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free the network map

Motherboard has released its feature documentary, Free the Network, which takes a look at the work being done by some young activists to supplant the corporate-controlled internet with a new, uncensorable, user-controlled network. The 30-minute piece follows hacker Isaac Wilder and his Free Network Foundation from providing internet access to the Occupy activists in Zuccotti Park, to their aspirations for user-owned fiber backbones; and includes commentary from journalist Melissa Gira Grant and author and media critic Douglas Rushkoff. We found the film really works as a snapshot of the movement, conveying its triumphs and setbacks, and educating viewers about the physical infrastructure underlying the internet — control of which...

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In-app purchases Draw Something

Flurry has released its latest research results comparing the iTunes App Store, the Amazon Appstore, and Google Play, and on its face, it looks like users with open wallets are headed to Apple's and Amazon's offerings over Google. The mobile research and advertising company found that for every $1 spent per user on in-app purchases in the App Store, 89 cents was spent in the Amazon Appstore and just 23 cents in Google Play. To get those numbers the agency looked at "a basket of top-ranked apps that have similar presence" across all three platforms and whose "primary business models are in-app purchase[s]." The selection of apps had a total of 11 million active users per day, and revenue was measured from mid-January to the end of...

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Canon 5D Mark III teardown

Freelance filmmaker James Miller could hardly spend a week with his shiny new Canon 5D Mark III before tearing it apart and removing one of the camera's low-pass filters to try and get all the sharpness he could from its full-frame, 22.3-megapixel sensor. While the teardown photos are sure to terrify you, some of Miller's final results look promising. The comparison shots below (which were taken at two different times of day) clearly show more detail in the roof shingles. Low-pass filters sacrifice a bit of clarity to avoid moiré, but in the couple of samples provided by Miller it doesn't look to be a problem. While we'd hardly recommend anyone take a screwdriver to their 5D Mark III yet, it's worth noting that this isn't an unheard of...

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sam on face dot com

Facial recognition software developer Face.com has updated its API and now claims the ability to determine the age of a face in a photograph. The company has already developed a couple of Facebook apps that tag faces in photos but hopes for wider adoption in other scenarios, with mooted use cases such as apps like Netflix gaining the ability to block content based on the person watching it. The technology will need some refining, though — CEO Gil Hirsch admitted in an interview with VentureBeat that it can only work based on how old you look, and that humans are still better than computers at ascertaining age. Indeed, Face.com's software decided that your writer was probably 19, with a "maximum" age of 23 — since I'm actually 25,...

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Craig Mod's Flipboard for iPhone book cover

Craig Mod is a writer and designer who was one of the team members behind the original Flipboard app for the iPhone. In an essay on his blog, he takes a look at Flipboard for iPhone, a physical book he helped put together that documents the creation of the app. Starting with the first code repository commit message, the book spans almost 10,000 other such code changes, covers hundreds of design iterations, and ends in photos from the team's launch party. The book is a decidedly physical means of cataloguing the process of digital creativity, and if you're interested in the artistic process in any of its forms, Mod's thoughtful essay is most certainly worth exploring.

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Space Shuttle decommissioning

There's little question that NASA's three-decade Space Shuttle program was one of mankind's greatest engineering achievements, and it turns out that properly ending it is a significant engineering challenge in its own right. The Atlantic has some superb pictures posted of the Shuttles' final weeks in Cape Canaveral as they're torn down, stripped of valuable components and toxic chemicals, and shipped out to their final resting places around the country, hopefully inspiring a new generation of space explorers for many decades to come.

If you love NASA as much as we do, be prepared: some of the images may make you a little emotional.

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LG flexible e-paper display stock press 550

Ladies and gentlemen, our dreams of flexible digital newspapers are nearly within reach: LG just announced that it has begun mass production of a 6-inch, 1024 x 768 e-paper screen that can bend by up to 40 degrees. We haven't been able to find a press release, but several Korean publications are reporting that the plastic-based screen is shipping to Chinese manufacturers to build e-readers right away, and devices based on the technology could be available in Europe as soon as early April. LG is boasting that at 0.7mm thick, the entire display is as thin as a protective film for a phone's screen. According to the reports, LG conducted 1.5-meter (about 5 foot) drop tests with the screen and smacked it with a rubber mallet with no ill...

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NASA Logo 640

NASA is auctioning off three sets of patents in an effort to increase the "down-to-Earth" benefits of NASA's research and spread its technology to other industries. Three lots of four patents will be auctioned off, and NASA is offering the winners the chance to discuss the technology with its inventors. The patents themselves cover technology related to software development, robotics, artificial intelligence, industrial process control and wireless sensor networks; NASA says these patents "hold broad value in any field where a need exists to design highly complex, automated and intelligent systems."

This isn't the first time NASA has auctioned off patents; the agency believes it is one of the best way to openly exchange intellectual...

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via www.multivu.com

Epson launched its BT-100 media viewer glasses in Japan back in November, but now the Android-powered translucent visor is now available in the USA. The headset uses micro projectors to create a 960 x 540 qHD display in front of the wearer's eyes, which appears as an 80-inch image 5 meters away, while still allowing them to see the world around them. The dual projectors mean that it's able to display 3D content, too. Built-in earbuds handle audio, with Dolby Mobile Surround technology helping to provide an immersive movie experience.

The headset connects to a controller with a touchpad and the standard Android buttons, along with Wi-Fi connectivity that allows you to browse the web, view media, or even (as Thomas Sohmers demonstrated...

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Google logo sign (Flickr)

What's your Google life look like? How many emails do you send / receive throughout the week? What's the busiest day? Who do you contact the most? From where are you (or rather, from where is your account) signing on, and how often do you use Latitude to check into the office? Google has rolled out Account Activity, a beta service that serves as analytics for your Google account. It works with both regular @gmail.com accounts as well as Google Apps users who have custom domain names. Account Activity provides a general overview of how you use Google services, including search — by volume, by top queries, and even by search type (web vs. image).

Unfortunately, there isn't a lot of drilling down into specifics beyond the top page. Aside...

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