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The Physicist

Physicist: Generally speaking, by the time a gas is hot enough to be seen, it’s a plasma.

The big difference between regular gas and plasma is that in a plasma a fair fraction of the atoms are ionized.  That is, the gas is so hot, and the atoms are slamming around so hard, that some of the electrons are given enough energy to (temporarily) escape their host atoms.  The most important effect of this is that a plasma gains some electrical properties that a non-ionized gas doesn’t have; it becomes conductive and it responds to electrical and magnetic fields.  In fact, this is a great test for whether or not something is a plasma.

For example, our Sun (or any star) is a miasma of incandescent plasma.  One way to see this is to notice that the solar flares that leap from its surface are directed along the Sun’s (generally twisted up and spotty) magnetic fields.

A solar flare as seen in the x-ray spectrum.

A solar flare as seen in the x-ray spectrum.  The material of the flare, being a plasma, is affected and directed by the Sun’s magnetic field.  Normally this brings it back into the surface (which is for the best).

We also see the conductance of plasma in “toys” like a Jacob’s Ladder.  Spark gaps have the weird property that the higher the current, the more ionized the air in the gap, and the lower the resistance (more plasma = more conductive).  There are even scary machines built using this principle.  Basically, in order for a material to be conductive there need to be charges in it that are free to move around.  In metals those charges are shared by atoms; electrons can move from one atom to the next.  But in a plasma the material itself is free charges.  Conductive almost by definition.

Jacob's Ladder; for children of all ages

A Jacob’s Ladder.  The electricity has an easier time flowing through the long thread of highly-conductive plasma than it does flowing through the tiny gap of poorly-conducting air.

As it happens, fire passes all these tests with flying colors.  Fire is a genuine plasma.  Maybe not the best plasma, or the most ionized plasma, but it does alright.

Because the flame has a bunch of free charged particles it is pushed and pulled by

The free charges inside of the flame are pushed and pulled by the electric field between these plates, and as those charged particles move they drag the rest of the flame with them.

Even small and relatively cool fires, like candle flames, respond strongly to electric fields and are even pretty conductive.  There’s a beautiful video here that demonstrates this a lot better than this post does.

The candle picture is from here, and the Jacob’s ladder picture is from here.

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First time accepted submitter GinaSmith888 writes "This is a deep dive in the BP protocol Vint Cerf developed that is the heart of NASA's Delay-Tolerant Networking, better known as DTN. From the article: 'The big difference between BP and IP is that, while IP assumes a more or less smooth pathway for packets going from start to end point, BP allows for disconnections, glitches and other problems you see commonly in deep space, Younes said. Basically, a BP network — the one that will the Interplanetary Internet possible — moves data packets in bursts from node to node, so that it can check when the next node is available or up.'"


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A life of panhandling on the streets of Denver is brutal, boring and soul-crushing. Many of those who do it are long-time substance abusers, caught in a vicious cycle: You wouldn’t stand out there 12 hours a day unless you desperately needed heroin, and then only another dose of heroin would get you through another [...]

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Fifty one years ago this week, a microwave transmission from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California was received at Bell Laboratories in Homdel, New Jersey, after bouncing off a giant silver balloon floating in space. It was Echo calling – our first passive space satellite, capable of relaying a message from one point on Earth to another.

It also provided the astronomical reference points needed to locate the city of Moscow more accurately than ever before, bringing the world one crucial step closer to all out nuclear war.

“If it works, it will be the first time voice has traveled from the Earth, up to a man-made moon, and back to earth again,” intones the narrator in NASA’s documentary about Echo, produced that year (see below). The film begins with the feel of a Twilight Zone episode, and doesn’t veer far. Which makes total sense, given just how sci-fi the satellite was.

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