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Original author: 
Addy Osmani

  

Today we’ll discuss how to improve the paint performance of your websites and Web apps. This is an area that we Web developers have only recently started looking at more closely, and it’s important because it could have an impact on your user engagement and user experience.

Frame Rate Applies To The Web, Too

Frame rate is the rate at which a device produces consecutive images to the screen. A low frames per second (FPS) means that individual frames can be made out by the eye. A high FPS gives users a more responsive feel. You’re probably used to this concept from the world of gaming, but it applies to the Web, too.

Long image decoding, unnecessary image resizing, heavy animation and data processing can all lead to dropped frames, which reduces the frame rate, resulting in janky pages. We’ll explain what exactly we mean by “jank” shortly.

Why Care About Frame Rate?

Smooth, high frame rates drive user engagement and can affect how much users interact with your website or app.

At EdgeConf earlier this year, Facebook confirmed this when it mentioned that in an A/B test, it slowed down scrolling from 60 FPS to 30 FPS, causing engagement to collapse. That said, if you can’t do high frame rates and 60 FPS is out of reach, then you’d at least want something smooth. If you’re doing your own animation, this is one benefit of using requestAnimationFrame: the browser can dynamically adjust to keep the frame rate normal.

In cases where you’re concerned about scrolling, the browser can manage the frame rate for you. But if you introduce a large amount of jank, then it won’t be able to do as good a job. So, try to avoid big hitches, such as long paints, long JavaScript execution times, long anything.

Don’t Guess It, Test It!

Before getting started, we need to step back and look at our approach. We all want our websites and apps to run more quickly. In fact, we’re arguably paid to write code that runs not only correctly, but quickly. As busy developers with deadlines, we find it very easy to rely on snippets of advice that we’ve read or heard. Problems arise when we do that, though, because the internals of browsers change very rapidly, and something that’s slow today could be quick tomorrow.

Another point to remember is that your app or website is unique, and, therefore, the performance issues you face will depend heavily on what you’re building. Optimizing a game is a very different beast to optimizing an app that users will have open for 200+ hours. If it’s a game, then you’ll likely need to focus your attention on the main loop and heavily optimize the chunk of code that is going to run every frame. With a DOM-heavy application, the memory usage might be the biggest performance bottleneck.

Your best option is to learn how to measure your application and understand what the code is doing. That way, when browsers change, you will still be clear about what matters to you and your team and will be able to make informed decisions. So, no matter what, don’t guess it, test it!

We’re going to discuss how to measure frame rate and paint performance shortly, so hold onto your seats!

Note: Some of the tools mentioned in this article require Chrome Canary, with the “Developer Tools experiments” enabled in about:flags. (We — Addy Osmani and Paul Lewis — are engineers on the Developer Relations team at Chrome.)

Case Study: Pinterest

The other day we were on Pinterest, trying to find some ponies to add to our pony board (Addy loves ponies!). So, we went over to the Pinterest feed and started scrolling through, looking for some ponies to add.

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Addy adding some ponies to his Pinterest board, as one does. Larger view.

Jank Affects User Experience

The first thing we noticed as we scrolled was that scrolling on this page doesn’t perform very well — scrolling up and down takes effort, and the experience just feels sluggish. When they come up against this, users get frustrated, which means they’re more likely to leave. Of course, this is the last thing we want them to do!

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Pinterest showing a performance bottleneck when a user scrolls. Larger view.

This break in consistent frame rate is something the Chrome team calls “jank,” and we’re not sure what’s causing it here. You can actually notice some of the frames being drawn as we scroll. But let’s visualize it! We’re going to open up Frames mode and show what slow looks like there in just a moment.

Note: What we’re really looking for is a consistently high FPS, ideally matching the refresh rate of the screen. In many cases, this will be 60 FPS, but it’s not guaranteed, so check the devices you’re targeting.

Now, as JavaScript developers, our first instinct is to suspect a memory leak as being the cause. Perhaps some objects are being held around after a round of garbage collection. The reality, however, is that very often these days JavaScript is not a bottleneck. Our major performance problems come down to slow painting and rendering times. The DOM needs to be turned into pixels on the screen, and a lot of paint work when the user scrolls could result in a lot of slowing down.

Note: HTML5 Rocks specifically discusses some of the causes of slow scrolling. If you think you’re running into this problem, it’s worth a read.

