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In the North of Sweden, in Lappland, there is a university spinoff company named BehavioSec that decides you are you (or that a person using your computer is not you) by the way you type. Not the speed, but rhythm and style quirks, are what they detect and use for authentication. BehavioSec CEO/CTO Neil Costigan obviously knows far more about this than we do, which is why Tim Lord met with him at the 2013 RSA Conference and had him tell us exactly how BehavioSec's system works. As usual, we've provided both a video and a transcript (There's a small "Show/Hide Transcript" link immediately below the video) so you can either watch or read, whichever you prefer.

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Soft Metals we’re a underrated gift last year with their label Captured Tracks producing soo many good releases in the past year. I had to share this for 2 reasons and you’re going to love the 2nd one probably more: 1st. the synth choices 2nd: it’s a free download here.

Cascine seems to always find bands that sound like they make all their music in a ray from a sun burst in the clouds of Scandinavia. The vox echo in the intro ends up sounding soo good once you get into the thick of the track especially with the strings and synth piano part that comes in at 2:01.

Dntel did it, he made one of the most honest sounding tracks i’ve heard in a number of years, nothing tied to this that sounds like it was forced or rethought because others will hear it, the soundtrack to claymation from a 70s PBS cartoon, soo happy its as look as it is.

I overlooked posting this gem from Burial, everyone’s probably heard it blah blah blah but its worth the post. He probably doesn’t even look at his facebook or read what people write about him, atleast I like to think that he’s this pure yet distant soul.

Nice little side note, we made it to over 30 minutes today on 4 songs, pretty nice I have to say so myself.

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A nighttime view of Western Europe taken by the Earth-orbiting International Space Station crew shows the ISS’s robotic arm and solar arrays in the foreground. Belgium and the Netherlands can be seen at bottom center, the North Sea at left center, and Scandinavia at right center. ISS crew member Don Petit fleshes out the reality of life in space by sharing physical details–including the smells, sounds and mind-boggling views on his Letters to Earth blog. Mr. Petit shares his privileged viewpoint in a recent entry:

“From orbit, the more you know about our planet, the more you can see. You see all the geological features described in textbooks. You see fault zones, moraines, basins, ranges, impact craters, dikes, sills, braided channels, the strike and dip of layered rocks, folding, meanders, oxbow lakes, slumps, slides, mud flows, deltas, alluvial fans, glaciers, karst topography, cirques, tectonicplates, rifts zones, cinder cones, crater lakes, fossil sea shores, lava flows, volcanic plumes, fissures, eruptions, dry lakes, inverted topography, latteric soils, and many more.

You see clouds of every description and combination: nimbus, cumulus, stratus, nimbo-cumulus, nimbo-stratus, cirrus, thunderheads, and typhoons, sometimes with clockwise rotation, sometimes with counter-clockwise. You notice patterns: Clouds over cold oceans look different than clouds over warm oceans. Sometimes the continents are all cloud-covered, so you have no recognizable land-mass to help you gauge where you are. If you see a crisscross of jet contrails glistening in the sun above the clouds, you know you are over the United States.”

You can keep up with the current six-member expedition crew on board the ISS by following the ISS blog on NASA.gov, or by following @NASA_Astronauts on Twitter.

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TEDxUniversityofGothenburg - Erika Harlitz - In Cod We Trust

Wherein lays the historical foundation for the overfishing of today? Erika Harlitz received her Ph.D. with the dissertation Urban Systems and State Formation in Scandinavia. A Study of the Rise and Fall of Lödöse, c. 1050-1646 at the Department for Historical Studies, University of Gothenburg. She is now a member of the maritime research network Triton. In thespirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
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Autumn is a season of frosty mornings, festivals like Halloween and Mexico's Dia de los Muertos, and of course, spectacular foliage. Around the north, people have begun to see their breath form misty clouds in the chilly morning air, snows have fallen early, and preparation for winter is well under way. Collected here is a second group of images of this year's autumn from around the northern hemisphere -- the earlier entry can be seen here. [37 photos]

The last of the summer roses are dusted with a coating of frost as the first freezing temperatures descend on Britain, on November 7, 2011 in Knutsford, England. The roses are the last blooms to survive the Summer at Curbishleys specialist rose nursery in Cheshire. (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

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No one knows why they do it. Yet each fall, thousands of starlings dance in the twilight above Gretna, Scotland. The birds gather in magical shape-shifting flocks called murmurations, having migrated in the millions from Russia and Scandinavia to escape winter’s bite. Scientists aren’t sure how they do it, either. Even complex algorithmic models haven’t yet explained the starlings’ acrobatics, which rely on the tiny bird’s quicksilver reaction time of under 100 milliseconds to avoid aerial collisions—and predators—in the giant flock. Despite their show of force in the dusky sky, starlings have declined significantly in the UK in recent years, perhaps because of a drop in nesting sites. The birds still roost in several of Britain’s rural pastures, however, settling down to sleep (and chatter) after the evening’s ballet.

Sonia van Gilder Cooke is a reporter in TIME’s London Bureau. Follow her on Twitter at @svangildercooke.

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Barely a year after a similar eruption in Iceland forced the biggest closure of European airspace since World War II, the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland on May 21, 2011 has caused hundreds of travel delays. The ash cloud forced U.S. President Barack Obama to shorten a visit to Ireland and has raised some fears of a repeat of last year's huge travel disruptions across Europe when emissions from Eyjafjalljokull stranded millions of passengers. Although this disruption is said to be stronger than that of Eyiafjalljokull, it is not expected to have the same impact. Take a look back at two Big Picture posts from the 2010 Icelandic volcano eruption: Iceland's disruptive volcano and More from Eyiafjallajokull. -- Paula Nelson (24 photos total)
A plane flies past a smoke plume resulting from the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, May 21, 2011. Airlines began canceling flights to Britain because of the ash cloud from the volcano reaching its airspace, although experts expected no repeat of travel chaos from the eruption of Eyjafjallajokull a year ago. (Olafur Sigurjonsson/Reuters)

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Jon Magnusson / Getty Images Contributor

The eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano sends thousands of tonnes of volcanic ash into the sky on May 23 above Iceland. The cloud has forced the closure of Icelandic airspace and spread fears of a repeat of the global travel chaos that was caused by last year's Icelandic eruption, although authorities insist that this Grimsvotn poses a lesser threat.

Rich Shulman writes

This looks a bit like a tornado, but it's a low angle view of the volcanic ash cloud. Full story.

Fears about the cloud forced President Obama to cut his visit to Ireland short and fly to London.

Yesterday's PhotoBlog post.


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