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Before there was Romney the presidential candidate, there was Romney the romantic. In this week’s cover story, Jon Meacham looks at how Romney’s identity was shaped by his Mormon roots. To illustrate this formative time in the presidential candidate’s life, we turned to a surprising photo found in the archives that shows the rarely-seen personal side of the candidate.

On a recent cover shoot I asked Romney about the image and found out that around 1968, while serving as a Mormon missionary in France, a young Mitt made several photographs with the help of his LDS friends. He described how the photo was taken,  explaining that it was playfully staged for his high school girlfriend and soon-to-be wife, Ann Davies. Romney revealed that the photo is actually one of a series made during his time abroad.

The pictoral gesture worked. Davies joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints prior to marrying Romney in 1969, only months after Romney returned to the U.S. The pair later attended Brigham Young University before settling in Massachusetts, where they raised five sons together.

Paul Moakley is the Deputy photo editor of TIME. 

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Twenty-three years ago today, Jeff Widener ran out of film during the most important assignment of his life.

The brutal crackdown at Tiananmen Square was underway and Widener, a photographer for the Associated Press, was sent to the square to capture the scene. “I rode a bicycle to the Beijing Hotel,” Widener says. “Upon my arrival, I had to get past several Chinese security police in the lobby. If they stopped and searched me, they would have found all my gear and film hidden in my clothes.” But there, in the shadows of the hotel entrance, he saw a long-haired college kid wearing a dirty Rambo t-shirt, shorts and sandals. “I yelled out, ‘Hi Joe! Where you been?’ and then whispered that I was from AP.” Widener remembers. He asked to go to the young man’s room. “He picked up on it,” says Widener, “and out of the corner of my eye I could see the approaching security men turn away, thinking I was a hotel guest.”

The young man was an American. His name was Kirk Martsen.

Martsen told Widener that he was lucky to arrive when he did. Just a few minutes earlier, some hotel guests had been shot by a passing military truck full of Chinese soldiers. Martsen said hotel staff members had dragged the bodies back in the hotel and that he had barely escaped with his life. From a hotel balcony, Widener was able to take pictures with a long lens—but then he ran out of film. So he sent Martsen on a desperate hunt for more, and Martsen returned with one single roll of Fuji color negative. It was on this film that Widener captured one of the most iconic images in history, the lone protester facing down a row of Chinese tanks.

“After I made the image, I asked Kirk if he could smuggle my film out of the hotel on his bicycle to the AP office at the Diplomatic Compound,” Widener says. “He agreed to do this for me as I had to stay in the hotel and wait for more supplies and could not risk being found out. I watched Kirk from my balcony, which was right over the area where the security was. In what seemed to be an eternity, Kirk unlocked his bike and started to pedal off, although a bit awkwardly because all my film was stashed in his underwear. Five hours later, a call to Mark Avery at the AP office in Beijing confirmed that the film had arrived and been transmitted world-wide. What I did not know until 20 years later was what actually transpired after Kirk pedaled the bicycle away.”

On the 20th anniversary of Tiananmen Square, I wrote an article detailing each story behind the four different versions of the iconic scene on the Lens blog of the New York Times. At the time of publication, Widener wasn’t sure if the young man’s name was Kirk or Kurt. Soon after, Widener says, that changed: “I was on the computer and that familiar ‘You’ve Got Mail’ rang out on AOL. I could not believe who it was from. After 20 years, Kirk had found me because of the article in the New York Times.”

Widener discovered that Martsen encountered gunfire and more soldiers after he left with the precious film and that he became lost trying to navigate back streets to find the Associated Press office. Martsen went to the U.S. embassy and handed over the film to a U.S. Marine at the entrance, and told the embassy to forward the film to the AP office.

“Kirk risked his life,” Widener says. “If not for all of his efforts, my pictures may never have been seen.”

The next day, the image appeared on the front pages of newspapers around the world.

Courtesy Jeff Widener

Jeff Widener and his wife Corinna, whom he met while revisiting Tiananmen 20 years after he made the now-iconic photograph.

Years later, the BBC flew Widener back to China to revisit the Square where he made the iconic photo. While walking down Changan Avenue toward the square, Widener met a German teacher sitting on the sidewalk smoking. Widener introduced himself and they had lunch. They were married in July 2010. “If anyone had told me that I would return from that bullet-riddled street 20 years later to meet my future wife, I would have thought them nuts,” Widener says. “Fate has a strange sense of humor.”

Jeff Widener is an award-winning American photographer. See more of his work here.

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Peter Hapak photographed the contenders for the women’s U.S. Olympic team for this week’s issue of TIME. The gallery above includes additional images of the fighters in action.