Measuring Paint Performance

Frame Rate

We suspect that something on this page is affecting the frame rate. So, let’s go open up Chrome’s Developer Tools and head to the “Timeline” and “Frames” mode to record a new session. We’ll click the record button and start scrolling the page the way a normal user would. Now, to simulate a few minutes of usage, we’re going to scroll just a little faster.

Screen Shot 2013-05-15 at 17.57.48-500
Using Chrome’s Developer Tools to profile scrolling interactions. Larger view.

Up, down, up, down. What you’ll notice now in the summary view up at the top is a lot of purple and green, corresponding to painting and rendering times. Let’s stop recording for now. As we flip through these various frames, we see some pretty hefty “Recalculate Styles” and a lot of “Layout.”

If you look at the legend to the very right, you’ll see that we’ve actually blown our budget of 60 FPS, and we’re not even hitting 30 FPS either in many cases. It’s just performing quite poorly. Now, each of these bars in the summary view correspond to one frame — i.e. all of the work that Chrome has to do in order to be able to draw an app to the screen.

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Chrome’s Developer Tools showing a long paint time. Larger view.

Frame Budget

If you’re targeting 60 FPS, which is generally the optimal number of frames to target these days, then to match the refresh rate of the devices we commonly use, you’ll have a 16.7-millisecond budget in which to complete everything — JavaScript, layout, image decoding and resizing, painting, compositing — everything.

Note: A constant frame rate is our ideal here. If you can’t hit 60 FPS for whatever reason, then you’re likely better off targeting 30 FPS, rather than allowing a variable frame rate between 30 and 60 FPS. In practice, this can be challenging to code because when the JavaScript finishes executing, all of the layout, paint and compositing work still has to be done, and predicting that ahead of time is very difficult. In any case, whatever your frame rate, ensure that it is consistent and doesn’t fluctuate (which would appear as stuttering).

If you’re aiming for low-end devices, such as mobile phones, then that frame budget of 16 milliseconds is really more like 8 to 10 milliseconds. This could be true on desktop as well, where your frame budget might be lowered as a result of miscellaneous browser processes. If you blow this budget, you will miss frames and see jank on the page. So, you likely have somewhere nearer 8 to 10 milliseconds, but be sure to test the devices you’re supporting to get a realistic idea of your budget.

Screen Shot 2013-03-25 at 14.34.26-500
An extremely costly layout operation of over 500 milliseconds. Larger view.

Note: We’ve also got an article on how to use the Chrome Developer Tools to find and fix rendering performance issues that focuses more on the timeline.

Going back to scrolling, we have a sneaking suspicion that a number of unnecessary repaints are occurring on this page with onscroll.

One common mistake is to stuff just way too much JavaScript into the onscroll handlers of a page — making it difficult to meet the frame budget at all. Aligning the work to the rendering pipeline (for example, by placing it in requestAnimationFrame) gives you a little more headroom, but you still have only those few milliseconds in which to get everything done.

The best thing you can do is just capture values such as scrollTop in your scroll handlers, and then use the most recent value inside a requestAnimationFrame callback.

Paint Rectangles

Let’s go back to Developer Tools → Settings and enable “Show paint rectangles.” This visualizes the areas of the screen that are being painted with a nice red highlight. Now look at what happens as we scroll through Pinterest.

Screen Shot 2013-03-25 at 14.35.17-500
Enabling Chrome Developer Tools’ “Paint Rectangles” feature. Larger view.

Every few milliseconds, we experience a big bright flash of red across the entire screen. There seems to be a paint of the whole screen every time we scroll, which is potentially very expensive. What we want to see is the browser just painting what is new to the page — so, typically just the bottom or top of the page as it gets scrolled into view. The cause of this issue seems to be the little “scroll to top” button in the lower-right corner. As the user scrolls, the fixed header at the top needs to be repainted, but so does the button. The way that Chrome deals with this is to create a union of the two areas that need to be repainted.

Screen Shot 2013-05-15 at 19.00.12-500
Chrome shows freshly painted areas with a red box. Larger view.

In this case, there is a rectangle from the top left to top right, but not very tall, plus a rectangle in the lower-right corner. This leaves us with a rectangle from the top left to bottom right, which is essentially the whole screen! If you inspect the button element in Developer Tools and either hide it (using the H key) or delete it and then scroll again, you will see that only the header area is repainted. The way to solve this particular problem is to move the scroll button to its own layer so that it doesn’t get unioned with the header. This essentially isolates the button so that it can be composited on top of the rest of the page. But we’ll talk about layers and compositing in more detail in a little bit.

