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Original author: 
Mikko Takkunen

Features and Essays

Kirsten Luce for the New York Times

Kirsten Luce for the New York Times

Kirsten Luce: A Border Evolves as Washington Pursues Immigration Reform (NYT)

Ricardo Cases: ¡Evangélicos! (LightBox) Intensity, Isolation, and Fiesta

Ilona Szwarc: The Cowgirl Way (NYT Magazine)

Peter Hapak: Portraits of the Gay Marriage Revolution (LightBox)

Jeff Brown: Bar Regulars (NYT Magazine) This Is Who Rules the Bars of New York

Nina Berman:  Stop-and-Frisk (Photo Booth)

Carlos Javier Ortiz: Too Young To Die (Pulitzer Center) Chicago’s Gang Violence

Shannon Stapleton: North Dakota Booming (Reuters)

Lisa Wiltse: Mary’s Pageant (Reportage by Getty Images)

Sebastian Liste

Sebastian Liste / Reportage by Getty Images

Sebastian Liste: In The Wake Of Chavez (Reportage by Getty Images)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: The Legacy of Venezuela’s Bolivarian Liberator (Reportage by Getty Images)

Jorge Cabrera: Death in the murder capital (Reuters) Honduras

Bryan Denton: Afghan Army Taking the Lead (NYT)

Bryan Denton: Hardships in Afghan Refugee Camps (NYT)

John D. McHugh: Observe The Sons of Afghan Marching Towards The War (Reportage by Getty Images)

Sebastião Salgado / Amazonas / Contact Press Images

Sebastião Salgado / Amazonas / Contact Press Images

Sebastião Salgado: Genesis (LightBox)

Adam Dean: Myanmar Grapples With Ethnic Tensions (NYT)

Sim Chi Yin: Fragile Lake (The Straits Times) Burma

Stephen Dock: Mali, the new gold rush (Agence Vu)

Marco Grob: International Mine Action Day: Portraits (LightBox)

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The Spring that Wasn’t (Panos) Yemen

Hatem Moussa: How to Make Charcoal in Gaza (TIME)

Andrea Bruce: Christians in Syria Celebrate Good Friday With Hope and Fear (NYT)

Kalpesh Lathigra: Za’atari refugee camp (The Independent) Syrian refugee crisis

Peter Hove Olesen: Assad (Politiken) Syria

Lynsey Addario / VII

Lynsey Addario / VII

Lynsey Addario: Mortal Beloved (New Republic) The extreme perils of motherhood in Sierra Leone

Diana Matar: Return to Libya (Photo Booth)

Karla Gachet and Ivan Kashinsky: Kings of the Roma (NYT Lens)

Tomas van Houtryve: No Man’s Land (The Foreign Policy) Exclusive photos from the 38th parallel.

Sergio Ramazzotti: North Korea: Inside the utopia (Parallelo Zero)

Evi Zoupanos: Acid Attack (zReportage) Bangladesh

Mike Brodie: A Period of Juvenile Prosperity (Guardian)

Gert Jochems: S (Agence Vu)

Matthieu Rytz: The Eroding Culture of Kuna Yala (NYT Lens) Panama

Stephen McLaren: Wading into weirdness on the street (NYT Lens)

Benjamin Lowy: The First Signs of Spring in Brooklyn (NYT Magazine)

Chad A. Stevens: West Virginia Mining (CNN photo blog)

David Kasnic: Rattlesnake Roundup: Texas style (CNN photo blog)

Benjamin Bechet: El Hierro (CNN photo blog) An ‘everlasting island’ | Spain

Articles

KCNA / AFP / Getty Images

KCNA / AFP / Getty Images

Detecting North Korea’s doctored photos (AFP Correspondent blog)

North Korea ‘Photoshopped’ marine landings photograph (The Telegraph)

War’s Bricolage (No Caption Needed)

Photographer Sebastião Salgado captures areas of Earth untouched by modern life (Metro)

Ron Haviv’s Bosnian War Images as Evidence in War Trials (NYT Lens)

