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By THE NEW YORK TIMES

With more people reading the Times on smart phones, you can now experience Lens on the New York Times iPad/iPhone or Android app.

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behanceteam

crnaston

Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston in Fast Company on how the show’s staff collaborates:

Whenever anything doesn’t quite sit well, you just call it a “bump,” which is a more palatable way of saying “I have a problem with this.” But if you start a sentence with “I have a problem with what you wrote, and here’s how we’re gonna fix it,” as opposed to, “Something bumped me, and I have a pitch.” It’s not saying, “I’m right, you’re wrong, and here’s what we’re gonna do.” It’s saying, “This is a problem for me and if you’re invested in this storytelling, you want to smooth out the rough edges.”

You want to be able to satisfy because I’m not coming as an empty vessel to work. I’m coming because I’m passionately involved in this and I have something to offer. So do you as the writer and you as the director. Together we’re stronger. We do a dance.

Read the Emmy Award-winner’s entire interview at Fast Company.

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Adrianne Jeffries

Atm_robbers_large

Defendants Elvis Rafael Rodriguez and Emir Yasser Yeje posing with approximately $40,000 with cash. Source: US Attorney, Eastern District of New York

If you’d been waiting for the ATM inside the deli at East 59th and Third in Manhattan on Tuesday, February 19th around 9:24PM, you would have been annoyed. A young man in a black beanie and puffy black jacket made seven withdrawals in a row, stuffing around $5,620 into his blue backpack. The man wasted no time. He exited the deli and headed up five blocks to repeat the process at four more ATMs, finishing his route at a Chase bank at 69th and Third at 9:55PM, where he made four withdrawals totaling $4,000.

While the man in the black beanie was beelining along the Upper East Side, seven...

Continue reading…

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behanceteam

“I use a trick with co-workers when we’re trying to decide where to eat for lunch and no one has any ideas. I recommend McDonald’s. An interesting thing happens. Everyone unanimously agrees that we can’t possibly go to McDonald’s, and better lunch suggestions emerge. Magic!” — Jon Bell

Jon Bell utilizes this tactic, what he calls “The McDonald’s Theory” to help break deadlock. It’s a simple technique to surface ideas from an otherwise timid room. He continues:

The next time a project is being discussed in its early stages, grab a marker, go to the board, and throw something up there. The idea will probably be stupid, but that’s good! McDonald’s Theory teaches us that it will trigger the group into action.

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