The next thing we notice has to do with hovering. When we hover over a pin, Pinterest paints an action bar containing “Repin, comment and like” buttons — let’s call this the action bar. When we hover over a single pin, it paints not just the bar but also the elements underlying it. Painting should happen only on those elements that you expect to change visually.

Screen Shot 2013-03-25 at 14.35.46-500
A cause for concern: full-screen flashes of red indicate a lot of painting. Larger view.

There’s another interesting thing about scrolling here. Let’s keep our cursor hovered over this pin and start scrolling the page again.

Every time we scroll through a new row of images, this action bar gets painted on yet another pin, even though we don’t mean to hover over it. This comes down more to UX than anything else, but scrolling performance in this case might be more important than the hover effect during scrolling. Hovering amplifies jank during scrolling because the browser essentially pauses to go off and paint the effect (the same is true when we roll out of the element!). One option here is to use a setTimeout with a delay to ensure that the bar is painted only when the user really intends to use it, an approach we covered in “Avoiding Unnecessary Paints.” A more aggressive approach would be to measure the mouseenter or the mouse’s trajectory before enabling hover behaviors. While this measure might seem rather extreme, remember that we are trying to avoid unnecessary paints at all costs, especially when the user is scrolling.

Overall Paint Cost

We now have a really great workflow for looking at the overall cost of painting on a page; go back into Developer Tools and “Enable continuous page repainting.” This feature will constantly paint to your screen so that you can find out what elements have costly paint times. You’ll get this really nice black box in the top corner that summarizes paint times, with the minimum and maximum also displayed.

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Chrome’s “Continuous Page Repainting” mode helps you to assess the overall cost of a page. Larger view.

Let’s head back to the “Elements” panel. Here, we can select a node and just use the keyboard to walk the DOM tree. If we suspect that an element has an expensive paint, we can use the H shortcut key (something recently added to Chrome) to toggle visibility on that element. Using the continuous paint box, we can instantly see whether this has a positive effect on our pages’ paint times. We should expect it to in many cases, because if we hide an element, we should expect a corresponding reduction in paint times. But by doing this, we might see one element that is especially expensive, which would bear further scrutiny!

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The “Continuous Page Repainting” chart showing the time taken to paint the page.

For Pinterest’s website, we can do it to the categories bar or to the header, and, as you’d expect, because we don’t have to paint these elements at all, we see a drop in the time it takes to paint to the screen. If we want even more detailed insight, we can go right back to the timeline and record a new session to measure the impact. Isn’t that great? Now, while this workflow should work great for most pages, there might be times when it isn’t as useful. In Pinterest’s case, the pins are actually quite deeply nested in the page, making it hard for us to measure paint times in this workflow.

Luckily, we can still get some good mileage by selecting an element (such as a pin here), going to the “Styles” panel and looking at what CSS styles are being used. We can toggle properties on and off to see how they effect the paint times. This gives us much finer-grained insight into the paint profile of the page.

Here, we see that Pinterest is using box-shadow on these pins. We’ve optimized the performance of box-shadow in Chrome over the past two years, but in combination with other styles and when heavily used, it could cause a bottleneck, so it’s worth looking at.

Pinterest has reduced continuous paint mode times by 40% by moving box-shadow to a separate element that doesn’t have border-radius. The side effect is slightly fuzzy-looking corners; however, it is barely noticeable due to the color scheme and the low border-radius values.

Note: You can read more about this topic in “CSS Paint Times and Page Render Weight.”

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Toggling styles to measure their effect on page-rendering weight. Larger view.

Let’s disable box-shadow to see whether it makes a difference. As you can see, it’s no longer visible on any of the pins. So, let’s go back to the timeline and record a new session in which we scroll the same way as we did before (up and down, up and down, up and down). We’re getting closer to 60 FPS now, and that’s just from one change.

Public service announcement: We’re absolutely not saying don’t use box-shadow — by all means, do! Just make sure that if you have a performance problem, measure correctly to find out what your own bottlenecks are. Always measure! Your website or application is unique, as will any performance bottleneck be. Browser internals change almost daily, so measuring is the smartest way to stay up to date on the changes, and Chrome’s Developer Tools makes this really easy to do.

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Using Chrome Developer Tools to profile is the best way to track browser performance changes. Larger view.

