting.

Kalpesh Lathigra: Passport-Style Portraits of Displaced Syrians Living in the Za’atari Refugee Camp (Feature Shoot)

Guillaume Herbaut: Chinese Weddings (CNN Photo blog)

Peter Pin: Life Beyond The Killing Fields (NPR Picture Show)

Angelos Tzortzinis

Angelos Tzortzinis

Angelos Tzortzinis: Societal Ills Spike in Crisis-Stricken Greece (NYT Lens)

Espen Rasmussen: Mud, Fire and Pain (Panos Pictures) Tough Guy claims to be the world’s most demanding one-day survival ordeal and it has been widely described as ‘the toughest race in the world’

Espen Rasmussen: Pain (Panos Pictures) As part of a longer project looking at masculinity and middle aged men, Espen visits the longest single stage cycle race in the world, from Tronheim to Oslo in Norway.

Kirsten Luce: Matadora (NYT Lens) In the Arena With a Smile — and a Bull

Brett Gundlock: One Small Town’s Fight to Banish a Brutal Mexican Cartel (Wired Raw File)

Yann Gross: A snake story in the Brazilian far west (Institute)

Kate Holt: Somalia surgeons: under the knife in Mogadishu (Guardian) audio slideshow

Siegfried Modola: Ethiopia’s ancient salt trail (Guardian)

Takayuki Maekawa: Wild Animals (CNN Photo blog)

Articles

030-035_FTMAG_0106_FINAL.indd

The Financial Times Magazine, June 1/2 2013

My friend, Robert Capa (FT Magazine) John Morris, former picture editor of Life, talks about the great photographer and his most historic roll of film – of D-Day

The month in photography – audio slideshow (Guardian) Vanessa Winship, Erwin Blumenfeld and Nobuyoshi Araki feature in June’s guide to the best photography around the world.

World Press Photo controversy: Objectivity, manipulation and the search for truth (BJP) Beyond the attacks leveraged against Paul Hansen’s winning World Press Photo, the recent controversy over image toning is symptomatic of the current state of photojournalism and its place in a society that has learned not to trust what it sees. Photojournalists, photography directors and post-producers speak to Olivier Laurent, and ask whether objectivity in photojournalism is actually attainable

Drama, Manipulation and Truth: Keeping Photojournalism Useful (Picture Dept)

chrishondrosfilm.com

chrishondrosfilm.com

Hondros: A Life in Frames – trailer (Chris Hondros film website)

Censored – images of our ugly truths, natural and man-made (Sydney Morning Herald)

A Photographer, A Fixer, the New York Times and Child Servitude in Haiti: A Story Gone Haywire, then Simply Gone (BagNewsNotes)

American beauty: Vanessa Winship’s photos of still, small-town US life (Guardian) Winship used her Henri-Cartier Bresson prize money well: to fund a book, She Dances on Jackson, in which she has captured the silence at the heart of a clamorous nation

Photographing What Endures For Australia’s Aboriginals (NPR Picture Show) Amy Toensing’s project for the National Geographic

Don McCullin guest of honour at 25th Visa pour l’Image (CPN)

A war photographer’s rediscovered images from Vietnam (CBS News)

Andrea Bruce

Andrea Bruce / Noor Images

War Through a Woman’s Eyes (American Photo magazine) Some of today’s top conflict photographers just happen to be women. We spoke with a handful of these photojournalists about their experiences—and how they differ from their male colleagues’

Photojournalists Tell the Untold Stories From Iraq (Slate Behold)

Kathy Ryan: Office Romance: Renzo Piano’s Light (NYT Magazine 6th Floor Blog)

Capturing ‘Out Cold’ Commuters with TIME’s Patrick Witty (Instagram blog)

Martin Parr: All the world’s a beach (FT Magazine) For one photographer, there is no better place than the seaside to observe human eccentricity in all its glory

Finding And Photographing Alaska’s Remote Veterans (NPR Picture Show)

‘Pictures from the Real World’: Derby, England in 1988 (LightBox)

Q&A: Why is Emphas.is now turning to its own platform to survive? (BJP)

Who Will Crowdfund the Crowdfunder? (NYT Lens)

Moving Walls (The Foreign Policy) Looking back on 15 years of human rights photography.

