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A picture of Chantal Ughi, a Muay Thai boxer who is the subject of a photoessay by Giulio di Sturco. Giulio, a Reportage contributor, won a gold medal in the sports category of the Prix de la Photographie, Paris (Px3) for this work. Of his subject he writes:

From the East Village of Manhattan to Bangkok, a career in the underground cinema to the Thai boxing ring. It’s the story of Chantal Ughi, angel face with a background in fashion and now world champion muay thai, a sport she was struck by when she saw for the first time a fight in a gym in New York. After seven years in the Big Apple with different experiences in the music, art , fashion, and movies, Chantal dropped everything to attend a course of martial arts. She was supposed to stay in Bangkok for four weeks. Four years later, at the price of enormous sacrifices and strict self-discipline, she can say that her dream has come true.

Px3 also awarded Giulio an honorable mention for his work on violence related to the cocoa bean industry in Madagascar. See some of that work here. Giulio is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and his work has appeared in publications such as Time Magazine, Vanity Fair, L’espresso and more. View more of his work on the Reportage Web site.

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We've already shown you the selection French news outlet AFP made, but the most anticipated photographic round up of the year arguably comes from TIME Magazine. Despite ten percent of all of the photographs made in the entire history of photography being taken last year, the magazine managed to narrow their choices down to just 10, delivering strong emotions with depictions of war and natural disasters as well as presidential elections and a gravity-defying contemporary artist from China.

Photographer, in order of appearance: Stephen Wilkes, Bernat Armangue, Rodrigo Abd, Goran Tomasevic, Martin Schoeller, Parrish Ruiz de Velasco, Dominic Nahr, RJ Sangosti, Callie Shell, Francois Mori.


www.time.com

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Joao Pina

Shadow Of The Condor

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“Operation Condor” was a 1970s secret military plan sponsored by the United States during the Dirty War years, which aimed to eliminate the political opponents to the right wing military regimes. It took place in six countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay.

It officially started in late 1975, when the secret services had a meeting in Santiago, Chile to define a strategy to use common resources and exchange information, man power and techniques to execute the plan. Thousands of people, mostly left wing workers and students, were arrested, tortured and executed, leading to 60,000 deaths, although a final number could never be confirmed because of the number of mass executions.

This project aims to show the scars and enormous impact left on the survivors and families of those who were killed. From the Amazon jungle in Brazil to the cold lands of Patagonia, thousands of victims still lay buried in unmarked graves, and the survivors struggle to cope with their memories.

Since the beginning of this investigation back in 2005, I have begun to take interviews with victims and families of those who disappeared, and have also visited sites of imprisonment, executions, and burials. I believe that by making these images I can help build a collective memory about the people behind this secretive operation who have never been held accountable.

I will return to the region and continue to build this body of work in Bolivia and Paraguay. These two countries still require much time to research and photograph. I will talk to survivors like Martin Almada, a lawyer who found the archives where thousands of documents prove the existence of “Operation Condor” in Paraguay.

No complete documentary project of this scope in all six countries has ever been completed, and none relying on photographs has been attempted. I hope to help generations of South Americans to know and understand the story of their countries.

 

Bio

Joao Pina was born in Lisbon, Portugal, in 1980, he began working as a photographer at age of 18.

His images have been published in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Time Magazine, Newsweek, Stern, GEO, El Pais, D Magazine, Visão and others.

In 2007 he published his first book “Por teu livre pensamento” featuring 25 former Portuguese political prisoners. The book inspired an Amnesty International advertising campaign that won a Lion d’Or award, at the Cannes International Festival of Creativity 2011.

He has also been awarded the Estação Imagem grant in 2010 and a finalist for the Henri Nannen, Care award. Until 2010 he lived in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he continues to document the remnants of “Operation Condor”, a secret military operation to destroy the political opposition to the dictatorships in South America in the 1970s.

Lately he has been a privileged observer of the “Arab Spring”, traveling on several occasions to Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, while continuing his work in Latin America.

 

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A huge, colorful mural of the men Egyptian youth activists know as “felool”—regime remnants—adorns a building’s wall on Mohamed Mahmoud Street in downtown Cairo. Branching off of the now iconic Tahrir Square, Mohamed Mahmoud leads to the dreaded Interior Ministry. A number of bloody clashes between protesters and Egyptian security forces have taken place here in the year and a half since a popular uprising ended the 30-year dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak and launched the Arab world’s largest country into a tumultuous transition. To Egypt’s budding generation of revolutionary street artists, these walls are prime real estate for political expression.

