Skip navigation
Help

the Super Bowl

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /var/www/vhosts/sayforward.com/subdomains/recorder/httpdocs/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

snydeq writes "Stings, penetration pwns, spy games — it's all in a day's work along the thin gray line of IT security, writes Roger A. Grimes, introducing his five true tales of (mostly) white hat hacking. 'Three guys sitting in a room, hacking away, watching porn, and getting paid to do it — life was good,' Grimes writes of a gig probing for vulnerabilities in a set-top box for a large cable company hoping to prevent hackers from posting porn to the Disney Channel feed. Spamming porn spammers, Web beacon stings with the FBI, luring a spy to a honeypot — 'I can't say I'm proud of all the things I did, but the stories speak for themselves.'"

0
Your rating: None

Social Media Insights is a new daily newsletter from Business Insider that collects and delivers the top social media news first thing every morning. You can sign up to receive Social Media Insights here or at the bottom of this post.

Facebook Owns Your Phone (Fast Company)
Over the last couple of years, Facebook has packed its mobile apps with much of the same functionality as operating systems like Google’s Android, Apple’s iOS, or Amazon’s version of Android for Kindle Fire. It has not, however, launched the Facebook phone that once seemed inevitable. That's because your phone already is a Facebook phone.

facebook apps

According to comScore, Facebook already owns 23 percent of time spent in apps on Android and iOS. It also owns Instagram, one of the apps with which mobile users spend the second most amount of time (it's tied with Gmail and YouTube at 3 percent). The more time the company controls on its competitors' phones, the less important it is that it doesn't have its own devices. Read >>

What's In Your Wallet? A Facebook Card? (The Huffington Post)
Facebook announced a major addition to their Gifts product on Jan. 31— Facebook Cards. Facebook Cards, as the name implies, are physical, multi-use gift cards that users can order for friends directly through Facebook. Facebook Cards uses the existing Facebook Gifts infrastructure to allow a user to send a Facebook Card with a credit from a participating retailer. The recipient is prompted to enter their mailing address (more data!) in order to receive the physical card. Facebook sees it as a multi-use, multi-retailer product. This nudges it up close to, but not fully into, the mobile wallet space. For one thing it's still a physical object and for another, Facebook has no immediate plans to allow users to load up dollars or deals, but this could change rapidly. Read >>

Facebook Can Totally Undermine Apple And Google (Wired)
We’re in uncharted territory here since platforms-on-top-of-platform configurations are relatively new. Yet we do have one related industry example that could shed some light on this case. It’s one of Japan’s leading mobile social game developers: GREE. GREE makes up to four times more average revenue per user (ARPU) than Zynga. And Facebook has far more reach than GREE. Given that social applications, and particularly games, are the most popular and highest revenue generators of all mobile applications— a Facebook multi-sided platform similar to GREE would divert a lot of value away from Apple’s and Google’s smartphone platforms. Read >>

Wall Street Rethinks Facebook Earnings (Reuters)
Pivotal Research Group analyst Brian Wieser upgraded Facebook to a "Buy" rating, calling Wall Street's reaction to the results "downright dazed." The stock market incorrectly interpreted Facebook's "mobile revenue figures as a negative when in fact they are part of a story that we can see as qualitatively more favorable," Wieser said. Shares of the company finished regular trading the day after earnings down 0.8 percent at $30.98. The company reported a better-than-expected fourth-quarter profit on Wednesday and said mobile advertising revenue doubled to $306 million, suggesting it was making inroads into handheld devices such as smartphones and tablets. Investors were looking for at least $350 million in mobile advertising revenue, Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster said in a note to clients.  Read >>

Developing A Strategic Social Media Plan For Your Business (Ahain Group)
After you’ve taken time to discover how customers would like you to engage on social media, you now need to develop a social media strategy that will generate meaningful and real returns for the business. The 10 steps in developing strategic social media are:

  1. Align with the business
  2. Discover opportunities
  3. Define goals
  4. Identify KPIs
  5. Assign values to KPIs
  6. Decide on channels
  7. Determine tactics
  8. Select analytics
  9. Roll out strategy
  10. Measure and refine

Quantifying an ROI from social media is only possible after you’ve developed a strategic plan that will make measurement both clear and easy. Read >>

Super Bowl, Commercials, And Social Media (NetBase)
Now that the game is over, here is what NetBase found about Super Bowl commercials during the last 24 hours:

  • Go Daddy (249,273 mentions: 14.67 percent positive)
  • Doritos (137,509 mentions, 90.87 percent pos)
  • Pepsi (47,176 mentions, 69.99 percent pos)
  • Volkswagen (31,052 mentions, 84.08 percent pos)
  • Budweiser (24,658 mentions, 83.37 percent pos)
  • Dodge Ram (19,619 mentions, 77.66 percent pos)
  • Taco Bell (19,783 mentions, 93.20 percent pos)
  • Calvin Klein (16,532 mentions, 75.17 percent pos)
  • NFL (Leon Sandcastle) (12,700 mentions, 91.54 percent pos)
  • Blackberry (10,773 mentions, 55.36 percent pos)

most buzzed about football commercials

The graphic compares 8 of the 15 most buzzed about commercials by mentions, sentiment and passion intensity. The amount of chatter about a brand is indicated by the size of the bubble, while the placement of the bubble shows the sentiment (from top to bottom) and the intensity of passion (from left to right). Read >>

How To Measure Social Media ROI (Jason Fox)
Is it enough to have a Facebook profile, a Twitter account, and a YouTube channel? To be putting original content onto each platform on a consistent basis. To be monitoring for comments and likes that you can connect with and create relationships. Maybe venturing out into less common social media channels like Pinterest or Google+. To be collecting Fans, Friends, Followers, and Likes with a reckless abandon. Possibly promoting an occasional Facebook post to maximize exposure. Is that enough? Perhaps it is to much. The only way to know for sure is to measure social media ROI:

social media solutions

No matter how you are using Social Media there is a way to measure its value.  Whether you interested in a general overview or you want to create a closed loop marketing campaign.  There is a system that will help you to Measure Social Media ROI. Read >>

Twitter Blew Out Facebook In The Super Bowl (Business Insider)
As the Baltimore Ravens were narrowly beating the San Francisco 49ers, Twitter featured in 26 out of 52 nationally aired advertisements, while Facebook only featured in four, and Google+ was not mentioned at all. YouTube and Instagram were mentioned once each, according to the website MarketingLand.com. In last year’s Super Bowl, Twitter and Facebook tied with only eight mentions each out of a total of 59 advertisements. For Twitter, the change from eight mentions to 26 represents a gain of more than 300 percent. For Facebook, it is a 50 percent drop. Read >>

The Social Credit Card? (The Huffington Post)
BarclayCard tapped the power of the crowd (their card members) to collaborate on building a better credit card experience. They launched a community where card member could exchange ideas, vote on product features and earn "credits" for their participation. The result is BarclayCard Ring — the world's first community-designed credit card. Benefits include:

  1. Full transparency — insight into how Barclaycard Ring makes money, including metrics on Ring's financial performance.
  2. Continued influence over the offering — a chance to guide Ring's benefits, rates, rules and penalties through an idea submission and peer evaluation system.
  3. A share of Ring profits — including options to donate profits to community-chosen charities.
  4. A robust social experience — topical forums, ask-and-answer, idea-sharing, polls, blogs, and credits earned for community participation.