Through the Lens of Eggleston (WSJ) The selection of William Eggleston’s photographs, “At War with the Obvious,” currently on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, reminds us why he an American master. For the June issue of WSJ. Magazine,  the legendary photographer agreed to shoot part of his extensive collection of Leica and Canon cameras | Related

Garry Winogrand and the Art of the Opening (The Paris Review)

Wayne Miller obituary (Guardian) Magnum photographer celebrated for his images of the second world war and Chicago’s South Side

In Memoriam: Wayne Miller (1918 – 2013) (LightBox)

Stephanie Sinclair’s best photograph: child brides in Yemen (Guardian)

Featured photographer: Tim Richmond (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Albertina d’Urso (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Katharine MacDaid (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Joel van Houdt (Verve Photo)

The little girl in the photo, all grown up (AFP Correspondent blog) AFP photographer Jean-Philippe Ksiazek hears from a girl he photographed in Pristina at the end of the war in Kosovo

When Photography Imitates Voyeurism (NYT Magazine 6th Floor blog)

Joseph Eid / AFP / Getty Images

Joseph Eid / AFP / Getty Images

War and Representation: Showing the Limits of Comprehension (No Caption Needed)

Digital and the the desire for long form journalism (David Campbell blog)

What a Photograph Can Accomplish: Bending the Frame by Fred Ritchin (LightBox)

Chicago Sun-Times lays off its photo staff (Chicago Tribune)

Chicago Sun-Times will train reporters on ‘iPhone photography basics’ (Poynter.)

Alex Garcia: The Idiocy of Eliminating a Photo Staff (Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago photo blog)

Do Newspapers Need Photographers? (NYT)

How the Internet Killed Photojournalism (PetaPixel)

Spitting on the Grave (Jim Colton website) On Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer’s comment ‘there’s really no such thing as professional photographers anymore’

Defining “News photographer” for the future (Reuters photo blog)

Anton Corbijn to shoot James Dean biopic, Life (Guardian) Control director to explore real-life friendship between 50s icon and Life magazine photographer in new film

Harlequin Without His Mask (Francis Hodgson blog) On Rankin

NY Times Public Editor Questions T Magazine Photoshopping Policy (PDN)

NYC Tribeca Residents Enraged Over Photos They Claim Violate Their Privacy (ABC News)

‘Control Order House’ by Edmund Clark – Photographing our response to terrorism (The Independent)

Ponte City: An Apartheid-Era High Rise Mired in Myth (LightBox) In 2008, South African photographer Mikhael Subotzky, in collaboration with British artist Patrick Waterhouse, set out to create a visual document of the building as monumental as the structure itself, exploring a long, complex history mired in myth.

Interviews and Talks

Anastasia Taylor-Lind / VII

Anastasia Taylor-Lind / VII

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (Nat Geo Live) Mothers, Models, and Fighters | A rising star on the photography scene, Anastasia Taylor-Lind documents the lives of women who live isolated from male society, including in schools for Siberian supermodels and military training camps for Cossack women | video

John H. White (CNN) Howard Kurtz talks to Pulitzer prize-winning photographer John H. White about what the layoffs mean for the news industry after Chicago Sun-Times drops photographers

Jonas Bendiksen (Vice) Bendiksen Takes Photos in Countries That Don’t Exist

Winners from the 2013 World Press Photo Contest (WPP) Nineteen prizewinners discuss their award-winning work.

Alec Soth (A Photo Editor)

 Tom Powel Imaging inc.

Richard Mosse, The Enclave, 2013. Six screen film installation, color infrared film transferred to HD video. Filmed in Eastern Congo. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging inc.

Richard Mosse (Frieze Vimeo) The Impossible Image | Artist and photographer Richard Mosse reveals the stories behind the making of his latest film, ‘The Enclave’ (2013), in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which will be shown in the Irish Pavilion at this year’s 55th Venice Biennale.

Lauren Greenfield (Rookie magazine) Money Changes Everything: An Interview With Lauren Greenfield

Donna Ferrato (Vogue Italy) “I really believe in the power of photography to change the world. I think without it we would be like cavemen”

Fabio Bucciarelli (Photographic Museum of Humanity)

James Nachtwey (National Geographic magazine) Longer version on Stephen Alvarez’s Facebook page here

Maggie Steber  Part 1 | Part 2 (Leica blog)

John G. Morris (Vogue Italy)

Tim Page (Radio Australia) Page on history, photography and the Vietnam War

Thomas Dworzak (Roads and Kingdoms) Dworzak’s Instagram Chapbooks

Saul Leiter (In-Public)

Alan Chin

Alan Chin

Photojournalists on Covering the War in Iraq (The Leonard Lopate Show / WNYC) audio | Michael Kamber interviewed photojournalists from many leading news organizations to create a comprehensive collection of eyewitness accounts of the Iraq War—Photojournalists on War. He’s joined by photographers Alan Chin and Ashley Gilbertson, who discuss trying to cover the war in Iraq and examine the role of the media and issues of censorship

New booktells ‘untold stories’ from Iraq (MSNBC) Photojournalist Michael Kamber joins MSNBC’s Craig Melvin and fellow photojournalists Carolyn Cole and Ed Kashi to talk about his new book, “The Untold Stories From Iraq: Photojournalists on War”.

