Skip navigation
Help

Free software

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.
Original author: 
Florence Ion


What if you could privately use an application and manage its permissions to keep ill-intending apps from accessing your data? That’s exactly what Steve Kondik at CyanogenMod—the aftermarket, community-based firmware for Android devices—hopes to bring to the operating system. It’s called Incognito Mode, and it’s designed to help keep your personal data under control.

Kondik, a lead developer with the CyanogenMod team, published a post on his Google Plus profile last week about Incognito Mode. He offered more details on the feature:

I've added a per-application flag which is exposed via a simple API. This flag can be used by content providers to decide if they should return a full or limited dataset. In the implementation I'm working on, I am using the flag to provide these privacy features in the base system:

  • Return empty lists for contacts, calendar, browser history, and messages.
  • GPS will appear to always be disabled to the running application.
  • When an app is running incognito, a quick panel item is displayed in order to turn it off easily.
  • No fine-grained permissions controls as you saw in CM7. It's a single option available under application details.

The API provides a simple isIncognito() call which will tell you if incognito is enabled for the process (or the calling process). Third party applications can honor the feature using this API, or they can choose to display pictures of cats instead of running normally.

Every time you install a new application on Android, the operating system asks you to review the permissions the app requests before it can install. This approach to user data is certainly precarious because users can't deny individual permissions to pick and choose what an application has access to, even if they still want to use that app. Incognito Mode could potentially fix this conundrum, enabling users to restrict their data to certain applications.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Florence Ion

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—Although Google's keynote at the I/O conference this week focused heavily on the APIs and behind-the-scenes development of the Android operating system, it looks like there's a lot more in store. This idea was especially apparent in a panel discussion today involving eleven members of the Android development team. The team sat for a forty-minute question and answer session, and while they dodged most inquiries about forthcoming features for Android, they did offer a bit of insight into what the future of Android might look like, what developers could do to help further the platform, and what they’ve learned from their journey thus far.

The conversation began with a question relating to whether or not the Android team would have done anything differently from the beginning. Senior Android Engineer Dianne Hackborn said the team "should have had more control over applications. A big example is the whole settings provider, where we just let applications go and write to it... it was a simple thing that we shouldn’t have done." Ficus Kirkpatrick, one of the founding members of the Android team and the current lead for the Google Play Store team, added that “you’re never going to get everything right the first time. I don’t really regret any of the mistakes we’ve made. I think getting things out there at the speed we did…was the most important thing.”

The team also briefly touched on fragmentation and how they’re working to combat the issue—it was even referred to as the “F” word. "This is something we think about a lot,” said Dave Burke, engineering director of the Android platform. He explained that many silicon vendors take the open source code, break it apart, and create their own Board Support Packages (BSPs) to make their hardware compatible with the software. To streamline the process, the Android team made the code for the platform more layered, so if a vendor needs to make changes, they have a clean abstraction layer to do so without affecting the entire operating system.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
GoogleDevelopers


Google I/O 2013 - Android Design for UI Developers

Nick Butcher, Roman Nurik Design on Android is no longer a complex mystery of disjointed patterns; the Android design guidelines have paved the way for a des...
From:
GoogleDevelopers
Views:
5414

229
ratings
Time:
40:14
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
GoogleDevelopers


Google Developers Live at I/O 2013 - Inside the Niantic Project

John Hanke, Louis Gray The Niantic Project has debuted two applications that center on location and discovery. The Ingress game has sparked incredible interest from Android users, choosing...
From:
GoogleDevelopers
Views:
232

17
ratings
Time:
06:45
More in
Science & Technology

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Unknown Lamer

sfcrazy writes "In this exclusive interview MySQL founder Michael Widenius talks about the reasons of decline of MySQL, what Oracle is doing wrong and how MariaDB is fast replacing it. There are quite some interesting information in this interview. The take out of this interview is — '...there is no reason at all to use MySQL 5.5 instead of MariaDB 5.5. The same will be true for the next generation.'" Of course, he has an economic interest in getting people to use MariaDB. Hard to argue that Oracle isn't evil though.

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None
Original author: 
Soulskill

Hamburg writes "LyX joined this year's Google Summer of Code (GSoC 2013) as a mentoring organization. The LaTeX based open-source GUI LyX has been accepted to the GSoC for the first time. With LyX one can start using LaTeX without being used to 'program' documents. So it's an important entry point to the (La)TeX world, and a bridge between GUI word processors and LaTeX. This is a great opportunity for its development, now student developers can get financial support for contributing new features: successful contributions will earn a stipend of 5000 USD for the student and 500 USD for the organization, in this case the LyX project, who provides mentors to the students. There are already many project ideas, for example a GUI for editing layouts, a presentation mode, EPUB export, an outliner tool for intuitive writing, retina screen (HiDPI) support, and interactive concurrent editing. Would you like to take part, or do you have further ideas for improvements or features? Send your proposals to the lyx-devel mailing list, or simply comment here, what can be suggested to the LyX mentors."

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None


Google reached out to LG for the first time in making a partnership Android device last fall; is it trying to keep its distance from Samsung?

Google

Google is getting concerned about Samsung’s dominance in the Android handset scene, according to a report Monday from the Wall Street Journal. Google is allegedly meeting with other companies to work together and help them become more competitive against the runaway Samsung. Samsung currently owns Android phone sales in nearly every important metric, including unit shipments and profitability.

The WSJ noted that Google’s senior VP of mobile and digital content, Andy Rubin, stated last fall that Google and Samsung’s union had obviously been fruitful, but the company could become a concern if it gained much more footing in sales. Google’s specific concern, according to the WSJ, is that Samsung “has become so big… that it could flex its muscle to renegotiate their arrangement and eat into Google’s lucrative mobile ad business.”

A renegotiation could also afford Samsung perks like earlier access to new versions of Android. It could give Samsung more weight to throw around in creating partnership devices with Google, such that it doesn't feel the need to compromise and then later one-up itself, as happened with the Galaxy Nexus and then Galaxy S III.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

0
Your rating: None

First time accepted submitter aNonnyMouseCowered writes "One of my favorite freeware Android applications has been pulled from the Google Play app store. While I found a replacement for the app, I've decided to install only apps that won't become obsolete merely because of the developer's whim or lack of interest. With the exception of games, which I don't deem essential for work, I don't want to install potential abandonware even if they cost the pauperly sum of $0.00. My decision has thus far meant installing a relatively crude text editor like BusyBox's version of vi, rather than any one of those full-blown mobile office suites. I've found a short list of open source Android apps at Wikipedia, including the usual suspects, Firefox and the VLC media player. There are also links to two other sites at the end of the article. But even the more comprehensive listings have large gaps in them even when compared 'merely' to the programs available in a typical GNU/Linux repository. So can anyone recommend useful or even just fun Free, Libre and Open Source Software for an Android smartphone or tablet? Free virtual beer to those that can find links for FLOSS programs for editing audiovisual media (Blender for Android?) and documents more sophisticated than HTML."

Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

0
Your rating: None