Sebastian Junger Shoots for the Truth (Outside) Junger’s powerful new documentary about the life of war photographer Tim Hetherington shows us why dedicated journalists are needed now more than ever

HBO documentary on the life and death of conflict photographer Tim Hetherington premieres next month (The Verge)

Inside the War Machine: New Documentary Maps an Epic Photo Career (Wired Rawfile)

Famed photojournalist Robert Capa and the mystery of his “Mexican Suitcase” (Imaging Resource)

Edmund Clark: control order house (FT Magazine)

George Strock / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

George Strock / Time Life Pictures / Getty Images

Photo That Was Hard to Get Published, but Even Harder to Get (NYT Lens) One of the most significant war photographs in American history is routinely taken for granted.

Syria’s Media War (The Daily Beast)

Fake Somali Pirates Scam Western Journalists (The Daily Beast)

At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston (Photo Booth)

William Eggleston’s photographs of eerie Americana – in pictures (Guardian)

War reporting documentary wins prestigious Peabody Award (Star.com)

The girl in the 2011 Afghan bombing photograph (The Independent)

Snaps by Elliott Erwitt – review (Guardian)

Chim: Photography’s forgotten hero (The Jewish Chronicle)

Femen gets kick in the pants (but not on Facebook) (AFP Correspondent blog)

AP opens full news bureau in Myanmar (AP Big Story)

Photojournalists Move To Instagram, From Syria to Sandy (American Photo)

Traditional Photographers Should Be Horrified By The Cover Of Today’s New York Times (Business Insider)

NYT’s front-page Instagram: Maybe not the end of photography (Poynter)

Instagram and the New Era of Paparazzi (NYT)

Hyper-Realistic CGI Is Killing Photographers, Thrilling Product Designers (Wired)

Tim A. Hetherington

Tim A. Hetherington

The Guide: April 2013 Edition (LightBox) TIME LightBox presents a new monthly round-up of the best books, exhibitions and ways to experience photography beyond the web

The month in photography  (The Guardian) New exhibitions and books by William Eggleston, Sebastião Salgado, Kitra Cahana and Pieter Hugo are featured in this month’s guide to the best photography around the world.

Someone I Know (Someoneiknow.net)  Project bringing together some of the best known emerged and emerging photographers from across the globe. The brief for the photographers was to take a portrait of someone they know, no matter how loosely.

The Ethics of Street Photography (Joerg Colberg)

The Age of “Fauxtojournalism” (Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago blog)

Bobby’s Book: Bruce Davidson’s Photographs of the Brooklyn Gang The Jokers (Photo Booth)

Magnum Photos approaches new audiences in deal with Vice magazine (British Journal of Photography)

MJR – Collection 100 / A history (Vimeo)

Review: Liquid Land by Rena Effendi (Joerg Colberg)

Uncharted Territories: Black Maps by David Maisel (LightBox)

Classical Portraits of Extreme Plastic Surgery (Slate Behold photo blog)

From Desert to City: A Photographer Unveils Forgotten Stars (LightBox)

Paul McDonough : Shooting film on the move (CNN photo blog)

A Look at the Pristine: Walter Niedermayr’s Aspen Series (LightBox)

Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo’s Photos From His Native Cuba (NYT Lens)

Larry Racioppo’s Photos of Good Friday Processions In Brooklyn (NYT Lens)

Gillian Laub : On Passover, Celebrating Life and Ritual in a Jewish Family (Slate Behold photo blog)

McNair Evans: Chasing hope on the railways (CNN photo blog)

Ahn Sehong : Comfort Women in China (NYT Lens)

Henri Huet / AP

Henri Huet / AP

An Expansive Exhibition of War Images at the Annenberg Space in Los Angeles (NYT Lens)

Anatomy of a Successful Grant Application: Joseph Rodriguez on the Audience Engagement Grant (PDN)

Crowd-Sourcing, Part One: Ask And You Shall Receive (NPPA)

The Photographer’s Guide to Copyright (PhotoShelter)

Featured photographer: Paolo Patrizi  (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Abbie Trayler-Smith (Firecracker)

