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Embedded systems are typically so complex, with so many
interrelated components, each of which must be perfect, that practically anyone
can do an very effective job of botching a development project.

 Still, it's instructive to examine some of the
habits of the most defective engineers, some of whom have honed dysfunctional
development to a high art.

 It's important to understand the dynamics of
embedded systems: promise the world, start writing code, and let the project
fall completely apart. There's no penalty for non-performance! As the
deadlines draw near, and then pass by, and then fade away as old forgotten
memories, your employer will have so much vested into you and the project
there's no chance you'll be disciplined, no matter what bizarre work habits
you display.

 In fact, a few carefully placed comments about
greener pastures may result in winning a bonus from your panicked employer!

 So, here are a few ways of maximizing your job
security through proper dysfunctional design and management of your next
embedded project.

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Original author: 
Cyrus Farivar

Aurich Lawson

This is the first in a two-part series exploring Butterfly Labs and its lineup of dedicated Bitcoin-mining hardware. In part one, we look at the company and the experiences customers have had with it. In part two, to be published on June 29, we share our experiences running a Bitcoin miner for a couple weeks. Spoiler alert: we made money.

The more I dig into Bitcoin, the stranger it gets. There’s gray-market online gambling and Russian-operated futures markets—to say nothing of the virtual currency’s wild ride over the last several months. It’s full of characters with names like “artforz” and “Tycho,” supposedly two of the largest Bitcoin holders out there. Of course, like most things Bitcoin, it’s nearly impossible to know for sure.

While reporting on a Bitcoin-based gambling story earlier this year, I interviewed Bryan Micon, who works with a Bitcoin-based poker site called Seals With Clubs. (To continue the lack of information, Micon won’t say who owns the site.) Micon has taken it upon himself to investigate what he believes are Bitcoin-related scams—such as the ill-fated Bitcoin Savings and Trust online bank—and he makes public pronouncements about them.

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ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine's article talks about some of the {unspoken} rules most/all the open-source hardware community seems to follow. Why? Because the core group of people who've been doing what is collectively called 'open source hardware' know each other — they're friends, they overlap and compete in some ways, but they all work towards a common goal: sharing their works to make the world a better place and to stand on each others shoulders and not each others toes : ) There will be some folks who agree strongly with what they've outlined as 'unspoken rules,' others, will completely disagree with many points too. That's great, it's time we start this conversation!"


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