Note: Eberhard Grather recently wrote a detailed post on “Profiling Long Paint Times With DevTools’ Continuous Painting Mode,” which you should spend some quality time with.

Another thing we noticed is that if you click on the “Repin” button, do you see the animated effect and the lightbox being painted? There’s a big red flash of repaint in the background. It’s not clear from the tooling if the paint is the white cover or some other affected being area. Be sure to double check that the paint rectangles correspond to the element or elements that you think are being repainted, and not just what it looks like. In this case, it looks like the whole screen is being repainted, but it could well be just the white cover, which might not be all that expensive. It’s nuanced; the important thing is to understand what you’re seeing and why.

Hardware Compositing (GPU Acceleration)

The last thing we’re going to look at on Pinterest is GPU acceleration. In the past, Web browsers have relied pretty heavily on the CPU to render pages. This involved two things: firstly, painting elements into a bunch of textures, called layers; and secondly, compositing all of those layers together to the final picture seen on screen.

Over the past few years, however, we’ve found that getting the GPU involved in the compositing process can lead to some significant speeding up. The premise is that, while the textures are still painted on the CPU, they can be uploaded to the GPU for compositing. Assuming that all we do on future frames is move elements around (using CSS transitions or animations) or change their opacity, we simply provide these changes to the GPU and it takes care of the rest. We essentially avoid having to give the GPU any new graphics; rather, we just ask it to move existing ones around. This is something that the GPU is exceptionally quick at doing, thus improving performance overall.

There is no guarantee that this hardware compositing will be available and enabled on a given platform, but if it is available the first time you use, say, a 3D transform on an element, then it will be enabled in Chrome. Many developers use the translateZ hack to do just that. The other side effect of using this hack is that the element in question will get its own layer, which may or may not be what you want. It can be very useful to effectively isolate an element so that it doesn’t affect others as and when it gets repainted. It’s worth remembering that the uploading of these textures from system memory to the video memory is not necessarily very quick. The more layers you have, the more textures need to be uploaded and the more layers that will need to be managed, so it’s best not to overdo it.

Note: Tom Wiltzius has written about the layer model in Chrome, which is a relevant read if you are interested in understanding how compositing works behind the scenes. Paul has also written a post about the translateZ hack and how to make sure you’re using it in the right ways.

Another great setting in Developer Tools that can help here is “Show composited layer borders.” This feature will give you insight into those DOM elements that are being manipulated at the GPU level.

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Switching on composited layer borders will indicate Chrome’s rendering layers. Larger view.

If an element is taking advantage of the GPU acceleration, you’ll see an orange border around it with this on. Now as we scroll through, we don’t really see any use of composited layers on this page — not when we click “Scroll to top” or otherwise.

Chrome is getting better at automatically handling layer promotion in the background; but, as mentioned, developers sometimes use the translateZ hack to create a composited layer. Below is Pinterest’s feed with translateZ(0) applied to all pins. It’s not hitting 60 FPS, but it is getting closer to a consistent 30 FPS on desktop, which is actually not bad.

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Using the translateZ(0) hack on all Pinterest pins. Note the orange borders. Larger view.

Remember to test on both desktop and mobile, though; their performance characteristics vary wildly. Use the timeline in both, and watch your paint time chart in Continuous Paint mode to evaluate how fast you’re busting your budget.

Again, don’t use this hack on every element on the page — it might pass muster on desktop, but it won’t on mobile. The reason is that there is increased video memory usage and an increased layer management cost, both of which could have a negative impact on performance. Instead, use hardware compositing only to isolate elements where the paint cost is measurably high.

Note: In the WebKit nightlies, the Web Inspector now also gives you the reasons for layers being composited. To enable this, switch off the “Use WebKit Web Inspector” option and you’ll get the front end with this feature in there. Switch it on using the “Layers” button.

A Find-and-Fix Workflow

Now that we’ve concluded our Pinterest case study, what about the workflow for diagnosing and addressing your own paint problems?

Finding the Problem

  • Make sure you’re in “Incognito” mode. Extensions and apps can skew the figures that are reported when profiling performance.
  • Open the page and the Developer Tools.
  • In the timeline, record and interact with your page.
  • Check for frames that go over budget (i.e. over 60 FPS).
  • If you’re close to budget, then you’re likely way over the budget on mobile.
  • Check the cause of the jank. Long paint? CSS layout? JavaScript?

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Spend some quality time with Frame mode in Chrome Developer Tools to understand your website’s runtime profile. Larger view.