Doug Richard (ABC Arts) A New American Picture: Doug Rickard’s Google Street View road-trip

David Guttenfelder (The World) Inside the Hermit Kingdom: David Guttenfelder on Photographing North Korea

Mads Nissen

Mads Nissen

Mads Nissen (Panos Social) The Making of Amazonas

Ben Lowy (ABC Arts)

Ben Lowy (MSN Australia) Covering warzones with an iPhone

Kai Löffelbein (Leica blog) A Hidden World in Hong Kong

Tomas van Houtryve (The Story)

Michal Chelbin (The Voice of Russia)

Sue Ogrocki (LightBox) Moments of Hope in Oklahoma: One Photographer’s Story

Paul Hellstern (CNN) Photographer captures snapshots of courage after tornado levels OKC school

Ed Jones (LightBox Tumblr)

Stacy Pearsall (Peach Pit) In the Trenches with Combat Photographer

Katrin Koenning (No Borders Magazine) A sense of belonging

Alonzo J. Adams (LightBox Tumblr)

Laura Pannack (Photo Whoa) Speaking Through Your Photographs & Connecting with Your Viewer

Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com

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VICE Loves Magnum: An Interview with Christopher Anderson

Magnum is probably the most famous photo agency in the world. Even if you haven’t heard of it, chances are you’re familiar with its images, be they Robert Capa’s coverage of the Spanish Civil War, Steve McCurry’sAfghan Girl or Martin Parr’s very British holiday-scapes. Unlike most agencies, Magnum’s members are selected by the other photographers in the agency, which, given they’re the greatest photo agency in the world, means that becoming a member is a pretty grueling process. As part of an ongoing partnership with Magnum, we will be profiling some of their photographers over the coming weeks.

First up is Christopher Anderson, who became a Magnum nominee in 2005 and was a full member by 2010. His early work on Haitian immigrants’ illegal journey to America—during which he and they sank in the Caribbean Sea in a handmade wooden boat named Believe in God—won him the Robert Capa Gold Medal. And last year, we produced an episode of Picture Perfect about him.

His subsequent book projects include Son, a series of photos capturing his wife and young child as his own father grew ill with cancer, and Capitolio, which documents unrest in Caracas during the time of Chavez.

I had a chat with him about how he sees himself and how that’s changed over his career.


Joe Biden descends from Air Force Two in Virginia, shot for New York Magazine.

VICE: You’ve vocally distanced yourself from photojournalism in the past. Why is that?
Christopher Anderson: 
There are photojournalists in Magnum, but I don’t see it as a photojournalist agency. It’s more founded in documentary photography. If I were to use a term for myself, I feel I’d fit more closely in the bracket of documentary photography than photojournalism. The term photojournalist tends to be loaded with meaning: specifically that one reports the news. I don’t see that as my function. Even when I was photographing things that were news topics, like conflicts, my function was not that of a news reporter, my function was to comment on what I saw happen that day and to offer a subjective point of view. In my role, I was commenting on what was happening, but also trying to communicate what it felt like to be there when it was happening.

So you wanted to capture images that were more emotional and personal?
Exactly. But I would go further and say that I not just wanted to do that, that is in fact what I did do. I had no pretence of objectivity. I was photographing, giving my opinion, and I wanted you to know that I was giving my opinion.

Did your unconventional approach make it initially more difficult to sell your photos, or was it beneficial from the start?
Well, I don’t think I was going ‘round articulating that to editors, saying, “No, I won’t work for you unless you understand that what I do is subjective.” With the agency I was with before, it didn’t make a difference, as I was already sort of working for “journalistic magazines,” and I worked a lot for the New York Times Magazine. The kind of stories that I would do, even ones from conflict zones, would be longer and more in depth in their approach to what was happening there, trying to put what was happening in a more human, intimate context rather than the headlines of the day. But to be honest, the marketable advantage never crossed my mind at the time. I was just intent on trying to do what I did in the way I wanted to with as much integrity as possible.

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The best photographs don’t always make the best covers. It takes a smart concept, a meticulously executed image, smoothly integrated typography and the combination of all those factors to create an immediate and lasting impact. Our top ten photographic covers of 2012 show exquisite use of photography.

