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Original author: 
Cyrus Farivar

On Thursday, the world’s largest Bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, announced that it would require all users to “be verified in order to perform any currency deposits and withdrawals. Bitcoin deposits do not need verification, and at this time we are not requiring verification for Bitcoin withdrawals.”

The company did not provide any explanation about why it was imposing this new requirement, but it did say that it would be able to process most verifications within 48 hours.

The move comes two days after federal prosecutors went after Liberty Reserve, another online currency that had notoriously poor verification. (In court documents, a federal investigator in that case included an address of “123 Fake Main Street, Completely Made Up City, New York” to create an account that was accepted.) It also comes two weeks after the Department of Homeland Security started investigating Mt. Gox over the possible crime of money transmitting without a license.

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Original author: 
Todd Hoff

When you have a large population of servers you have both the opportunity and the incentive to perform interesting studies. Authors from Google and the University of California in Optimizing Google’s Warehouse Scale Computers: The NUMA Experience conducted such a study, taking a look at how jobs run on clusters of machines using a NUMA architecture. Since NUMA is common on server class machines it's a topic of general interest for those looking to maximize machine utilization across clusters.

Some of the results are surprising:

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Original author: 
Jon Brodkin

Niall Kennedy

Todd Kuehnl has been a developer for nearly 20 years and says he's tried "pretty much every language under the sun."

But it was only recently that Kuehnl discovered Go, a programming language unveiled by Google almost four years ago. Go is still a new kid on the block, but for Kuehnl, the conversion was quick. Now he says "Go is definitely by far my favorite programming language to work in." Kuehnl admitted he is "kind of a fanboy."

I'm no expert in programming, but I talked to Kuehnl because I was curious what might draw experienced coders to switch from proven languages to a brand new one (albeit one co-invented by the famous Ken Thompson, creator of Unix and the B programming language). Google itself runs some of its back-end systems on Go, no surprise for a company that designs its own servers and much of the software (right down to the operating systems) that its employees use. But why would non-Google engineers go with Go?

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Original author: 
Aaron Souppouris

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According to the noted psychologist Dr. Barbara Fredrickson, it takes three positive emotions to balance out a single negative. As Fast Company reports, Fredrickson's findings are at the heart of Google's Android design philosophy. When considering any user interface decision, designers working on Android have to work out how to inform users of an issue — such as reaching the final homescreen — without making them feel like they've done something wrong, meaning that means pop-ups and other invasive techniques are a no-go. For the homescreen problem, Google settled on the now-familiar glimmering animation, which subtly shows that a user has no more homescreens to swipe across to, while rewarding them with an artistic flourish.

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Original author: 
Nathan Yau

In distributed denial-of-service attack a bunch of machines make a bunch of requests to a server to make it buckle under the pressure. There was recently an attack on VideoLAN's download infrastructure. Here's what it looked like.

So you see this giant swarm of requests hitting the server. In contrast, here's what normal traffic looks like. Much more tranquil.

[via FastCo]

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Original author: 
(author unknown)



Голландский фотограф Антон Корбайн вот уже на протяжении тридцати пяти лет снимает культового американского музыканта Тома Уэйтса.


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Original author: 
(author unknown)

Three years ago in these pages, ALA technical editor Ethan Marcotte fired the shot heard ’round the web. ALA designer Mike Pick thought it might be fun to celebrate the third anniversary of “Responsive Web Design” (A List Apart Issue No. 306, May 25, 2010) by secreting an Easter Egg in the original article; our illustrator, Kevin Cornell, rose to the challenge.

To see it in action, visit alistapart.com/article/responsive-web-design, grab the edge of the browser window (device permitting), and perform the responsive resize mambo. (ALA’s Tim Murtaugh, who coded the Easter Egg, has provided a handy video demo of what you’ll see.)

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