Fixing the Problem

  • Go to “Settings” and enable “Continuous Page Repainting.”
  • In the “Elements” panel, hide anything non-essential using the hide (H) shortcut.
  • Walk through the DOM tree, hiding elements and checking the FPS in the timeline.
  • See which element(s) are causing long paints.
  • Uncheck styles that could affect paint time, and track the FPS.
  • Continue until you’ve located the elements and styles responsible for the slow-down.

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Switch on extra Developer Tools features for more insight. Larger view.

What About Other Browsers?

Although at the time of writing, Chrome has the best tools to profile paint performance, we strongly recommend testing and measuring your pages in other browsers to get a feel for what your own users might experience (where feasible). Performance can vary massively between them, and a performance smell in one browser might not be present in another.

As we said earlier, don’t guess it, test it! Measure for yourself, understand the abstractions, know your browser’s internals. In time, we hope that the cross- browser tooling for this area improves so that developers can get an accurate picture of rendering performance, regardless of the browser being used.

Conclusion

Performance is important. Not all machines are created equal, and the fast machines that developers work on might not have the performance problems encountered on the devices of real users. Frame rate in particular can have a big impact on engagement and, consequently, on a project’s success. Luckily, a lot of great tools out there can help with that.

Be sure to measure paint performance on both desktop and mobile. If all goes well, your users will end up with snappier, more silky-smooth experiences, regardless of the device they’re using.

Further Reading

About the Authors

Addy Osmani and Paul Lewis are engineers on the Developer Relations team at Chrome, with a focus on tooling and rendering performance, respectively. When they’re not causing trouble, they have a passion for helping developers build snappy, fluid experiences on the Web.

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© Addy Osmani for Smashing Magazine, 2013.

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Your rating: None
Original author: 
Stéphanie Walter

  

Responsive Web design has been around for some years now, and it was a hot topic in 2012. Many well-known people such as Brad Frost and Luke Wroblewski have a lot of experience with it and have helped us make huge improvements in the field. But there’s still a whole lot to do.

In this article, we will look at what is currently possible, what will be possible in the future using what are not yet standardized properties (such as CSS Level 4 and HTML5 APIS), and what still needs to be improved. This article is not exhaustive, and we won’t go deep into each technique, but you’ll have enough links and knowledge to explore further by yourself.

The State Of Images In Responsive Web Design

What better aspect of responsive Web design to start off with than images? This has been a major topic for a little while now. It got more and more important with the arrival of all of the high-density screens. By high density, I mean screens with a pixel ratio higher than 2; Apple calls these Retina devices, and Google calls them XHDPI. In responsive Web design, images come with two big related challenges: size and performance.

Most designers like pixel perfection, but “normal”-sized images on high-density devices look pixelated and blurry. Simply serving double-sized images to high-density devices might be tempting, right? But that would create a performance problem. Double-sized images would take more time to load. Users of high-density devices might not have the bandwidth necessary to download those images. Also, depending on which country the user lives in, bandwidth can be pretty costly.

The second problem affects smaller devices: why should a mobile device have to download a 750-pixel image when it only needs a 300-pixel one? And do we have a way to crop images so that small-device users can focus on what is important in them?

Two Markup Solutions: The <picture> Element and The srcset Attribute

A first step in solving the challenge of responsive images is to change the markup of embedded images on an HTML page.

The Responsive Images Community Group supports a proposal for a new, more flexible element, the <picture> element. The concept is to use the now well-known media queries to serve different images to different devices. Thus, smaller devices would get smaller images. It works a bit like the markup for video, but with different images being referred to in the source element.

The code in the proposed specification looks like this :


<picture width="500"  height="500">     
  <source  media="(min-width: 45em)" src="large.jpg">
  <source  media="(min-width: 18em)" src="med.jpg">
  <source  src="small.jpg">
  <img  src="small.jpg" alt="">
  <p>Accessible  text</p>
</picture>

If providing different sources is possible, then we could also imagine providing different crops of an image to focus on what’s important for smaller devices. The W3C’s “Art Direction” use case shows a nice example of what could be done.

Picture element used for artistic direction
(Image: Egor Pasko)

The solution is currently being discussed by the W3C Responsive Images Community Group but is not usable in any browser at the moment as far as we know. A polyfill named Picturefill is available, which does pretty much the same thing. It uses a div and data-attribute syntax for safety’s sake.

