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Berlin based photographer Thorsten Klapsch was born in darmstadt, completed his photography studies at Lette Verein Berlin in 1992. Besides his personal projects, klapsch works for editorials, companies and advertising campaigns. Thorsten klapsch lives in berlin.
[Previously: Thorsten Klapsch Photography]

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Video Link of a snip from actor Aaron Paul's audition tape for Breaking Bad, probably from 2007? The scene he's performing here ended up being part of the Season One introduction to characters Jesse Pinkman and Walter White (2008).

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World Refugee Day

June 20th is World Refugee Day, established by the United Nations to raise awareness of the 43.7 million refugees and internally displaced people around the world. They are men, women and children forced to flee their homes due to persecution, violence or conflict. You can read more about this campaign and make donations on the the World Refugee Web site created by the UNHCR.

Above are a few images from Reportage photographers who have focused their attention on refugee crises over the years. Clockwise from top:

SOMALILAND - MARCH 4, 2010: Tired Somali refugees sleep in the desert after traveling all night through rain and muddy roads on their trip to Yemen. Every year, thousands of people risk their lives crossing the Gulf of Aden to escape conflict and poverty in Somalia. (Photo by Ed Ou/Reportage by Getty Images)

LAIZA, KACHIN STATE – DECEMBER 20, 2011: Internally displaced refugees wait for food stamps to be handed out in Jeyang Camp in northern Myanmar. After a 17-year ceasefire, and despite promises to the contrary from Myanmar President Thein Sein, the Burmese Army went on an offensive in June 2011. (Photo by Christian Holst/Reportage by Getty Images)

SOUTH SUDAN - 2012: The shoes of Gasim Issa, who walked for 20 days on his journey from Blue Nile State, Sudan, to South Sudan. He is in his 50s. (Photo by Shannon Jensen)

NORTH KIVU, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO - OCTOBER, 2012: A camp of refugees who fled the conflict between the government and M23 rebels. (Photo by Alvaro Ybarra Zavala/Reportage by Getty Images)

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Every year, farmers in Indonesia clear large swaths of forest by setting deliberate slash-and-burn fires, sending clouds of smoke into the atmosphere, choking neighbors, including Malaysia and Singapore. This season has been the harshest in years -- in Singapore yesterday, the Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) rose to the highest level on record, reaching 371, prompting government officials to warn residents to stay indoors, and urging the Indonesian government to take action. Indonesia accused Singapore of acting "like a child", and warned it to stay out of domestic affairs. Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said the haze could persist for weeks or longer, as the two nations prepare for emergency talks to ease the crisis. [18 photos]

A woman wears a mask as the Singapore Central Business District is covered with haze Thursday evening, June 20, 2013. Singapore urged people to remain indoors amid unprecedented levels of air pollution Thursday as a smoky haze wrought by forest fires in neighboring Indonesia worsened dramatically. (AP Photo/Joseph Nair)     

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Aryn Baker

Presidential elections are always a time for hope. Nowhere is that more clear than in Iran, where a fervent desire for change is tempered by fears that the people’s voice might not be heard, or, worse yet, altered through fraud and manipulation. Still, Iranians thronged the election rallies, vibrant and noisy affairs that took place in gymnasiums and sports stadiums across the country. As Election Day loomed, candidates, get-out-the-vote volunteers and Iran’s own Supreme Leader Ali Hosseini Khamenei exhorted citizens to vote, and they did, in record numbers. Polling station hours were extended late into the evening of June 14th, and, unlike the elections of 2009, when the results were announced almost immediately, the count took an agonizing 24 hours.

But on Saturday evening, hope blossomed into joy. Hassan Rouhani, the sole moderate on the ballot, exceeded all expectations to sweep a field made up of five other candidates, winning 51% of the vote and narrowly avoiding a runoff.  Iranians celebrated in the streets with dancing and music, an infectious jubilation that led even the White House to grudgingly admit that despite expectations for fraud, the Iranian people finally had their say.

Newsha Tavakolian is based in Tehran. LightBox previously featured Tavakolian’s portrait series, Look.

Aryn Baker is the Middle East bureau chief for TIME. Follow her on Twitter @arynebaker.

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