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Techno is no longer new, no longer radical, no longer industrial, no longer trendy, no longer shocking. But it just might be something else: lasting.

Famed Köln label Kompakt, as sure a bellweather for techno as anything, turns twenty this year. And in celebrating its birthday, humans and machines meet again.

Electronic dance music has long had a conversation with minimalist currents and ostinati in Classical music, with Indonesian gamelan ensembles, and yes, infamously, even with the oom-pah repetition of marching bands. In the video above, we see what happens when the label’s music makes those conversations explicit. And it’s just the beginning of what’s coming.

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CREEP echoes cover art

Dark Brooklyn-based duo CREEP release their debut album Echoes on November 12, ten tracks with with featured artists including Planningtorock and Romy Madley Croft – but they save their secret weapon for the after-dark finish. The seductive "Dim The Lights" enlists Sia, the powerful singer/songwriter who flies relatively under the radar despite her features with Guetta et al, and looms with nighttime longing. "Tectonic plates might shift/ I see it as a gift", Sia intones through swelling strings and thick bass. Here it's not a rumble made for a basement dancefloor, but between the sheets.

Pre-order Echoes here.

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Staff

Although the English summer hasn't really begun (and maybe it never will), we have a Summer Playlist to present from Los Angeles-based DJ Diplo. Coming in at 102 songs long, the prolific producer's playlist should last you a good six or seven hours and provide you with enough material to stop you getting tired of the same tracks. Featured are upbeat songs from Disclosure, Daft Punk, SBTRKT, Miguel, A-Trak, BAAUER, Ryan Hemsworth, Vampire Weekend, and Snoop Lion. Listen to the Endless Summer Playlist below!

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(author unknown)

Photographing the Soul of UK Garage 

Over the last few years, it’s become increasingly clear that we didn’t appreciate UK garage to the extent that we should have. You can’t help but think that most of the DJs, producers, filmmakers, and fashion designers referencing Todd Edwards and Ben Sherman in their work today actually grew up listening to Coal Chamber and wearing JNCO jeans. 

One man who was definitely there, however, is photographer Ewen Spencer. Ewen’s done a lot of things over the years, from working with the White Stripes and documenting the halcyon days of grime (if there was ever such a thing) in his book Open Mic, to taking the liner photos for Original Pirate Material. His latest project concerns the increasingly lauded but still somewhat undocumented world of UKG, and comes in the form of a new book, Brandy & Coke.

The photos are fantastic, perfectly capturing the atmosphere of those early garage nights all my friends’ older brothers claim to have been at. The newspaper-print trousers and YSL button-downs are all there in the forefront, being splashed by open bottles of champagne and classy drinks. After a good few hours of longingly staring at the photos, wishing I was one of the satin-suited people in them, I decided to catch up with Ewen to talk garage, grime, garms and whether or not ex-Newcastle striker Andy Cole really was one of the “original 50 garage ravers.”

You can find some of these images and some words from Ewen in the latest issue of VICE Magazine.

VICE: Hi, Ewen. So, when did you first hear the term garage used in relation to dance music?
Ewen Spencer: In the early 90s, but that would have been American garage, like house music. New York vocal house music would have been called “garage.” I first heard it on the soul scene, probably. At that time, it was crossing over and me and my pals were going to soul parties, avoiding the atrocious rave scene. House music was infiltrating the soul scene and, at that time, garage was basically soulful house.

There’s this debate about who the true parents of UK garage are—what’s your opinion on that?
Yeah, I think it’s a worthwhile debate. It came from America, it didn’t come from rave culture. Rave culture was British. It came from Detroit, America, which is when we started to hear house music in the club—in Newcastle, for instance. We liked all of that stuff, but it was placed side by side with soul music: Soul II Soul, modern soul, SOS Band, all that shit. So I guess rave became overground and house music changed and became something else. And then I’d say speed garage came out of New Jersey and was popularized over here. 

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Jakub

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I know we still have a Boards Of Canada album to hear, I know the new Daft Punk has Panda Bear on it, I also know that I can’t stop listening to this track since we originally posted it.

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zeptarthestarman:

Bassnectar - Smashers & Mashers mix

Track listing
Metallyka – ‘For Whom The Bass Tolls Mashup’ (Bassnectar rmx)
Mr. Oizo – ‘Rage Against The Machine Mashup’ (White)
Another Homicide vs JuJu – (Bassnectar Murder Mashup)
Cut & Run vs Reso (Bassnectar Bongo Masher)
Dj Wonder/Aphrodite/Menta (Dr. Traxxxoverlap Smashup)
Girl Talk – ‘Shake That Azz’ (Bassnectar remix) (White)
Bassnectar – ‘Everybody Ladybug Mecca’ – Dog Star (Acappella)
Bassnectar – ‘Impossible And Overwhelming’ (Om Records)
The Cure’ – ‘Close To Me’ (Rhino
Bassnectar Feat. Sunru Skywaka – ‘Leprechauns Arise’ (Amorphous)

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We’re going to start featuring the most interesting, creative and original animated music videos every weekend in a new section we call the Weekend Groove. Submit you vidoes HERE.

