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Original author: 
WSJ Staff

Cast and crew rehearsed for the 67th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall in New York, N.Y., airing live this Sunday. Bryan Derballa, on assignment for WSJ, captured these behind the scenes images of Thursday's rehearsal.

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Original author: 
WSJ Staff

In today’s pictures, a man tends to one of his goats in Ireland, injured people receive treatment after an explosion in Syria, a holy man helps his adopted child into a yoga headstand in India, and more.

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Samsung has built itself a Android dynasty with its Galaxy phones.

Casey Johnston

Over the last three years, Samsung has risen to become the unequivocal success story for the Android platform. Not only is it the only profitable manufacturer, but it has also spent the last couple of years striking more and more fear into the heart of its mobile arch nemesis, Apple.

As its competitors sprayed Android handsets over the retail scene like buckshot with micro-variations and diverse UI skins, Samsung quickly focused and put most of its effort into creating and promoting a flagship line of handsets. The company set aside support for increasingly niche features like hardware keyboards or confusing, subtle model tweaks in favor of focusing on one quality handset.

Now, the Samsung Galaxy line is unquestionably the most successful one in the history of Android. The most recent version, the Galaxy S III, even briefly displaced the iPhone as the top-selling smartphone for the third quarter of 2012, according to one source. Even Google is reportedly afraid of how successful Samsung has become with its mobile business.

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 From Broadway to the Battery


This is an art book done in line art by German illustrator Robinson (1910-1994). On the book jacket, it says he has created hundreds of thousands of drawings, not just for New York. That sounds incredible but not hard to believe when you go through the pages.

It was first published in 1967 and this is a very welcome reprint. Looking at the illustrations is like traveling back in time to 60s New York, Manhattan precisely. The impressive skyscrapers were already up, and the 60s cars are all still crowding the streets.

The aerial drawings of Manhattan are breathtaking in astonishing detail. There are many in the book. New York Line By Line only has 64 pages, but the format is huge, great for showing off the line art.

I've been to Manhattan on holiday before and these drawings gives me fond memories of the place. Many are from the exact spot where I stood. There are drawings from the top of Empire State Building, at Park Avenue, Chinatown, Grand Central Station, NY Public Library, Bryant Park, Radio City Music Hall, St. Patrick's Cathedral,Rockefeller Center, Time Square, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Central Park, Kennedy Airport and more.

Through the drawings, you can see how New York has changed with its people and landscape. Buildings at Time Square were just a few floors tall back then. Today, their top can't even be captured in photographs.

I like the last section where they compare numbers from the 60s New York with present day. There were 3000 shoe stores back then and now only 620. It's interesting to see how businesses have evolved through those numbers, many which changed drastically.

This is an impressive and astonishing book.

If you want to travel even further back in time, check out Denys Wortman's New York.

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New York, Line by Line: From Broadway to the Battery is available at Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository (US | UK)

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

 From Broadway to the Battery

Visit Amazon to check out more reviews.

If you buy from any links on the blog, I get a little commission that helps me get more art books to feature.

This book is available at:
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A young man rode past art hanging as part of the ‘Works in Progress’ installation at the Atlantic Yards site in Brooklyn on Oct. 19. ArtBridge installed large reproductions of work from 20 Brooklyn artists on the scaffolding surrounding the stadium’s construction site. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal )


Handlers walked camels outside the Radio City Music Hall on Oct. 17. Three camels, two sheep, and a donkey were on hand for rehearsal of the Radio City Christmas Spectacular, which starts Nov. 11 and runs through Jan 2, 2012. (Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal)


The Jacob Jefferies Band played at Rockwood Music Hall on the Lower East Side during the CMJ Musical Festival on Oct. 19. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal )


The dance troupe Douglas Dunn & Dancers performed on stage at a block party celebrating the 50th anniversary of the La Mama Theatre in Manhattan on Oct. 16. The off-off-Broadway theater was founded in 1961 by Ellen Stewart. (Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal)


Barneys New York is marking 20 years in the business for designer Christian Louboutin. Here, one section of a window installation in Manhattan on Oct. 20. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal )


Pedestrians walked in the rain in Manhattan on Oct. 19. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal)


Amanda Schachter and Alex Levi of Slo Architecture put the finishing touches on Harvest Dome, a giant cupola made of recycled umbrellas that will float at Inwood Hill Park later this fall. (Daniella Zalcman for The Wall Street Journal )


Benjamin Gudzy, 9, of West Orange, N.J., and Logan Rinaldi, 11, of Yonkers, N.Y., tried to look into a mausoleum during a scavenger hunt at the Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx on Oct. 16. Kids looked for gravestones of New York politicians, oak and maple tree leaves, and distinctive monuments. (Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal)


Puppeteer Ronny Wasserstrom entertained kids at the block party celebrating the 50th anniversary of the La Mama Theatre in Manhattan on Oct. 16. (Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal)


Bumble and bumble instructor Sabrina Michals, left, showed an Afghan woman styling techniques as part of a training program for Afghan entrepreneursm sponsored by the U.S. State Department and BPeace. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal )


The Madison lunchbox with chicken at Duo Restaurant & Lounge, 72 Madison Ave. in New York, N.Y. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal)


Brian Shimkovitz, a DJ and blogger who uses the name Awesome Tapes From Africa, worked in his Lower East Side apartment on Oct. 14. (Ramin Talaie for The Wall Street Journal)


Trainer Clif Spade at the Kiwi Sweat Spin Class inside the Chelsea Market in New York on Oct. 17. (Ramsay De Give for The Wall Street Journal)


Alex Hutton, a scenic artist, worked on a set piece at the Production Resource Group facility in New Windsor, N.Y., where the set for the Broadway show ‘Godspell’ is being designed and manufactured. (Rob Bennett for The Wall Street Journal)


From left to right, Big Bird, Bill Irwin and Joey from ‘War Horse’ during the curtain call of ‘Puppet Palooza,’ the New Victory Theatre’s annual New 42nd Street Gala, on Oct. 17. (Astrid Stawiarz for The Wall Street Journal)


Singer Jon Bon Jovi at Soul Kitchen in Red Bank, N.J, on Oct. 19. (Amy Sussman for The Wall Street Journal )


Aschee Waterman, 11, center, and Amira Rosenbush, 15, right, painted on a roll-up gate as part of an interactive show at a pop-up gallery in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, Brooklyn, on Oct. 18. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)


Kawaun Corprein, a student at Alain L. Locke Elementary School in Harlem, learned the basic techniques of rugby on Oct. 19. (Ramsay de Give for The Wall Street Journal)

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Billy Stinson (L) comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood August 28, 2011 in Nags Head, North Carolina. The cottage, built in 1903 and destroyed yesterday by Hurricane Irene, was one of the first vacation cottages built on Albemarle Sound in Nags Head. Stinson has owned the home, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, since 1963. “We were pretending, just for a moment, that the cottage was still behind us and we were just sitting there watching the sunset,” said Erin afterward.

Hurricane Irene moved along the east coast causing heavy flooding damage as far north as Vermont and shutting down the entire New York mass transit system.

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