Judge Rules William Eggleston Can Clone His Own Work, Rebuffing Angry Collector (Artinfo)

Judge Rules William Eggleston Can Clone His Own Work (Joerg Colberg)

How Joachim Brohm set the world of landscape photography on fire (The Guardian)

Thoughts on the TIME Gay Marriage (or, Gay Sex?) Covers (BagNewsNotes)

Can 20×200 Be Saved? Anger From Collectors Mounts as Leading Art Site Flounders (Artinfo.com)

Henry Groskinsky / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Image

Henry Groskinsky / Time & Life Pictures / Getty Images

The Day MLK Was Assassinated: A Photographer’s Story  (LIFE) On April 4, 1968, LIFE photographer Henry Groskinsky and writer Mike Silva, on assignment in Alabama, learned that Martin Luther King, Jr., had been shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. The two men jumped into their car, raced the 200 miles to the scene of the assassination

Photographer Who Shot Beatles Concert With a Fake Press Pass Sells the Pics for $45K (PetaPixel)

Camera Finds Way Back to Owner After Drifting 6,200 Miles from Hawaii to Taiwan (PetaPixel)

Photographer Accuses Getty of Loaning Images to CafePress Instead of Licensing Them (PetaPixel)

Photographing a Mother’s Descent Into Mental Illness (Mother Jones)

Review: Tales of Tono by Daido Moriyama (Joerg Colberg)

The new war poets: the photographs of Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin (The Telegraph)

LaToya Ruby Frazier Photography at Brooklyn Museum (NYT)

Makoko exhibition opens a window on a Nigerian world (The Guardian)

Distance & Desire: Encounters with the African Archive (Photo Booth)

Rene Burri in colour (BBC)

Helmut Newton Book ‘World Without Men’ Returns (The Daily Beast)

Interviews and Talks

Dominic Nahr / Magnum Photos

Dominic Nahr / Magnum Photos

Dominic Nahr (Leica blog) Recording History for Posterity

Sebastião Salgado (Monocle Radio) Salgado interview starts at 13 minutes into the show

Mike Brodie (Guardian) On his freight train photographs: ‘It’s a romantic life, at least in the spring and summer’

Andrew DeVigal (Wired RawFile blog) Smart Readers Are Too Distracted to Dig Smart Content

Carlos  Javier Ortiz (CBS News) Photographer brings Chicago gun violence into sharp focus | slideshow on CBS News website 

Jenn Ackerman (Slate Behold photo blog) Trapped: The Story of the Mentally Ill in Prison

Farzana Wahidy (NPR) How A Female Photographer Sees Her Afghanistan

Andrea Bruce / The New York Times

Andrea Bruce   / The New York Times

Andrea Bruce (NOOR) My first day in Damascus

Steve McCurry (Vice)

Raghu Rai (Visura Magazine)

Mohamed Abdiwahab (LightBox Tumblr)

Bert Stern (LightBox)  The Original ‘Mad Man’

Duane Michaels (Bomb blog)

Gregory Crewdson (The Telegraph) Gregory Crewdson’s silent movies

Maika Elan (Vietnam News)

Lisa Rose (The Chicago Tribune Assignment Chicago blog) The Goals of PhotoPhilanthropy

Shannon Jensen (The Daily Pennsylvanian) No ‘fancy pictures’, just tell the story

Alice Proujansky (The Guardian) Alice Proujansky’s best photograph – childbirth in the Dominican Republic

Camille Seaman (Piper Mackay Photography)

 Zhe Chen (Le Journal de la Photographie)

Guillem Valle (Leica blog) Transporting The Viewer Through Photographs

Stanley Forman (Boston Globe) Photojournalist Stanley Forman on his new book

Bill Armstrong (Aperture)

Thomas Ruff (Aperture)

Misha Friedman (Dazed Digital)

John Kilar (Dazed Digital)

Daniel Cronin (Dazed Digital)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Upcoming Deadlines for Grants, Fellowships Up to $10,000 (PDN)

PROOF : Award for Emerging Photojournalists  : Deadline May 1, 2013

NPPF Scholarship : Deadline April 15, 2013

Lens Culture student photography awards 2013 : Deadline April 15, 2013

72nd Annual Peabody Awards: Complete List of Winners (Peabody)

Best of Photojournalism 2013 Multimedia Winners

Photographic Museum of Humanity 2013 Grant Winners

William Eggleston to receive Outstanding Contribution to Photography award (British Journal of Photography) Also on The Guardian here.

Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com.

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A key part of the It’s Nice That redesign was our new Best of the Web section where we can flag up just some of the myriad brilliance which wings its way across the web every single day. Nearly 1,000 articles have joined the BOTW march since its launch in April and we really believe that pointing our readers in the right directions builds on the content we produce for a really well-rounded art and design experience.

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Too often the subjects of images of Africa seem to be reduced to symbols - viewers do not encounter them as fully rounded human beings, rarely seeing journalistic images of the middle class, artists or the cultural heritage of African countries. Peter DiCampo, with his iPhone, endeavors to address this.

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Apple's prized product designer Jonathan ("Jony") Ive is a constant source of fascination among the press—doubly so after the death of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. Though Ive appears with relative frequency in news articles and documentaries, interest in his design philosophy has never let up. Perhaps that is because Ive has always spoken in an abstract, philosophical sense about the way he approaches design, which only seems to perpetuate the mystery surrounding one of Apple's core talents. In an extensive two-part interview published in UK newspaper The Telegraph on Wednesday, Ive discussed some of his product approaches as well as his attitudes toward design failures, Apple's performance under newly minted CEO Tim Cook, and more. The interview itself is worth reading, but we took interest in a few highlights from throughout his discussion with The Telegraph. Among them:

  • Contrary to popular belief, Ive says the iPad 2's design was not inspired by the making of a samurai sword. Rumor after the iPad 2's launch in 2011 was that Ive had traveled to Japan to watch the process of creating such a sword, which then translated to the "razor edge" of the iPad 2, but Ive insists this is just lore.
  • Don't like the stitched leather UI on a number of Apple's iOS and Lion applications, like Find My Friends, Maps, and iCal? It seems that Ive doesn't either—The Telegraph claims Ive "winced" when asked about the stitched leather, but gave a diplomatic response: "My focus is very much working with the other teams on the product ideas and then developing the hardware and so that's our focus and that's our responsibility. In terms of those elements you're talking about, I'm not really connected to that."
  • Ive says he thinks the products he's currently working on are the "most important and the best work we've done." This seems to fall along the company line of always hinting at the next big thing, but Ive heavily implies that some of Apple's unreleased products are truly his best work. "[W]hich of course I can't tell you about."
  • Ive acknowledges that not all of his designs are successful, but most of them remain behind closed doors. Still, it's hard for him to part with a product design once the team decides the product just isn't going to work. "[T]here have been times when we've been working on a program and when we are at a very mature stage and we do have solutions and you have that sinking feeling because you're trying to articulate the values to yourself and to others just a little bit too loudly," he said. "And you have that sinking feeling that the fact that you are having to articulate the value and persuade other people is probably indicative of the fact that actually it's not good enough. On a number of occasions we've actually all been honest with ourselves and said 'you know, this isn't good enough, we need to stop'. And that's very difficult."
  • On Tim Cook's potential "failures" as a CEO compared to Steve Jobs, Ive strongly believes that won't happen. "We're developing products in exactly the same way that we were two years ago, five years ago, ten years ago. It's not that there are a few of us working in the same way: there is a large group of us working in the same way," he said.

Ive, who has been knighted before the UK for his various achievements, was knighted once again on Wednesday for his services in design and enterprise.