Boxing has always been an Olympic sport. The ancient Greeks wrapped their fists in leather strips in the 7th century B.C. In the modern Games, gold medals have launched the sport’s greatest figures: Floyd Patterson, Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, George Foreman and Oscar De La Hoya all made their first appearance on the world stage with a victory in the Olympics.

This summer in London, the XXX Olympiad will present a historic debut. For the first time, female boxers will compete. It’s been 19 years since a teenage girl named Dallas Malloy went to U.S. federal court to win the right for women to participate in amateur boxing. Now Americans are fighting their way toward the first U.S. Olympic women’s boxing team. Just getting to London will be a tough fight. For these boxers, this Olympics is limited, a test run. Only 36 women in the world will be allowed to compete in three weight divisions: flyweight (112-lb. limit), lightweight (132 lb.) and middleweight (165 lb.). Meanwhile, some 250 men will box in 10 weight classes.

Men’s Olympic bouts last for three 3-min. rounds. The women’s bouts are four rounds of 2 min. each. Debate flared when the AIBA, the international organization governing amateur boxing, suggested women might be required to wear short skirts rather than trunks to make it easier to distinguish them from male boxers. After an uproar, the AIBA agreed that skirts will be optional.

The three women who won the U.S. Olympic boxing trials in February near Spokane, Wash.—each winning four bouts in the process—are fighting for a chance to make history.

MORE: The New Olympic Ring

Katherine Dunn  is an award-winning Oregon-based writer and author of Geek Love. She won the Dorothea Lange—Paul Taylor Award in 2004 for her work on School of Hard Knocks: The Struggle for Survival in America’s Toughest Boxing Gyms.

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President Obama delivered his third State of the Union speech last night before a joint session of Congress in Washington, D.C.

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ONLY A TEST
ONLY A TEST: A person dressed in a tiger costume acted the part of a wild animal being shot by a tranquilizer gun during a training session at the Chengdu, China, Zoo Thursday. Zoo employees were being trained on methods for capturing escaped animals. (Zuma Press)

SHEARED OPEN
SHEARED OPEN: A house in Springfield, Mass., stood open to the sky Thursday, one day after at least two late-afternoon tornadoes surprised emergency officials and caused the state’s first tornado-related deaths in 16 years. (Jessica Hill/Associated Press)

RISKY BUSINESS
RISKY BUSINESS: A Russian woman peered through a shop window at vegetables in Moscow Thursday. Russia on Thursday banned all fruit and vegetable imports from the EU, out of concern over an E. coli outbreak that has left 18 dead and sickened hundreds in at least eight European countries. (Maxim Shipenkov/European Pressphoto Agency)

REVVING UP
REVVING UP: A mechanic dismantled a car engine at a workshop in Noida, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, Thursday. Automobile sales in India grew at a record 27% in the financial year ended March 31, to 15.51 million units, but the industry expects the pace this year to be around 12%-15%. (Parivartan Sharma/Reuters)

NOTABLE VISITOR
NOTABLE VISITOR: A three-year-old boy, a patient at an HIV/AIDS hospice in Yangon, Myanmar, held a flower he planned give to visiting U.S. Sen. John McCain Thursday. Sen. McCain was expected to meet pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi during his visit. (Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters)

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POLITICAL SCUFFLE
POLITICAL SCUFFLE: Shiite and Sunni National Assembly members fought during a heated debate Wednesday in Kuwait about Kuwaitis held at Guantanamo Bay. The speaker of parliament suspended sessions after the fight. (Yasser al Zayyat/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

BY THE NECK
BY THE NECK: Vice speaker of Ukrainian Parliament Adam Martynyuk, right, grabbed deputy Oleg Lyashko during a legislative session in Kiev Wednesday. (Tatyana Bondarenko/Reuters)

UNDER WATER
UNDER WATER: A home was nearly submerged in Vicksburg, Miss., Wednesday. (Eric Thayer/Reuters)

X-RAY IMAGE
X-RAY IMAGE: This X-ray, provided by officials in Chiapas, Mexico, shows migrants from Latin America and Asia inside a truck heading to the U.S. Local police said they found more than 500 migrants Tuesday inside two trailer trucks. The red arrows mark distance. (Chiapas state attorney general/Associated Press)

RESCUED
RESCUED: A man grabbed a woman who jumped from a building in Changchun, Jilin Province, China, Tuesday. The 22-year-old had attempted suicide after her boyfriend tried to end their four-year relationship. (ChinaFotoPress/Zuma Press)

FILLING IN
FILLING IN: A Palestinian worker poured cement at the base of an Israeli separation barrier that cuts through the West Bank village of Walajeh, just south of Jerusalem, Wednesday. (Jim Hollander/European Pressphoto Agency)

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