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The New Yorker

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Brooklyn-based photographer Ryan Page creates work that’s utterly timeless; street photographs of his native New York captured with an unassuming eye. His monochrome images have a film noir moodiness that recalls Hitchcock and a narrative ambiguity that’s evocative of the mysterious tangential plots of fellow New-Yorker Paul Auster. Ryan makes his images with mystery in mind, as he told The New Yorker: “Mystery is a word I come back to a lot in my work. I’m always inspired by the mystery that’s invoked when we look at images whose context is unknown. I believe the mind is attracted to these types of images because they force viewers to use their own imagination, allowing them to experience the wonder of possibility.”

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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    Ryan Page: Past, Present, Future

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Illustration is one of those wonderfully versatile forms of mark-making which comes in every different guise imaginable – from dynamic, fast-paced and full of action, to slow, deliberate and painstakingly detailed – so it’s more or less a given that the very best illustrators out there will have mastered as many different styles as possible. This is where Josh Cochran comes in.

He belongs to that rare school of visual storytellers who tend to find success as editorial illustrators, whose handle on their medium is so complete that they are able to convey complex, multi-layered messages through a single image. Whether that be for an article in a financial magazine about how companies roll content from one place to another, or an enormous mural spanning whole walls created in response to a collection of life goals and dreams, no idea is too abstract for Josh’s talents. if you don’t believe me, here’s an update on what he’s been setting his masterful mind to of late.

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Henry Gustave Molaison was a man who couldn't make memories. Better known to neuroscientists as "HM", the late Molaison suffered from seizures as a young man and struggled to lead a normal life, but things took a dramatic shift after he received a lobotomy in August 1953. Doctors removed large chunks of HM's temporal lobes and most of his hippocampus, on the assumption that these regions were responsible for the patient's neurological problems. The operation did cure HM's seizures, but it left him in a unique case of anterograde amnesia; he could remember his childhood and his personality remained unchanged, but he could not form new memories.

As Steven Shapin writes in a piece for the New Yorker this week, the operation left HM in a constant state of discovery and confusion, but it also gave scientists remarkable new insight into how the brain processes and stores memory.

"The operation could not have been better designed if the intent had been to create a new kind of experimental object that showed where in the brain memory lived," Shapin writes. "Molaison gave scientists a way to map cognitive functions onto brain structures. It became possible to subdivide memory into different types and to locate their cerebral Zip Codes."

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Gears_of_war_1020_large

Writing the book The Art of Design of Gears of War in 2011, games writer Tom Bissell has a close connection with the Gears franchise. As Gears of War: Judgement — the fourth instalment in the franchise — hits stores in the US, Bissell has spoken about his work on the title, detailing his interactions with level designers and how he helped portray the struggle of the Cog army.

Continue reading…

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Adrian Tomine has a clean, simple and elegant style of art, one that goes well with The New Yorker. This book has illustrations he created from 1999 for the magazine, and also some unpublished works that includes a few comics and a few sketches he did on the subway. While some pieces capture scenes of New York, the rest are more editorial illustrations.

The art is beautiful. I like the toned down use of colours, the strong black and lovely line work. He has a rather timeless style.

Some drawings really work, such as the one on the cover. Two strangers look at each other after realising they are reading the same book while the train they are on are about to go the opposite direction. In this case, the picture is better than what can be expressed in works. The editorial drawings, however, would be much better if the captions had explained the context rather than just giving the story's title. Adrian Tomine's comments are insightful but he only wrote for selected pieces.

The layout of the book could be better. There's too much unnecessary white space at times. Several drawings can certainly be printed bigger. Those printed at full height looks so much better, even when printed across the page gutter. I didn't like the publication details are by the side but the captions are located at the back of the book, even when there's enough space on the pages in front.

Recommended to those who like editorial art.

New York Drawings is available at Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository (US | UK)

New York Drawings

New York Drawings
Unnecessary white space.

New York Drawings

New York Drawings

New York Drawings

New York Drawings
Drawings on the subway trains are nice. There are also jotted thoughts.

New York Drawings

New York Drawings

New York Drawings

New York Drawings
Something probably everyone can relate to.

New York Drawings

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ESSAY CONTAINS EXPLICIT CONTENT

Joao Pina

Shadow Of The Condor

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“Operation Condor” was a 1970s secret military plan sponsored by the United States during the Dirty War years, which aimed to eliminate the political opponents to the right wing military regimes. It took place in six countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay.

It officially started in late 1975, when the secret services had a meeting in Santiago, Chile to define a strategy to use common resources and exchange information, man power and techniques to execute the plan. Thousands of people, mostly left wing workers and students, were arrested, tortured and executed, leading to 60,000 deaths, although a final number could never be confirmed because of the number of mass executions.

This project aims to show the scars and enormous impact left on the survivors and families of those who were killed. From the Amazon jungle in Brazil to the cold lands of Patagonia, thousands of victims still lay buried in unmarked graves, and the survivors struggle to cope with their memories.

Since the beginning of this investigation back in 2005, I have begun to take interviews with victims and families of those who disappeared, and have also visited sites of imprisonment, executions, and burials. I believe that by making these images I can help build a collective memory about the people behind this secretive operation who have never been held accountable.

I will return to the region and continue to build this body of work in Bolivia and Paraguay. These two countries still require much time to research and photograph. I will talk to survivors like Martin Almada, a lawyer who found the archives where thousands of documents prove the existence of “Operation Condor” in Paraguay.

No complete documentary project of this scope in all six countries has ever been completed, and none relying on photographs has been attempted. I hope to help generations of South Americans to know and understand the story of their countries.

 

Bio

Joao Pina was born in Lisbon, Portugal, in 1980, he began working as a photographer at age of 18.

His images have been published in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Time Magazine, Newsweek, Stern, GEO, El Pais, D Magazine, Visão and others.

In 2007 he published his first book “Por teu livre pensamento” featuring 25 former Portuguese political prisoners. The book inspired an Amnesty International advertising campaign that won a Lion d’Or award, at the Cannes International Festival of Creativity 2011.

He has also been awarded the Estação Imagem grant in 2010 and a finalist for the Henri Nannen, Care award. Until 2010 he lived in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he continues to document the remnants of “Operation Condor”, a secret military operation to destroy the political opposition to the dictatorships in South America in the 1970s.

Lately he has been a privileged observer of the “Arab Spring”, traveling on several occasions to Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, while continuing his work in Latin America.

 

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Lilli-carre-list

Lilli Carré has all bases covered with her hugely applicable illustrative stylings. From editorial spots for top US magazines and papers (The Believer, The New Yorker, Best American Nonrequired Reading… you get my drift) to works on paper that begin to leave the page (literally) and a panoply of mini-narratives, from ten second loops of moving drawings to ingeniously crafted cartoons and animations, comics and graphic novels.

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