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Marc Shoul

Brakpan

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Brakpan is a small town that lies on the East Rand of Gauteng, sandwiched between Boksburg, Benoni and Springs. A once-prosperous mining community, today there are pawnshops, roadhouses, mechanics, mini casinos and other day-to-day shops lining the two main roads that slice through the town. Brakpan is like going back in time; so many aspects of the town remind me of old images I have seen of South Africa. Despite all the changes in nearby Johannesburg, Brakpan still goes about its business in much the same way it did before.  There is a lack of modern development. You don’t see Tuscan townhouse complexes or buildings with glass facades. It’s all very simple and straight forward – almost transparent, and this transparency can be seen in the people too. You won’t find any airs or graces, no fancy cappuccino shops, sushi cafes or organic goods in Brakpan.

The town does not seem to have benefited from its gold rush glory days, which spanned between 1911 until the mid 1950’s, and it now has very little to show for its’ past. Today, the once flourishing mining town only pulls out a small portion of gold compared to what it used to generate, and some disused gold mines now only sell rubble.

A second factor that has contributed to Brakpan’s sense of preservation is the development of Carnival Mall and Casino, which conveniently lies just off the highway a few kilometers away from Brakpan Central. All the major chains and retail shops have moved to the mall and, as a result, the town centre has been left untouched and undeveloped, stunting it economically and leaving its inhabitants with little opportunities.

And yet there are many faces to modern Brakpan. Young girls push prams while karaoke competition winners don’t get their promised prizes. Pirated DVD’s get sold on the streets, crippling the nearby video shops that rent out older movies. There is a sense of nostalgia that remains and is reflected in the buildings and in the people. This is a place where you can still enjoy school and church fete’s, rugby matches, old bars, sokkie jols, biker rallies, fishing and braaiing at the Brakpan Dam; all of which are a part of the local’s lives.

Here there is a peacefulness and relaxed country town feel, without the stress about what tomorrow may bring.  The people of Brakpan live in the now but are still bound by the constraints of the past.

The images presented here are printed on Multigrade V1 FB Fibre matt photographic paper. Exhibition prints are 40cm by 40cm in size in an edition of 10.

Bio

Marc Shoul lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa. He was born in 1975 in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, South Africa and graduated (with honors in photography) from the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in 1999. Since then, he has had several exhibitions of his work including group shows at the Arts Association of Bellville, Fusion (1999), Artscape, Mental Health, (2001) Cape Town, Month of Photography, Detour, (2002), Cape Town, Photo ZA, Obsess (2004) and Resolution Gallery, Faces (2008) in Johannesburg as well as at the World Health Organization TB exhibition in India (2004). Solo exhibitions of ‘Beyond Walmer’ were held by the Association of Visual Arts Gallery in Cape Town (2000) and Natal Society of Arts, Durban (2001).  “Flatlands” a solo exhibition was also held at the Association of Visual Arts in Cape Town (2009) with help from the National Arts Council. Shoul was also featured in the AGFA Youth International Photojournalism Publication 1999. He also reached the finals of the Absa L’Atelier 2009.  Flatlands showed at KZNSA in Durban, South Africa and Galerie Quai 1 in Vevey, Switzerland in 2010. Shoul was invited to hold a workshop at the Vevey School of Photography on the 2010. Shoul was also been included in After A at the Report Atri Festival, Italy, June 2010 curated by Federica Angelucci. Beyond Walmer is on show at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum June-August 2010. Brakpan (work in progress),Shoul has also been included in the Bonaini Africa 2010 Festival of Photography, Cape Town Castle of Good Hope and Museum Africa, Johannesburg. Brakpan (work in progress) was included in 10 a group exhibition at the PhotoMarket Workshop, Johannesburg, 2010. Brakpan in 2011 won the 1st prize at the Winephoto.

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum added “Beyond Walmer” to its permanent collection (2007).

For the last ten years, Marc has worked for various local and international magazines such as Time, Colors, Wired, Blueprint, Dazed and Confused, Design Indaba, World Health Organization, Mother Jones, Stern, Gala, De Spiegel, Financial Times Magazine, Monocle, Smithsonian and The Telegraph Magazine, He has also shot for many advertising clients and agencies.

He has recently completed a project named ‘Flatlands’ in the Johannesburg inner city.  He is now working on a new body of work in Brakpan on the East Rand where he is exploring the city’s way of life and its people.