The most notable is New York Magazine’s magnificent cover by photographer Iwan Baan of a half blacked-out Manhattan during Hurricane Sandy. It’s instantly iconic and will become one of the greatest covers of all time. In the mix is also W‘s stunning fashion cover image of Marion Cotillard, ESPN‘s high-concept “Fantasy Football” cover, depicting an NFL player in a magical forest with a unicorn, and a photojournalistic cover, the Economist’s powerful image documenting the personal toll of the conflict in Gaza.

We also decided to include two covers in the mix that were striking photo-based illustrations. An aged Obama on the cover of Bloomberg Businessweek as well as a thoughtful commission by the New York Times Magazine for the visual artist Idris Kahn to reinterpret an iconic landmark on their London-themed cover.

A great cover is always a collaborative effort. To caption each of our selected covers, we spoke to a mix of editors, photo directors, art directors and photographers who took part during different stages of the creative process. In our selection, we refrained from choosing any TIME covers, though if we were to choose one, it would be Martin Schoeller’s arresting image of a mother breast-feeding her 4-year-old son, “Are You Mom Enough?”

Kira Pollack, Director of Photography

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“The campaign is in a lull. The wars overseas are winding down. Washington is paralyzed. I’ve loaded up my iPod with some new songs. There’s nothing to do but….hit the road!”

With that, veteran TIME political columnist Joe Klein began his three-week, eight-state road trip, which ended last Friday. Klein has made this sampling of the country’s political climate a yearly tradition. This time around, TIME sent three of the magazine’s contributors to accompany Klein for different legs of the journey. Here, LightBox presents a selection of their work as well as their thoughts from across America.


What was the single most memorable experience you had on the trip?

Andrew HinderakerIn Richmond, Virginia, at a Narcotics Anonymous meeting in a Drug Rehabilitation Center, we met a woman who’d struggled with addiction since age nine. She was a convicted felon, and now, in her 40’s, was 21 months clean. She’d recently convinced a friend to allow her to farm a piece of land. For someone like her, whose addiction left her reliant on medical care most of her life, President Obama’s healthcare legislation meant for her a fresh start. With affordable healthcare, she could be a small business owner, a farmer, an active, contributing citizen; without it, she’s just a recovering addict. We learned her story because another man at the meeting expressed his disdain at the Healthcare Reform Act. We got to watch their argument, and this woman’s story change a man’s mind. It certainly proved Joe’s point about getting to know one another; perhaps the government should sponsor free coffee and organize meetings once a week with a group of local strangers.

What was the economic and political mood of the parts of the country you visited?

Katy Steinmetz: People seemed disappointed and exhausted by the political and economic state of things in America. Many were hopeful, but more were resigned—past anger and yearning for a little compromise.

What was the #1 problem facing the people you met?

Pete Pin: This was dependent on class. For a group of upper middle class voters in Charleston, West Virginia, they were most concerned with the visceral partisanship of the country and the future of the health care law. For rural voters in Jackson and Newcomerstown, Ohio, they were most concerned with jobs and social ills.

What was their #1 reason for hope?

Pete: Community at the local level. I learned that in spite of the partisanship and bickering in Washington, people genuinely believed that things can and will get better, not because of intervention by the federal government, but rather because of the community coming together at the local level.

Andrew Hinderaker for TIME

Leslie Marchut and Briggs Wesche eat breakfast with Joe Klein in Chapel Hill, N.C.

What is the national character? Are there uniquely American traits?

Pete: The singular thread I found was an overwhelming sense of self-reliance. Liberalism in the classical sense, John Stuart Mill.

AndrewEveryone likes barbeque.

Did you return from the trip more or less optimistic about the future of the country?

Andrew: Certainly more optimistic. One of the things that struck me most about the places that we visited was all the conversation. In all these pockets of America, folks more than willing, eager even, to talk and debate reach new conclusions. I don’t think it’s the impression you’d get of our citizens from watching the nightly news, but it’s something I observed in every niche.

Andrew Hinderaker is a former TIME photo intern and a photojournalist whose work has appeared in TIME, The Wall Street Journal and New York Magazine.

Pete Pin is currently the international photo intern at TIME and a photographer whose work has also appeared in The New York Times and Forbes.

Katy Steinmetz is a reporter in TIME’s Washington bureau.