Omar Fathi, the 26-year-old art student, who painted the mural with a set of cheap plastic paints last February, conceived of the idea after a deadly soccer riot had led to another series of clashes between police and protesters, leaving more than 80 people dead. Like much of his art, it was an image borne of frustration. Many of the youth protesters had blamed the ruling military and the police forces under its command for the deadly soccer riot and the ensuing violence as anger spread to the streets. To Fathi, it was further evidence of the state’s failure to govern and protect—something he had grown accustomed to under Mubarak, but that he and other youth activists and members of his “Revolution Artists’ Union” say has only continued under military rule. “Basically it represents the situation we are in, nothing has changed since the fall of the regime,” he says. “It’s the same leadership—the face has changed, but the rest is still the same.”

The mural depicts a split face—on the right, the scowling visage of ousted President Hosni Mubarak; and on the left, the man he once appointed to run his military, Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi. As the head of Egypt’s powerful military council, Tantawi has been Egypt’s de facto ruler since Mubarak stepped down in February 2011.

Shortly after Fathi painted his masterpiece, someone—he suspects from the military —painted over it. To spite them, he painted it again. When it was painted over a second time, he re-painted it a third, this time adding the faces of two presidential candidates, Amr Moussa, and Ahmed Shafik. Both men had served in Mubarak’s regime. And the run-off to the presidential election this month pit Ahmed Shafik against a candidate from the once-banned Muslim Brotherhood, in a tense face-off that some activists characterized as a battle between the old order and the new; the military regime versus the revolution. In the end, the Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsy won. But Tantawi and his military council have ensured that Morsy only wields certain presidential powers; the military controls the rest. And Fathi says he’ll keep painting. “Our contribution [to the revolution] is to portray the demands of the revolution through art. This has been our role since the eighteen days [of the uprising],” he says. “We serve the revolution through art, and we will keep illustrating our demands.”

Sharaf al-Hourani is a news assistant for TIME Magazine in Cairo
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TEDxWaterloo - Taylor Jones - Dear Photograph

"Now and then you hear a story that restores your faith in the internet, both as a global sharing tool that can be used as a force for good and as a means by which a moment of serendipity and a good idea can bring fame and fortune to an individual," said the UK Huffington Post. That individual is Taylor Jones. As the 22-year-old founder of the worldwide phenomenon dearphotograph.com, he is responsible for a site that has, in just six short months, become a conduit for the memories and emotions of millions of people. CBS named Dear Photograph the #1 website in 2011, and TIME Magazine included it as their #7 pick of the top 50 websites favorites. Now Taylor has a book deal with HarperCollins for the first Dear Photograph book, with never-before-seen photos, to be published later this year. Taylor admits he is a "consummate idea guy" who has always been active in the digital world. His other passions? Music, being Canadian and hockey. A graduate of Conestoga College's advertising program, Taylor currently resides in Kitchener, Ontario. "Dear Photograph started off as a nice nostalgic blog with six pictures of old family snaps lined up in their original setting. Then it went viral." The Guardian. ---- In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local <b>...</b>
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noiseymusic:

US Army Infantryman Kyle Hockenberry, photographed by Laura Rauch.

Tattoos have always been linked to conflict. In the 18th century, British explorer and cartographer Captain James Cook returned to London with a crew of sailors who had been inked up by natives from the South Pacific. Today, soldiers all over the Middle East mark their bodies with tattoos to commemorate fallen comrades, mark divisions and units, and remind them of their loved ones back home.

This is an image of 19-year-old US Army Infantryman Kyle Hockenberry being treated following an explosion that cost him both of his legs and one arm. The photo was taken for a military newspaper, and went on to win photographer Laura Rauch an SPJ award. Tattooed across Hockenberry’s ribcage are the words “For Those I Love, I Will Sacrifice.” These are lyrics from “Hallowed Be Thy Name,” a track from Indecision’s 1998 record To Live And Die In New York City.

Indecision was one of the most prolific and outspoken hardcore bands in NYHC history. In addition to speaking out in favor of animal rights, vegetarianism, and social justice, the band toured five continents over its eight-year history, and was the first American band to play Croatia after the 1995 War Of Independence. The band was founded by Justin Lee Brannan, who has since worn many hats, including stints at Bear Stearns, the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists, and the Bank Of New York. He’s currently the President of the Bay Ridge Democrats in Brooklyn. 