If your social strategy doesn't include new ways of thinking about how your social customers fit into your business, it better. 2013 will be a game-changing year for social media. Brands like Barclaycard who are serious about social will make sure of that. Read >>

Social Media Is Changing The Way You Fly (WFAA)
Airlines no longer just make money taking travelers where they want to go. Some carriers now show up where their passengers already are. Southwest has six employees dedicated to social media, often only during regular business hours. The airline created its team by drawing employees from different departments, including customer service, marketing, and communications. This team doesn't just respond to questions, comments, and criticism on Twitter. Southwest employees also rebook flights, track bags, and issue travel vouchers all in 140 characters or less. Airline customer service has always been a thankless job. But its presence on social media continues to evolve as the power of participating for passengers does, too. Read >>

Social Media vs. Email: Which One Is Best For Your Business? (Publicity Mag)
The following infographic shows the peculiarities of social media and email. The stats are a bit dated, but you can get a fair idea about the power of both tools. Read >>

social media vs email

Please follow SAI on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

0
Your rating: None

Sundar Pichai

In advance of the release of Google Drive, I sat down yesterday with Google SVP of Chrome and Apps Sundar Pichai and Google Drive product head Scott Johnston. I asked them to elaborate on how Google Drive emerged from within Google, how the product compares to the competition, and where they see it evolving.

What’s ironic is that Pichai was the guy who helped kill a previous product called Google Drive, or GDrive, as detailed in Steven Levy’s “In the Plex”:

Google was about to launch a project it had been developing for more than a year, a free cloud-based storage service called GDrive. But Sundar had concluded that it was an artifact of the style of computing that Google was about to usher out the door. He went to Bradley Horowitz, the executive in charge of the project, and said, “I don’t think we need GDrive anymore.” Horowitz asked why not. “Files are so 1990,” said Pichai. “I don’t think we need files anymore.”

Pichai is still not a fan of files — in fact, his criticism of Dropbox and others is that they’re all about file management –  but he’s come around on “having data available in context.” Here’s an edited transcript of our chat from yesterday:

Liz Gannes: With Google Drive, you’re straddling distinctions between personal and organizational use, and personal storage versus sharing. As a user of Google Docs, Dropbox and others, I often get confused across that juncture about who can see things. How do you design for that?

Sundar Pichai: We strongly believe in the consumerization of the enterprise, and that’s the pillar of all our Google Apps strategy. At work and at home, we try to bring the same set of products. There’s some work in bridging the shift, but examples like the iPad bridge it pretty well. We have good controls in place — an admin can control when you’re using Drive within a company — but it’s an area we can do a lot more in.

Who can see what’s in my Google Drive folder?

Scott Johnston: This is a big shift, in that, really, the Google Drive folder is yours. Only things go in there that you create or that you move there explicitly. There’s a new “shared with me” view, and then you can move them into your Drive if you want. So it’s really this space that you control.

Do you see people using their Google Drive as their backup for everything?

Pichai: It’s a good question. I’m probably not the best representative use case, but the first time I got my access, I put my family pictures there, for safety and peace of mind. I don’t think that problem is well-solved today, so having a very safe, secure place to store, which is cost-affordable, I think is a good opportunity. We also really want people to have data anytime, anywhere.

So — yes?

Pichai: Yes, it’s a long way of saying yes.

What’s the team that created this project? I know Google Drive had been “killed” internally before, but what about this group?

Scott Johnston

Johnston: I came onboard Google in 2006 when we were acquired at JotSpot, and joined the Docs team. On that team, as we got better and better at collaboration on different file types, we started seeing them more and more in our everyday life; for planning a birthday party or, internally, our designers were constantly sharing mocks. And it was this idea of getting out of the way of the user so they don’t have to think about where their stuff is, and they can just do what they’re trying to do. It was a natural evolution of Docs. This is just more touchpoints to access your data.

Is there continuity with previous Google Drive products?

Pichai: What Scott’s talking about, Google Drive as an evolution of Docs, is one thing. Early on, we had a project called Google Drive that was completely different.

What was different?

Pichai: There was a very traditional file system approach, a long time ago, having nothing to do with Google Docs. It was pre-mobile, pre-tablet, with deep integration into My Documents and Windows, et cetera. So it was very different.

Why is this a good product now?