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Meryl Streep, 1990


Meryl Streep, 1984


Meryl Streep and Robert DeNiro, "Falling In Love", New York, NY, 1984


Meryl Streep and William Styron, "Sophies Choice", New York, NY, 1983


Meryl Streep, 1993


Kate Winslet, "Mildred Pierce", Brooklyn, NY, 2010


Martin Scorsese, "Hugo", London, England, 2010


Johnny Depp, Los Angeles, CA, 2009


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Sam Worthington on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Keira Knightley on Set of "Last Night"


Javier Bardem, Toronto, ON, 2007


Michael Fassbender, 2011


Kate Winslet and Ann Roth, "Mildred Pierce", Brooklyn, NY, 2010


Laura Linney, "The Big C", Stamford, CT, 2010


"Shutter Island", Boston, MA, 2008


"Nine", Cinecitta, Rome, Italy, 2009


Penelope Cruz and Daniel Day-Lewis, "Nine", Cinecitta, Rome, Italy, 2009


Tilda Swinton, New York, NY, 2009


Rachel Weisz, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Salma Hayek, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Woody Harrelson and Robin Wright, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Bennett Miller, Jonah Hill, Chris Pratt, & Brad Pitt, Toronto Film Festival, 2011


Isabella Rossellini and Elettra Wiedemann, New York Magazine, August 22, 2011


Jude Law and Matt Damon


Paris


Jordan


Cuba


Senegal


Keira Knightley


Liev Schreiber, New York, NY, 2009


Sacha Baron Cohen and Martin Scorsese, "Hugo", London, England, 2010


Jude Law and Robert Downey Jr., "Sherlock Holmes", Brooklyn, NY, 2009


Audrey Tatou, "Coco Avant Chanel", Paris, France, 2008


Kara Walker, Brooklyn , NY, 2008


Bob Dylan


Nina Chanel Abney, New York, NY, 2009


Donna Karan, New York, NY, 2009


Maya Angelou, Winsten-Salem, NC, 2009


Twiggy and Kate Moss, London, UK, 1999

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Features and Essays 

Egypt, Cairo, Tahrir….

Moises Saman has been kicking ass with his Cairo work…NYT front page pics on several occasions during the last two weeks…This is the slideshow a lot of people were talking about over the weekend…

Moises Saman: Cairo Undone (NYT) Cairo Undone on Magnum site.

Saman hit the front page also today (November 29) with an image  (to-me maybe not so obvious choice) seen below, which can be found online in the NYT’s Egypt Turmoil slideshow…featuring work by various photographers.

photo: Moises Saman

Below image ran on the front page of the International Herald Tribune last week….You can see it in black and white in this Saman’s tweet…The colour version is up on Magnum Photos site…

Moises Saman: Unrest in Cairo: Egypt’s Revolution Continues (Magnum)

Miguel Angel Sanchez: Egyptians (NYT Lens) Angel Sanchez’s website

Davide Monteleone: Egypt Waiting (VII)

Espen Rasmussen: Beyond Tahrir Square (Panos)

Guy Martin: The Egyptian Revolution (Panos)

Trevor Snapp: Revolution Round Two? (Global Post) Full edit on photographer’s archive

NB. See later in this post regarding the latest TIME cover on Egypt that ran on all markets except the US. Filed under Articles.

Tim Hetherington’s last images on Magnum Photos…

Credit: Tim Hetherington. LIBYA. Misurata. April 20, 2011. Tim’s last photograph.

Tim Hetherington: The Libya Negs (Magnum)

Occupy Wall Street…

Christopher Anderson: OWS (New York Magazine)

Noticed that Ashley Gilbertson’s OWS series shot in October had sadly disappeared from VII site, but the reason turned out to be that New Yorker had put him on assignment (here’s a pic of him working)…I’m sure the series will reappear on VII in the future, but for now we can enjoy an edit on Photo Booth…good news: it includes new frames, such as the below one,  shot this month…

Ashley Gilbertson: Occupy Wall Street (Photo Booth)

Nina Berman: Occupy Wall Street (NOOR)

Related to OWS issues I would say… Great series on American poverty by Joakim Eskildsen…

Joakim Eskildsen: Photographs of American Poverty (Lightbox)

From the other side of the American political spectrum…

Jason Andrew: Tea Party: Under the banners of American Flags  (Reportage)

DRC and elections…

Finbarr O’Reilly: Deadly Election Violence in Congo (Reuters)

Jonathan Torgovnik: Rebuilding DRC (Reportage)

Pierre Gonnord: Relatos (Lightbox)

Liz Hingley: Under Gods (Lightbox)

Gillian Laub: Turkey Day (Lightbox)

Paul Fusco: DGI  29 (Magnum in Motion)

Alixandra Fazzina: The Flowers of Afghanistan: First Sea (Photographer’s archive)

Pep Bonet: Microcredit Peru (NOOR)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Caspian (Foto8)

Saw and edit of this feature run in Time mag couple of weeks ago..