He is interested in exploring theams of social relevance and changes within his country and further a field.

Shoul works largely in black and white, using a medium format film camera and natural light printed on Fiber photographic paper.

 

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Marc Shoul

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When British painter Lucian Freud died in July 2011, TIME’s art critic Richard Lacayo wrote that Freud “proved with a bang the continuing vitality of the figurative tradition in art.” A prodigious realist painter, who many considered one of the greatest British artists of his generation, Freud began his career using sharp, tight lines. In the 1950s, he set aside his thin brushes for thicker, hog’s-bristle brushes that Lacayo wrote “pushed pigment across the canvas in rich, thick flourishes.”

Freud painted dozens of nudes and loved subjects with copious amounts of flesh. He took long periods to complete portraits and required his subjects to commit incredible amounts of time to the process. In 2007, the Telegraph chronicled Freud’s painting of art handler Rita Kirby, a process that took 16 months and required Kirby to pose for him seven nights a week on top of her day job.

A new exhibition at London’s Pallant House Gallery features photographs by David Dawson, who was Freud’s model and studio assistant for 20 years. The show features some of Freud’s key paintings alongside Dawson’s photographs of the artist at work in his studio. In addition to photographs of the painting process, Dawson captured intimate moments of Freud’s life, including the application of shaving cream with one of his large brushes and cuddling Kate Moss in bed.

What emerges is a portrait of an artist who took painstaking care to capture intimate details in his paintings where the point of completion was different for each one. “Freud’s criterion is that he feels he’s finished when he gets the impression he’s working on somebody else’s painting,” Martin Gayford wrote in the Telegraph in 2007. Freud often looked inward. His 2005 self-portrait—one of many he did in his lifetime—is one of his most recognized paintings. But perhaps the most complete portrait of Freud will emerge after his death in pictures from Dawson’s lens, instead of the artist’s brush.

David Dawson: Working with Lucian Freud is on view at the Pallant House Gallery through May 20. An exhibition of photographs by David Dawson will be available for sale at Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert through March 2.

Nate Rawlings is a reporter at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @naterawlings

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Final Fantasy 13 reflected the character of its heroine, Lightning: an elite, standoffish soldier who would let nothing come between her and her mission. The game presented a journey so focused and linear that its first 25 hours could be mapped out as an unbroken corridor. And Lightning's purity of focus saw Square Enix discard many Final Fantasy tropes so she could pursue her goals without distraction.

The series may reinvent itself with each new entry, but the games have always been tied together by common motifs: crystals, summons, Chocobos, airships, Yoshitaka Amano's Klimpt-esque concept art, and that tinkling harpsichord arpeggio. In Final Fantasy 13, both towns and exploration were discarded as extraneous trappings, unnecessary to Lightning's mission or - as it was referred to in the game's terminology - her Focus. Rarely has a game been so focused as to discard so much of its own heritage.

Serah, Lightning's younger sister and heroine of Final Fantasy 13-2 - a rare sequel to a mainline Final Fantasy title - is a primary school teacher in a seaside village. She has none of the steel composure of her elder sibling, none of that dogged determination that makes Lightning such a difficult character to empathise with. And the game world reflects this from the first moment.

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Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland on May 21, 2011 has caused hundreds of travel delays. The ash cloud forced U.S. President Barack Obama to shorten a visit to Ireland and has raised some fears of a repeat of last year's huge travel disruptions across Europe when emissions from Eyjafjalljokull stranded millions of passengers. Although this disruption is said to be stronger than that of Eyiafjalljokull, it is not expected to have the same impact. Take a look back at two Big Picture posts from the 2010 Icelandic volcano eruption: Iceland's disruptive volcano and More from Eyiafjallajokull. -- Paula Nelson (24 photos total)
A plane flies past a smoke plume resulting from the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, May 21, 2011. Airlines began canceling flights to Britain because of the ash cloud from the volcano reaching its airspace, although experts expected no repeat of travel chaos from the eruption of Eyjafjallajokull a year ago. (Olafur Sigurjonsson/Reuters)

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