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gesture recognition

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Chaos Computer Club have given Apple one in the eye by undermining their fingerprint biometric security feature within 48 hours of the handset being in the publics hands. This makes the NYPD pavement pounding exhortations of the merits of the 5S security ring a little more hollow. Rest assured that Apple including such a feature is probably the thin wedge of biometrics featuring more in consumer devices. For one Valve, the online gaming colossus, have plans to include biometrics in their forthcoming console Steambox. That's a concerning trend, given the amount of countries already deploying the technology within organs of the state. So what else other biometrics can we expect to see in the gadgets of the near future?

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Augmented reality for mobile devices has grown in popularity in recent years partly because of the proliferation of smart phones and tablet computers equipped with exceptional cameras and partly because of developments in computer vision algorithms that make implementing such technologies on embedded systems possible.

Said augmented reality applications have always been limited to a single user receiving additional information about a physical entity or interacting with a virtual agent. Researchers at MIT’s Media Lab have taken augmented reality to the next level by developing a multi-user collaboration tool that allows users to augment reality and share that we other users essentially turning the real world into a digital canvas for all to share.

The Second Surface project as it is known is described as,

…a novel multi-user Augmented reality system that fosters a real-time interaction for user-generated contents on top of the physical environment. This interaction takes place in the physical surroundings of everyday objects such as trees or houses. The system allows users to place three dimensional drawings, texts, and photos relative to such objects and share this expression with any other person who uses the same software at the same spot.

If you still have difficulty understanding how this works and why I believe when made available to the general masses it will be a game changing technology for augmented reality and mobile devices, check out the following explanatory video.

Now, imagine combining this technology with Google Glass and free-form gesture recognition. How awesome would that be?

[source]

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Last week at Unite, the Unity team gave an overview of considerations developers need to take into account when targeting console platforms like XLBA, Wii, PS3, and when using input devices like the Kinect. In this article I'll break it down for you.

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We can no longer hide our secrets from the machines by writing them in books.
MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab report that they have boosted the effectiveness of a game-playing AI by enabling it to read the manual: “When the researchers augmented a machine-learning system so that it could use a player’s manual to guide the development of a game-playing strategy, its rate of victory jumped from 46 percent to 79 percent.”

What’s most amazing about this is that despite the trial and error nature of this kind of machine learning, the ability to correlate text instructions with events in the game do seem to have a significant impact on the system’s capacity to learn how to play, as the article explains: “The researchers also tested a more-sophisticated machine-learning algorithm that eschewed textual input but used additional techniques to improve its performance. Even that algorithm won only 62 percent of its games.” So, you know, RTFM is sound advice, even if you are a machine.

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