“Gangsta Riddim” directed by about:blank (Belgium)

Audio excerpt of “Gangsta Riddim” remix by Roel Funcken. Gangsta Riddim (Original) by SCANONE.

“Over You” directed by Drushba Pankow (Germany)

“Over You” is a music video clip originally made for the song “Nobody’s Fool” by Parov Stelar. The Berlin-based musician Michal Krajczok wrote and produced his song “Over You” especially for this video, featuring the voice of Larissa Blau. The video is directed, designed and animated by Drushba Pankow (Alexandra Kardinar and Volker Schlecht), with additional animation by Maxim Vassiliev.

“A Very Unusual Map” directed by Loup Blaster (France)

A music video for Hibou Blaster

“Teapot” directed by Clem Stamation (Australia)

Cantaloupe are a synth-guitar/bass-drums trio from Nottingham, UK, formed in January 2011. Drawing influences from Afro-pop to Krautrock to the avant garde, who aim to make infectuous and thoroughly pleasing instrumental pop music.

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Written By Guest Blogger Dana Kelly

To wrap up 2012, I’d say that Poliça’s “Give You The Ghost” is definitely one of the top ranking albums of the year. (...) Read More about Best of 2012: Poliça (183 words)

MUSIC | Permalink | No comment |

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Let’s enhance!

So, it seems a bit like Elektron might be working on a 4-voice analog synth. That is, especially since that’s what’s in the image found on the teaser site.

Wonder what we can learn from the other corners of the image.

I think the most interesting question here is whether Elektron does something clever with the sequencing portion – that is, obviously, another analog 4-voice synth isn’t news, but if it fits the Monomachine mold, it might be.

Thank you to Jakob Penca for tipping us off via Twitter, and to the Elektron Users forum. Sorry, I’m late to this party, as – speaking of choosing between hardware and (Ableton) software, we were deep in the Live 9 launch information in mid-October. Been a surprisingly big month for tech. Synthtopia notes CV I/O are visible in the earlier images, too, so in fact control voltage connectivity is a sure thing, continuing CV’s remarkable comeback.

Uh… but CDM is the first, I believe, to post the Enhance! video. Dear Elektron: want to go on a Lapland ski holiday together so we don’t have to meet at NAMM? (Boring!) We can invite Teenage Engineering and Sonic Charge.

Update: Sources tell DE:BUG that the image is correct, and that the product should arrive later this year. (Don’t know if that will be an announcement or actually shipping.) Article in German.

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野生の野望: YMO-Related Japanese Pop Mix 

Put together by Root Blog, a 17 track compilation of quality 80’s Japanese pop music, all related to members of Yellow Magic Orchestra:

This is a compilation (with separate tracks, i.e. not “mixed”) that I gave to some friends last Christmas season as crash course to Hosono/Sakamoto/Takahashi’s pop productions. Had a few people request that I up it here…so, here you go!

Miharu Koshi – “Parallelisme” from Parallelisme
Testpattern – “Souvenir Glacé” from Apres Midi
Yukihiro Takahashi – “Curtains” from Neuromantic
Chakra – “You Need Me” from Satekoso
Tamao Koike – “Automne Dans Un Miroir” from Automne Dans Un Miroir
Yellow Magic Orchestra – “Gradated Grey” from Technodelic
Sandii – “Zoot Koot” From Eating Pleasure
Susan – “I Only Come Out At Night” from The Girl Can’t Help It
Haruomi Hosono – “Sports Man” from Philharmony
Miharu Koshi – “Scandal Night” from Tutu
Haruomi Hosono – “Strange Love” from S.F.X.
Hajime Tachibana – “Rock (New Version)” from Yen Memorial Album
Masami Tsuchiya – “Rice Music” from Rice Music
Ryuichi Sakamoto – “Thatness and Thereness” from B-2 Unit
David Sylvian & Ryuichi Sakamoto – “Bamboo Music” from Bamboo Houses
Yellow Magic Orchestra – “Wild Ambitions” from Naughty Boys
Taeko Ohnuki – “Inori” from Alfa/Yen: We Wish You a Merry Christmas

It was hard to choose one track as an example (it could have been the slower-paced yet suductive “Zoot Koot”), but chose something more pop, catchy, and fun.

Links to get hold of the compilation can be found at Root Blog here

(via prostheticknowledge:)

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