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Video game development

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Here’s a new sci-fi short that features some solid world-building. Lunar, by Tyson Wade Johnson, jumps off from modern concerns about an intrusive surveillance state and reliance on drones to create a future America in which a faceless police force holds civilians under its thumb. It’s a place where walking down the street with your face covered is illegal; even wearing a hood is enough to have the robo-cops on your ass.

All that is just setup for a story about a man convicted for basically nothing, after which he’s sent to a lunar prison that turns out to be not quite what the public thinks it is. So add the privatization of prisons and some Judge Dredd-style paranoia to the mix of influences.

Check out the 7-minute short below.

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SEGA AGES PANZER DRAGOON (NEW)

The Saturn had a plethora of original Sega titles such as the epoch defining Panzer Dragoon. This PS2 version includes the original Saturn game along with an updated hi-res version along with some bonus extras of artwork and cut sequences in the Pandoras Box - which as the name suggests requires opening. The stirring orchestral score sounds splendid on the PS2 and gameplay is just a refreshing as the Dragoon swoops through beautifully textured valleys, skirting the ravine edge. Whilst gameplay is on the rails the 360 degree firing range makes it feel unrestricted as you fly against hordes of critters to drop them from the sky. The controls remain faithful with the ability to scan around checking for sneaky assailants. Jaw dropping visuals and a story whose threads gently wrap around you before you realise you are cocooned in it. Saturn veterans will lap this up and hopefully the uninitiated will see whats got everyone in a flap.

A fine review of Sega's inspired flight of fancy...

Publisher: Sega
Game Type: Shoot Em Up

Console: PS2

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Capcom, like essentially all major Japanese game publishers these days, is making a major push into free-to-play titles. Deep Down, the company's big PlayStation 4 release, is a F2P role-playing game, a first for Capcom on consoles. It's a pretty bold experiment for the company, and one that producer Yoshinori Ono is prepared to face some criticism for.

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GameBoy Jam 2 just ended, and 6-hour entry Just Silence from Lucas Molina is short, but thought-provoking.

The game is styled like a silent film. It's not a thing I've seen in a real GameBoy game, but when you consider the monochrome nature of the system's graphics, it seems like such a shame that it hasn't been tried before. You play the judge, whose job is to sentence defendants. The mechanics for doing so are so simple and the game so short that rather than explain further, I urge you to just try the game. Even with the defendants walking a bit too slowly, the game still only takes a few minutes to complete.

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Resogun, the latest colorful shooter from Finnish indie developer Housemarque, is an extravagant, heavily detailed demonstration of the PlayStation 4's graphical horsepower. But look under the hood and you'll find an old shoot-'em-up that isn't shy of aping its inspirations.

If you remember losing quarters to the local arcade, you will recognize Resogun's Defender-like structure. As a spaceship, you protect humans from waves of enemies that encroach from both the left and right side of the screen. Resogun adds a twist: you must first "unlock" the humans by exterminating a special set of enemies before collecting the living cargo and delivering it to one of two goals.

It's just enough complexity to make the Defender homage feel new. In frantic moments, collecting humans off the ground and tossing them into their safety zone felt like delivering a slam dunk — not the first thing I associate with the retro shooter genre, but a welcome addition nonetheless.

The other inspiration is a lesser-known sub-genre called bullet hell, niche shooters in which hundreds, sometimes thousands of projectiles that inflict instant death gradually cover the screen. To survive, the player must memorize the intricate bullet patterns and carefully thread a craft through holes sometimes only a couple pixels wide.

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Join Quince the Cat on a treasure-hunting adventure in Plant Cat: First Blossom, an entry into GameBoy Jam 2. This five level puzzle platformer was created by a five person team over the course of ten days, and features some truly stellar happy chiptunes.

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Building a video game is not unlike crafting an intricate mural, nuanced symphony, or blockbuster movie. Modern day game developers have more powerful technology at their disposal than ever before. That being said, the demand for high-quality media—such as 3D models, original soundtrack, art, and so on—is growing every day.

A truly great video game hides the complicated marriage of logic and art behind the scenes, but developers are well aware that even the slightest hiccup could delay production. Here are # obstacles many game developers face.

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Automation has struck down on game development. Developing a game gets easier every year. Certain jobs aren't necessary anymore, game companies go bankrupt, business plans can not keep up with industry development speeds. In short the game industry requires a high shifting skill. Today I want to talk about a few of these speedy developments. Where is the industry heading? And what do I think are upcomming trends?

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