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President Obama may not consider Edward Snowden a patriot, and he's likely not alone in that assessment. But to some, the NSA leaker is nothing short of a hero. Among Snowden's many supporters is a game development studio out of Germany called Binji. After two weeks of working "night and day," the company has produced Eddy's Run — The Prism Prison, a side-scroller browser game it describes as a "deep thank you" and "a bow" to Snowden, You're placed in the shoes of Eddy and tasked with avoiding secret agents, deadly drones, surveillance cameras, and other threats in your quest to evade a pursuing government.

Unsurprisingly, reporters serve as your allies along the way. Talking to them gets you four exploding laptops which serve as the game's weapons, with EMP blasts and other tactical tools also at your disposal as Eddy's Run progresses, And unlike a Temple Run knockoff that surfaced on iOS and Android earlier this week, it's clear Binji actually put some legitimate effort into this title. It won't take home any gameplay awards, but the studio is more concerned about raising player awareness regarding the ongoing government surveillance that prompted Snowden's saga to begin with.

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Publisher Verso writes: It is assumed that every inch of the world has been explored and charted; that there is nowhere new to go. But perhaps it is the everyday places around us--the cities we live in--that need to be rediscovered. What does it feel like to find the city's edge, to explore its forgotten tunnels and scale unfinished skyscrapers high above the metropolis? Explore Everything reclaims the city, recasting it as a place for endless adventure.

Plotting expeditions from London, Paris, Berlin, Detroit, Chicago, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, Bradley L. Garrett has evaded urban security in order to experience the city in ways beyond the boundaries of conventional life. He calls it 'place hacking': the recoding of closed, secret, hidden and forgotten urban space to make them realms of opportunity.

Explore Everything is an account of the author's escapades with the London Consolidation Crew, an urban exploration collective.

The book is also a manifesto, combining philosophy, politics and adventure, on our rights to the city and how to understand the twenty-first century metropolis.

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The intro for yesterday's video interview with Don Marti started out by saying, "Don Marti," says Wikipedia, "is a writer and advocate for free and open source software, writing for LinuxWorld and Linux Today." As we noted, Don has moved on since that description was written. In today's interview he starts by talking about some things venture capitalist Mary Meeker of Kleiner Perkins has said, notably that people only spend 6% of their media-intake time with print, but advertisers spend 23% of their budgets on print ads. To find out why this is, you might want to read a piece Don wrote titled Targeted Advertising Considered Harmful. Or you can just watch today's video -- and if you didn't catch Part One of our video conversation yesterday, you might want to check it out before watching Part 2.

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This is a guest post written by Claude Johnson, a Lead Site Reliability Engineer at salesforce.com.

The following is an architectural overview of salesforce.com’s core platform and applications. Other systems such as Heroku's Dyno architecture or the subsystems of other products such as work.com and do.com are specifically not covered by this material, although database.com is. The idea is to share with the technology community some insight about how salesforce.com does what it does. Any mistakes or omissions are mine.

This is by no means comprehensive but if there is interest, the author would be happy to tackle other areas of how salesforce.com works. Salesforce.com is interested in being more open with the technology communities that we have not previously interacted with. Here’s to the start of “Opening the Kimono” about how we work.

Since 1999, salesforce.com has been singularly focused on building technologies for business that are delivered over the Internet, displacing traditional enterprise software. Our customers pay via monthly subscription to access our services anywhere, anytime through a web browser. We hope this exploration of the core salesforce.com architecture will be the first of many contributions to the community.

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Few times a year I am collaborating with Kunterbunt, a travel agency for mentally and/or physically disabled people.
Situated in southern Germany it offers around 60 trips a year of various kind and destinations while strongly focusing on a respectful and easy approach towards the individual. Based on this philosophy the disabled people are allowed to find themselves in the very rare occasion where usual structures, borders and roles defining their everyday life no longer exist. Whether they are able do it consciously or not, for a while they can experience a freedom and room for self-expression that every person is deeply longing for.
Being on the road and documenting their time is a unique opportunity to gain insight into a world unknown to most of us. It is easy to fill a book with the countless experiences of every trip but what remains so special for me is the real honesty I had been confronted with. So refreshingly different from ‘our’ life the disabled don’t or better mostly don’t wear masks, they simply are themselves. Their inner child can be very inspiring and reminding us of our own one.

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