Xavier Zimbardo: Reconstruction of the Bolshoi Theatre (Reportage) Behind the scenes video with Xavier Zimbardo in French

Best of the year….

photo: Goran Tomasevic

Reuters : Best Photos of the Year 2011

photo: Lynsey Addario

VII – Best of 2011: Highlights of a Year in News   : VII photographers present their best images, shot or released in 2011

AFP: 2011 Pictures of the Year

Fan of David Cameron or not,these Tom Stoddart photos in Reportage Tumblr are worth seeing.Cameron by Stoddart for Sunday Times Magazine….

Tom Stoddart: David Cameron (Reportage Tumblr)

Andrew McConnell’s Gaza surfing series on Newsweek…Bummed I still haven’t received the first issue of my annual subscription… Would have loved to have seen this in print…

Andrew McConnell: Surf’s Up in Gaza (Newsweek)

McConnell from Gaza also, but very different…NGO piece…

Andrew McConnell: Regenerating Gaza (Guardian)

Japan…

Giulio Di Sturco: Awash in Wrackage :  Japan (PDNPhotoaDay)

Kishin Shinoyama: After the Storm: Post-Tsunami Japan (Lightbox)

Donald Weber: Life After Zero Hour (VII) Japan

Davide Monteleone: Dusha: Russian Soul (VII)

Stefano di Luigi: Hidden China (VII)

Massimo Berruti: Lashkars in Pakistan (Lightbox) The series in Le Monde

Annie Leibovitz:  Pilgrimage (NYT)

Luceo Images: Few and Far Between (NYT Lens)

Joao Pina: Tracing the Shadows of Operation Condor (NYT Lens)

Andew Testa: Mind the Masterpiece (Panos)

Kacper Kowalski: Winter Photos from the Skies Above Poland (NYT Lens)

Jared Moossy: Mourning in Mogadishu (Foreign Policy)

Sebastian Liste: Urban Quilombo (Reportage)

Teun Voeten: Narco Estado (Magnum Emergency Fund)

Nick Cobbing: The Solid Sea (Photographer’s website)

Harvey Wang: A World of Change on the Lower East Side (NYT)

Robb Hill: Rural Home Town (NYT Lens)

Suzanne Opton: Soldier Down: Portraits (Lightbox)

Kirill Nikitenko: Russian Portraits of Defiance (Newsweek) Nikitenko’s website

Brian Van Der Brug: In Prison and Dying (LA Times Framework photo blog)

Lourdes Jeannette: Blood Ties (Lightbox)

Caged animals.

Asmita Parelkar: Not-So-Wild-Kingdom (NYT Lens)

Stuffed animals.

Klaus Pichler: Behind the Scenes Photos of Natural History (NYT Lens)

Guillaume Herbaut: The Zone (Project website) Now in English

Guillermo Arias: Tijuana River City (zReportage)

Kate Holt: The Real Cost of War (zReportage)

Natalie Naccache Mourad: Madaneh Marriages (photographer’s website)

Marc Lester: Living with Breast Cancer (Anchorage Daily News)

Oli Scarff: Winners at the Poultry Club’s 2011 national show (Guardian)

 Interviews and Talks


David Douglas Duncan (Lightbox)

Seamus Murphy (Verve Photo)

David Alan Harvey (Develop photo Vimeo)

Steve McCurry’s One-Minute Masterclass #6 (Phaidon)

Giles Duley : Becoming the Story (Economist)

Jason Larkin (Frontline club)

Alissa Everett : Giving up finance for photojournalism (CNN)

Sebastian Liste pt.1 / pt.2 (Daylight Magazine)

Marco Grob : How I Got That Shot: The 3-Minute Portrait (PDN)

Is this Annie Leibovitz and Fuji X100?

Annie Leibovitz (NPR)

Annie Leibovitz ♥’s Her iPhone Camera (PDN)

Jodi Bieber talks about the reaction to her World Press Photo winning photograph on The Strand (BBC)

Anastasia Taylor-Lind (The Broad’s Sheet)

Useful advice by Rachel Palmer…

Rachel Palmer : How to get a photography commission for an NGO (photographer’s/photo editor’s website)

Kate Peters (IdeasTap)

Eric White (MSNBC photo blog)

Lisa Pritchard : Ask an Agent 5 (LPA blog)

Liz Hingley : Turning point (NYT Lens)

BagNewsSalon webinar, “The Visual Politics of Occupy Wall Street.” :  4 December

Videos

BBC: The ‘genius’ of Tim Hetherington killed in war

Articles 

Time magazine does it again….’dummying-up’ (I might have just made up that word) the US edition I mean… My mate Tim Fadek has the TIME cover this week with a terrific image from Cairo in all markets expect the US….