Brannan wrote these words when he was sixteen years old, and was stunned to see them again after the image was picked up by Time Magazine. Yesterday, on the 68th anniversary of D-Day, I gave Brannan a call to understand what it feels like to see his words in such an off-putting context.

NOISEY: So how did you first come across this photograph?
Justin Lee Brannan: It was on an insider US military blog and a friend sent it to me. It completely blew my mind. He had gotten the tattoo two weeks before he was deployed. He’s a 19-year-old kid. The thing is, lots of people have these words tattooed, and I never knew what to say over the years when people would come up to me and show it to me. But to see it like that, for once in my life I was speechless.

I felt an instant connection with Kyle. The first thing I wanted to find out if he was alive, and how I could get in touch with him.

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Residents of the besieged neighborhood of Khadeiye run through the streets to avoid snipers.  Sheets are hung and moved as the snipers move to try and block their view .
One of the members of the Free Army of Syria, and formerly a soldier in the Syrian Army, looks around a corner after hearing shots fired nearby in Khadeiya.  The collection of volunteers guard their neighborhood from inside houses as the Syrian Army fires at them from across the streets and high locations.
A well known wedding singer, whispers the words of a revolutionary song into the ears of children so they can sing them.
Water, and electricity have been cut since Khadeiya was taken by the opposition.  Now electricity is snuck in on clandestine power lines and water is distributed from old wells.
A member of the Free Syrian Army approaches the border of Khadeiya where the Syrian Army is firing on them.  Scattered machine gun fire can be heard coming from both sides but the real fear comes with the sound of artillery and RPGs.
Families have made a refugee camp out of an orphanage in Homs.  The only requirement is that a member of the family must have died or be in jail.  This room houses three families from beside Baba Amr, Homs.  After the fled the violence their houses were completely ransacked, allegedly by pro-government thugs.
In a house on the border of Baba Amr, Homs bullet holes riddle the walls and furniture.  Blocks of the city were abandoned and most shops were closed.
A small party is held in the center of Khadeiya where men and their children  come mainly to sing anti-government songs and dance.
One of the soldiers of the Syrian Free Army is brought into a makeshift hospital after he was hurt in an explosion.  The small clinic is the only one left after 3 other hospitals and clinics were shelled.
One of the officers of the Free Syrian Army sits with his family in their home in Khadeiya.  He is unusual for keeping his family in the middle of the bullet riddled neighborhood.  But he is too well know as a member of the opposition and as he says
Many of the remaining people and cars of Kahdeiya have been shot multiple times.    This soldier showed me 3 bullet holes.  One doctor showed me the 9 times he has been wounded while retrieving patients in their makeshift ambulance.
The main square of Khadeiya is pitted with holes from mortars and explosives.  At one time this square was used for organizing anti-government protests where many were originally killed.
A small party is held in the center of Khadeiya where men and their children  come mainly to sing anti-government songs and dance.
One of the residents of Khadeiya, Homs was shot in the legs by a sniper after leaving the evening protest.   After being patched up in the clinic he returned to the protest to tell his friends he is ok.
Damascus, Syria

Draft.

This report does not give an accurate description of all Syria’s current complexity. It is a look at one opposition neighborhood for one day.

After a year of intense fighting and low level suppression many parts of Khaldeya have bullet holes, the cars, the walls, the water tanks, the people. This suburb of Homs has been emptied of families and filled with bullet holes. The doctor that runs out to pick up wounded has 9 bullet holes. Sheets are hung in the street to block the view of snipers are like swiss cheese.

I was given one of the rare 7 day visas to enter Syria as a journalist. I wasn’t the best journalist to be sent, my expertise is Egypt, my Arabic language is Egyptian. But thanks to a good fixer and some digging we were able to travel around Homs relatively freely.

Getting into Khaldeya required a local guide and some quick driving down a road with a history of snipers. The bullet holes in other cars confirmed that sometimes they were shot. While in the neighborhood shots ring out at irregular intervals

The rebels are very aware of the Syrian government’s storyline that they are gangs of terrorists and were more than willing to show us around. Often when I start talking with a soldier he will pull out his army ID and go into the story of how he escaped.

Most of the soldiers claim that their weapons came from defecting soldiers, though they have had to buy ammunition from anywhere they can.

