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WSJ Staff

In today’s pictures, baseball players remember Jackie Robinson in Boston, North Korea marks an anniversary, a man goes face-to-face with a sculpture in Paris, and more.

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In the same way that many Americans are baffled by our obsession with football (yes football, not soccer!) baseball is something I struggle to get my head around. But that was no barrier to enjoying this advert for Dick’s Sporting Goods, which I’ve never heard of but which I assume is some kind of shop that sells sporting goods, owned by an avuncular figure called Dick. Anyway Anomaly commissioned director Derek Cianfrance and cinematographer Peter Deming have produced a gorgeous spot which was shot in one continuous take and captures some of the tension and drama of America’s national sport. In lesser hands this could easily have ended up feeling a bit gimmicky but thanks to such talented treatment it’s pitch perfect (see what I did there?).

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Advertise here via BSA

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Finding Stillness At 95 MPH : Shawn Green at TEDxOrangeCoast

"Life becomes much more fulfilling when we practice working and playing with complete presence", says Shawn Green on redefining the relevance of our life. Shawn Green's Major League Baseball career spanned fifteen seasons with four teams: the Toronto Blue Jays, the Los Angeles Dodgers, the Arizona Diamondbacks, and the New York Mets. During his baseball career, he won numerous accolades including both the American League Gold Glove Award and the Silver Slugger in '99. He finished in the top ten of voting for league MVP three times and was named the LA Sportsman of the Year for his 2002 season. But, statistics tell only part of the story. His path to success was as grounded in philosophical study as in baseball wisdom. Striving to find stillness within the scene of Major League Baseball, Green learned to approach the sport with a clear mind. This approach transformed him as a player, as a family man, and as a post-career athlete transitioning into other paths. He retired from baseball at 34 to spend time with his wife, Lindsay, and their two daughters. AboutTEDx. TEDx was created in the spirit of TED's mission, "ideas worth spreading." The program is designed to give communities, organizations and individuals the opportunity to stimulate dialogue through TED-like experiences at the local level. At TEDx events, a screening of TEDTalks videos -- or a combination of live presenters and TEDTalks videos -- sparks deep conversation and connections. TEDx events are fully planned <b>...</b>
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On Aug. 20, Will Lucas, a lanky righty from Fairfield, Conn., pitched a no-hitter in the Little League World Series. His performance was the opening highlight—the lead—on ESPN’s SportsCenter the next morning. That’s a lot of pressure to put on a bunch of prepubescent ballplayers, a few with voices higher than an Albert Pujols homer. Are we such a sports-obsessed society that we’ll devour the sporting thrills and heartbreak of children just to hold us over until football season?

But try telling the 11-year-olds from impoverished Lugazi, Uganda, who play in bare feet at home, why they shouldn’t be on television. They’ll just keep smiling and having the time of their lives in Williamsport, Pa., host since 1947 to the series—a 10-day tournament featuring eight teams from across the U.S. and eight international teams from places like Mexico, Curaçao, Japan and Panama.

Plus, the kids give better interviews than the pros. After Lucas hurled his no-no, an ESPN reporter asked a typical postgame question: How did it feel to be on the bottom of a celebratory dog pile? “It’s exciting,” Lucas said. “But then at the end, it really hurts.” Sharp, and funny. Can we call him up to the big leagues?

Sean Gregory is a staff writer at TIME.

Wayne Lawrence is a Brooklyn-based photographer. See more of his work here.

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On Tuesday, Matt Cain of the San Francisco Giants became only the 22nd pitcher in Major League Baseball’s history to throw a perfect game, allowing no opposing player to reach base. Of the 22 perfect games, half have come in the last 24 years. Here are some photos from Matt Cain’s perfect game and the [...]

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During his 38 years of snapping elegant, action-packed baseball pictures, Charles Conlon was the singular figure who captured the early years of modern baseball; from 1904 to 1942, he was the sport’s de facto official photographer. And with the recent release of The Big Show: Charles M. Conlon’s Golden Age Baseball Photographs, some freshly discovered shots are being added to the Conlon canon. The compendium, published by Abrams Books in September, is a fitting follow up to Baseball’s Golden Age, Conlon’s 1993 book of the photographer’s images, which was also being re-released last month.

Conlon wasn’t raised with a camera in his hand. At the turn of the century, he was a newspaper proofreader, toiling for the New York Evening Telegram. That paper’s sports editor, John Foster, was also the assistant editor of the annual Spalding Baseball Guide. This book was not only a promotional publication for the sporting goods company, but, in the words of famed New Yorker baseball writer Roger Angell, “indispensable to any true fan.” As Angell writes in the foreward to Baseball’s Golden Age, “these pocket-size baseball compendiums contained the most up-to-date rules of the game, complete statistics and detailed summaries of the previous season, scheduling for the upcoming season, essays, editorials, and hundreds of photographs.”

Foster knew Conlon had a hobby: photography. So he asked Conlon if he’d put it to use, in his spare time, for the Guide. Over the next four decades, Conlon took some of the most iconic shots in baseball history. An unforgettable close-up of Babe Ruth, a young DiMaggio taking a swing, and Ty Cobb sliding into third base — his teeth-clenched, dirt flying in the air — are among his greatest hits.

It’s memorable images like these that appear in The Big Show, which features a surprising shot of Ruth in a Brooklyn Dodgers uniform – he was a coach for the team in 1938. Elsewhere, the 1917 Philadelphia Athletics are seen taking military instruction—the American League president wanted to show that his teams were taking part in the war effort, and portraits of Hall of Famers DiMaggio, Christy Mathewson, Connie Mack, Phil Rizzuto, Walter Johnson, Tris Speaker and Lou Gehrig are also included in this collection.

While Conlon loved the ballpark, his gig was risky. “Aside from countless narrow escapes, I was seriously injured twice,” he says in the ’93 book. “On one occasion, less than half an hour after I had assisted in caring for a brother photographer who was hit in the head by a batted ball, a vicious line drive down the first base line caught me just above the ankle, and I was unable to walk for a couple of weeks.” A second baseman for the New York Giants, Larry Doyle, had a habit of tossing his bat, which sent the shutterbugs ducking. “[Giants manager John] McGraw saw me get a close shave on day from a Doyle bat,” Conlon said, “and ordered Larry to tie the stick to his wrist with a thong.”

Sean Gregory is a staff writer at TIME. Find him on Twitter at @seanmgregory.

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