Peek inside…This is how Tim’s two other photos ran…

Comment…

Business Insider: These Time Magazine Covers Explain Why Americans Know Nothing About The World

PDN: Israel Apologizes to Lynsey Addario

Saw Lynsey Addario ( @lynseyaddario) tweet a link to this Marie Claire piece on female photojournalists…Featuring Addario herself, Agnes Dherbeys, Erin Trieb, Stephanie Sinclair, and Andrea Bruce

photo: Stephanie Sinclair

Marie Claire: Female Photojournalists | “Once thought of as too frail for the job, five award-winning women photojournalists share their most vivd memories from the field — and the images they will never forget.”

Related…

NYT: Arrests and Attacks on Women Covering Protests in Cairo 

NYT: Software to Rate How Dratically Photos Are Retouched

PDN: Inside the Bestseller List: Top Photo Books of 2011

NYT: Shooting for Global Change (NYT Lens)

I was in Istanbul over the weekend, but sadly had no time to check out any of these exhibitions…

photo: Bruno Barbey

NYT: A Whirling Document of Turkish Culture

PDN: Cartier-Bresson Photo Sets Record at Christie’s Auction in Paris

Yahoo: Camera lost at sea returned with the help of social networking

TimeOut: Photography galleries in London

Dvafoto: Find Copyright Violations of Your Pictures With src-img Bookmarklet

A Photo Editor: Real World Estimates – Flat Rate Magazine Contracts

BJP: Editorial photographers hit by latest Getty Images cuts

BJP: Photographer Jean-Christian Bourcart wins the 2011 Prix Nadar for his book Camden

BJP: Celebrated printer Gene Nocon dies

Joerg Colberg: What Photographs Can and Cannot Do (Conscientious)

Guardian: Jodi Bieber’s Best Shot

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist Tim Wimborne

Photoshelter Guide: Selling Stock Photography

Foto8: Book review – Ben Lowy: Iraq Perspectives

Related..

A Photo Editor: This Week In Photography Books

Looking into some  heavy duty camera ‘bags’… Saw Greg Funnell tweet this review he had done in 2008…

Greg Funnell: Gear Review : Think Tank Airport Security Vs Pelican Case 1510 (Photographer’s blog)

Verve Photo: Jake Price

Awards, Grants, and Competitions 

photo: Jan Grarup

Leica Oskar Barnack Award will be accepting entries from 16 January 

College Photographer of the Year : International picture story winning images & judges screencast are online

Rory Peck Awards Winners

FotoEvidence Book Award open for submissions

Photo Lucida Critical Mass 2011 Winners

FotoVisura Grant

LPA Student Challenges 

Crowd Funding

Emphas.is Crowdfunding photojournalism survey

Behind the smokescreen by Rocco Rorandelli (Emphas.is) featured on BJP

Grozny – Nine Cities by Kravets, Morina, Yushko (Emphas.is) project featured on NYT Lens in 2010

Agencies and Collectives

VII Newsletter

Panos Pictures newsletter

Statement Images submissions deadline extended

Jobs

Look3 : Exhibits Coordinator

Saw these on Twitter…

New Yorker : spring multimedia intern (students only) : Contact kristina_budelis[at]newyorker.com

Redux is in need of an intern in NYC office : Adobe Creative Suite skills is necessary:  send an email to submissions[at]reduxpictures.com with Internship in the subject line

Intern for Phaidon.com . Email features@phaidon.com with your CV

Desk Space

Roof Unit : London

Photographers 

Website relaunch…

Marcus Bleasdale

Benjamin Lowy : December 2011 Promo

Asmita Parelkar

Louis Quail

Caleb Ferguson

Marc Lester

Bruno Mancinelle

To finish off…

Very, very good Erroll Morris short… The Umbrella Man from NYT

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About

Conspiracy Keanu is an advice animal image macro series featuring a still photo of the Canadian actor Keanu Reeves wearing a frightened expression from the 1989 comedy film Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure. The images are typically captioned with paranoid conjectures and shallow philosophical questions that show similarities to the Paranoid Parrot, Philosoraptor and Stoner Dog advice animal series.

Origin

On December 11th, 2008, New York Magazine’s Vulture Blog[3] published a slideshow titled “Vulture’s Complete Field Guide to the Facial Expressions of Keanu Reeves” that consisted of screen captures of Reeves from various films. The 22nd slide featured an image of Ted (played by Keanu Reeves) taken from the 1989 comedy film Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure in a scene where Ted is being chased by medieval knights.