There was one former Syrian Army officer who told of how his brother was walking home from the first protest in Khaldeya when a sniper shot him through the stomach. At that moment he decided to defect and join the rebels. Now he is too well known so he stays with his family, unwilling to send them away. “I would rather have them die here with me than away from me” he says.

To defend their neighborhood the volunteers have smashed holes through the walls of the homes. A maze of paths are opened and closed as they move around the inside. As I move with them they aren’t so afraid of bullets as of the RPGs.

In one of the few houses with electricty a few volunteers write songs for the evening’s protest. It’s an almost daily event of a few men and children gathering in a central location. A couple of famous wedding singers lead the festivities.

One of the residents left the party early, half an hour later he was driven back in an ambulance, with fresh bandages. A sniper had shot him through the legs on his way home.

The rebellion in Syria is one of the most complex of the revolutions of the Arab spring. It isn’t a peacefull protest in a square, or violent fight from east to west, or easily described along majority, minority sectarian lines. It has many fronts, many divided families, is partially peaceful, partially violent, and has no clear majority of people or power. It also has many neighbors that want to influence the outcome.

This complexity is undercovered partially because there were relatively few foreign journalists based in Syria to start with and now it is excedingly hard for journalists to get in for long term coverage.

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TEDxWarwick - Kerry Kirwan - Lean, Mean and Green

Dr Kerry Kirwan is an Associate Professor at WMG, University of Warwick. He specialises in sustainable materials and was recently involved in building Eco One, an environmentally friendly racing car made from recycled materials and fuelled by biodiesel derived from waste food products, including chocolate and beef fat. Eco One was featured as one of TIME Magazine's Top 50 Global Inventions of 2009. He has developed the biodegradable "Sunflower Phone" that allows mobile phone users to grow plants from their discarded mobile phone cases through the encapsulation of a small seed in a visible window, subsequently prompting them to dispose of electronics in a responsible manner. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
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If you're one of those people who tend to lose their phone shortly after putting it down, then you'll want to read this. According to a new study, if you lose your smartphone, you have a 50/50 chance of getting it back. But chances are much higher -- nearly 100 percent -- that whoever retrieves it will try to access your private information and apps.

According to a study by Symantec, 96 percent of people who picked up the lost phones tried to access personal or business data on the device. In 45 percent of cases, people tried to access the corporate email client on the device.

"This finding demonstrates the high risks posed by an unmanaged, lost smartphone to sensitive corporate information," according to the report. "It demonstrates the need for proper security policies and device/data management."

Symantec called the study the "Honey Stick Project." In this case the honey on a stick consisted of 50 smartphones that were intentionally left in New York, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Ottowa, Canada. The phones were deposited in spots that were easy to see, and where it would be plausible for someone to forget them, including food courts and public restrooms.

None of the phones had security features, like passwords, to block access. Each was loaded with dummy apps and files that contained no real information, but which had names like "Social Networking" and "Corporate Email" that made it easy for the person who found it to understand what each app did. Each phone also was loaded with programs to track what finders did with the devices, and to send that information to the researchers.

Among people who found the phones, 72 percent tried to access photos, 57 percent tried to open a file called "Saved Passwords," and 43 percent tried to open an app called "Online Banking." Most of the apps on the phones were protected by passwords, but the username and password fields were already filled out, so that users could simply press a button to access them. Well over half of the people who discovered the phones, 66 percent, clicked those buttons to try and start the programs. The fact that the finders had to click a button to access the apps indicates that their attempts were likely intentional.

"This might be considered to be an unethical access attempt," according to the study. Also disturbing, only half the people who found the phones ever tried to contact the rightful owner, even though the owner's phone number and email address were prominently listed in the phones' contact lists. "This finding highlights the fact that in many cases, regaining possession of lost device may be a losing battle," according to the study.

If this sends shivers down your spine, here are some tips for how to protect yourself:

--Always protect your phone with a password or a "draw to unlock" pattern.

--Use security software designed specifically for smartphones to lock up programs on your phone. Some of these programs can be used to help locate the phone, or to wipe its memory from remote locations.

--Don't lose your cell phone. This falls under the category of "Well, duh." Nobody loses a smartphone on purpose, obviously. But try to make sure you keep it in you pocket or purse when not in use.

--Companies that issue phones to their employees should make sure to train workers on security, and should secure every phone with passwords.

This article originally appeared on Credit.com.

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