Pichai: Today, when I look at different solutions out there, those are still in the old metaphor of “here are files that you want, manage them.” This is about you living your life online — planning a wedding, buying a house — and having your data available in that context. I think it’s a big pivot, and that’s what excites me and makes it a good product. It’s in the natural flow.

I wouldn’t underestimate the fact that you can use it not just with Google but with third-party applications over time will be a big differentiator. And third is, deep search is very powerful. There is a lot of deep computer science in there, the fact that you can comment on any file type, that there’s full-text indexing with optical character recognition, all that happens magically with our infrastructure.

Johnston: There’s also being able to offer up to 16 terabytes of storage per user.

It’s kind of unusual for you to ask consumers to pay for Google products, right?

Pichai: Today, people are paying for Gmail and Picasa storage. For power users, it is popular. We’ve kind of made it very hard for you to do, but [Google Drive] is very easy. When you do upgrade here, your Gmail automatically goes up to 25 gigs. Over time, given how much Google Apps are the center of many users’ life, and you want to store safely and securely, I think it’s a good model and it’s a pretty good deal.

I know you’ve been working on Google Drive, in various iterations, for a long time. Why are you releasing it now, especially if some key parts are not done?

Pichai: We wanted all of this to be done — iOS, Gmail, etc. We picked a schedule and, like, 18 things made the train, and two got left out, but they will get added in after. The fact that Gmail got delayed and G+ made it, I wouldn’t have known a month ago.

Is this like the Chrome browser, where you guys promised a Mac version was coming soon, and then it took a couple years?

Pichai: Sorry about that. We dramatically underestimated what it would take to do Chrome on the Mac. IOS is a very different story. It works today. IOS is 98 percent done, and it will be here soon.

No matter what you say or launch, the takeaway is going to be, “Google launches Dropbox competitor.” What do you make of the competitive landscape?

Pichai: I think if we wanted to do it, we would have approached it very differently. We’ve gone to great lengths to built it around an online application experience. We want this to be about creating and collaborating — and your data is there for you. I think others have taken a file/data approach, and saying you have [access to] that everywhere. It’s nuanced, but I think it’s very different.

And for an active Google user, the integration we provide is very valuable. [As for Dropbox,]  I think the work they’ve done is great. This is a secular shift in terms of how people are living in the cloud, and I think it’s good to have innovation in the space.

Are we going to see TV ads for this?

Pichai: Not that I know of.

Johnston: The Super Bowl’s a long time from now.

Pichai: If the Niners make it.

0
Your rating: None

Seven weeks ago, a labor dispute threatened to push the NFL season to the sidelines. Instead, the goliaths of gridiron made a glorious return this past week, from the last-second goalstand by the Super Bowl champs Green Bay Packers to Tom Brady’s second-to-no-other-Patriot’s 517 yards passing. The games also paused to mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11th attacks. Though the season is just one week old, fans across the globe are hoping their teams will play in the grand finale next Feb. 5, held for the first time in Indianapolis. -- Lloyd Young
(34 photos total)
Miami Dolphins Brandon Marshall (19) dives over New England Patriots Devin McCourty after catching a pass during the third quarter of their NFL football game in Miami Sept. 12. Hans Deryk/Reuters)

Add to Facebook
Add to Twitter
Add to digg
Add to StumbleUpon
Add to Reddit
Add to del.icio.us
Email this Article

0
Your rating: None

(Hiroshi Kawahara / Getty Images)

This combo picture taken by Sendai city official Hiroshi Kawahara on March 11 and released through Jiji Press on March 25 shows (top to bottom) muddy tsunami water swallowing vehicles and houses at a bridge and finally coming to rest in Sendai city in Miyagi prefecture. Two weeks after a giant quake struck and sent a massive tsunami crashing into the Pacific coast, the death toll from Japan's worst post-war disaster topped 10,000 and there was scant hope for 17,500 others still missing.

John Makely writes: For the more images of the tragedy in Japan and recovery efforts click here.

0
Your rating: None