The image was subsequently used as a reaction face with the earliest known instance occuring on the Fark[1] forums (shown left) on September 17th, 2010. The first image macro (shown right) was posted to the r/funny subreddit[2] with the caption “What if we CAN breathe in space / and they just don’t want us to escape” on June 2nd, 2011, which accumulated 6,847 up votes prior to being archived.

Spread

An instance with the caption “What if all the specs we see in the light / are all miniature universes?” was submitted to the humor site FunnyJunk[11] on September 24th, 2011.

In November of 2011, Conspiracy Keanu image macros began to spread on a larger scale with the launch of a Facebook fan page[10] on November 19th and compilations were posted to various sites including BuzzFeed[13], Pleated Jeans[14] and the web culture blog UpRoxx[5] within the next few days. On December 15th, the web culture blog Smosh[16] published a “Best of Conspiracy Keanu” post. The domain for the single topic blog ConspiracyKeanu.com[12] was registered on December 18th. Additionally, derivatives have been posted to FunnyJunk[6], Tumblr[7], Troll.me[9] and Reddit.[8] A Quickmeme[4] page has 23,294 submissions and a Facebook[15] page has 1,221 likes as of Febraury 28th, 2012.

Notable Examples

Template

Search Interest

External Links

[1] Fark – China plans to lead world in eco-friendly cars. Haven’t they lead enough?

[2] Reddit – Conspiracy Keanu

[3] NYMag – Vulture’s Complete Field Guide to the Facial Expressions of Keanu Reeves

[4] Quickmeme – Conspiracy Keanu

[5] UpRoxx – Conspiracy Keanu Puts A Meme To What Keanu Reeves Is Thinking

[6] FunnyJunk – conspiracy keanu

[7] Tumblr – #conspiracy keanu

[8] Reddit – conspiracy keanu

[9] Troll.me – conspiracy keanu

[10] Facebook – Conspiracy Keanu

[11] Funny Junk – What If

[12] ConspiracyKeanu.com – Conspiracy Keanu

[13] BuzzFeed – The 21 Best Conspiracy Keanu Meme Images

[14] Pleated Jeans – Best of the Conspiracy Keanu Meme

[15] Facebook – Conspiracy Keanu

[16] Smosh – Best of Conspiracy Keanu!

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Fluid Grids

Early last year, I worked on the redesign of a rather content-heavy website. Design requirements were fairly light: the client asked us to keep the organization’s existing logo and to improve the dense typography and increase legibility. So, early on in the design process, we spent a sizable amount of time planning a well-defined grid for a library of content modules.

Over the past few years, this sort of thinking has become more common. Thanks to the advocacy of Mark Boulton, Khoi Vinh, and others, we’ve seen a resurgence of interest in the typographic grid, and how to use it on the web. And frankly, the idea’s been a smash hit: a million CSS frameworks have bloomed, with sundry tools to complement them, each built to make grid-based design even more accessible to the average designer. And why not? After a few minutes of griddy thinking, the benefits become clear: designers gain a rational, structured framework for organizing content and users gain well-organized, legible sites.

However, our client had one last, heart-stopping requirement: the design had to be fluid and resize with the browser window. Normally, this would cause me to rejoice both noisily and embarrassingly. Fluid layouts are an undervalued commodity in web design. They put control of our designs firmly in the hands of our users and their browsing habits. They’ve also utterly failed to seize the imagination of web designers.

Minimum screen resolution: a little white lie

Instead of exploring the benefits of flexible web design, we rely on a little white lie: “minimum screen resolution.” These three words contain a powerful magic, under the cover of which we churn out fixed-width layout after fixed-width layout, perhaps revisiting a design every few years to “bump up” the width once it’s judged safe enough to do so. “Minimum screen resolution” lets us design for a contrived subset of users who see our design as god and Photoshop intended. These users always browse with a maximized 1024×768 window, and are never running, say, an OLPC laptop, or looking at the web with a monitor that’s more than four years old. If a user doesn’t meet the requirements of “minimum screen resolution,” well, then, it’s the scrollbar for them, isn’t it?

Of course, when I was coding the site, I didn’t have the luxury of writing a diatribe on the evils of fixed-width design. Instead, I was left with a sobering fact: while we’d designed a rather complex grid to serve the client’s content needs, the client—and by extension, the client’s users—was asking for a fluid layout. As almost all of the grid-based designs I could list off at that time were rigidly fixed-width, I was left with a prickly question: how do you create a fluid grid?

As it turns out, it’s simply a matter of context.

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