A second proposal for responsive images markup was made to the W3C by Apple and is called “The srcset Attribute”; its CSS Level 4 equivalent is image-set(). The purpose of this attribute is to force user agents to select an appropriate resource from a set, rather than fetch the entire set. The HTML syntax for this proposal is based on the <img> tag itself, and the example in the specification looks like this:


<img  alt="The Breakfast Combo" 
  src="banner.jpeg"
  srcset="banner-HD.jpeg  2x, banner-phone.jpeg 100w, banner-phone-HD.jpeg 100w 2x">

As you can see, the syntax is not intuitive at all. The values of the tag consist of comma-separated strings. The values of the attribute are the names or URLs of the various images, the pixel density of the device and the maximum viewport size each is intended for.

In plain English, this is what the snippet above says:

  • The default image is banner.jpeg.
  • Devices that have a pixel ratio higher than 2 should use banner-HD.jpeg.
  • Devices with a maximum viewport size of 100w should use banner-phone.jpeg.
  • Devices with a maximum viewport size of 100w and a pixel ratio higher than 2 should use banner-phone-HD.jpeg.

The first source is the default image if the srcset attribute is not supported. The 2x suffix for banner-HD.jpeg means that this particular image should be used for devices with a pixel ratio higher than 2. The 100w for banner-phone.jpeg represents the minimum viewport size that this image should be used for. Due to its technical complexity, this syntax has not yet been implemented in any browser.

The syntax of the image-set() CSS property works pretty much the same way and enables you to load a particular background image based on the screen’s resolution:


background-image: image-set(  "foo.png" 1x,
  "foo-2x.png"  2x,
  "foo-print.png"  600dpi );

This proposal is still a W3C Editor’s Draft. For now, it works in Safari 6+ and Chrome 21+.

Image Format, Compression, SVG: Changing How We Work With Images on the Web

As you can see, these attempts to find a new markup format for images are still highly experimental. This raises the issue of image formats themselves. Can we devise a responsive solution by changing the way we handle the images themselves?

The first step would be to look at alternative image formats that have a better compression rate. Google, for example, has developed a new image format named WebP, which is 26% smaller than PNG and 25 to 34% smaller than JPEG. The format is supported in Google Chrome, Opera, Yandex, Android and Safari and can be activated in Internet Explorer using the Google Chrome Frame plugin. The main problem with this format is that Firefox does not plan to implement it. Knowing this, widespread use is unlikely for now.

Another idea that is gaining popularity is progressive JPEG images. Progressive JPEG images are, as the name suggests, progressively rendered. The first rendering is blurry, and then the image gets progressively sharper as it renders. Non-progressive JPEG images are rendered from top to bottom. In her article “Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice,” Ann Robson argues that progressive JPEGs give the impression of greater speed than baseline JPEGs. A progressive JPEG gives the user a quick general impression of the image before it has fully loaded. This does not solve the technical problems of performance and image size, though, but it does improve the user experience.

Another solution to the problems of performance and image size is to change the compression rate of images. For a long time, we thought that enlarging the compression rate of an image would damage the overall quality of the image. But Daan Jobsis has done extensive research on the subject and has written an article about it, “Retina Revolution.” In his experiments, he tried different image sizes and compression rates and came up with a pretty interesting solution. If you keep the image dimensions twice the displayed ones but also use a higher compression rate, then the image will have a smaller file size than the original, but will still be sharp on both normal and high-density screens. With this technique, Jobsis cut the weight of the image by 75%.

Image compression example
Daan Jobsis’ demonstration of image compression.

Given the headaches of responsive images, the idea of gaining pixel independence from images wherever possible is seducing more and more designers and developers. The SVG format, for example, can be used to create all of the UI elements of a website and will be resolution-independent. The elements will scale well for small devices and won’t be pixellated on high-density devices. Font icons are another growing trend. They involve asigning icon glyphs to certains characters of the font (like the Unicode Private Area ones), giving you the flexibility of fonts. Unfortunately, the solution doesn’t work with pictures, so a viable markup or image format is eagerly expected.

Responsive Layout Challenge: Rearrange And Work With Content Without Touching the HTML?

Let’s face it, the fluid grids made of floats and inline blocks that we use today are a poor patch waiting for a better solution. Working with layout and completely rearranging blocks on the page for mobile without resorting to JavaScript is a nightmare right now. It’s also pretty inflexible. This is particularly significant on websites created with a CMS; the designer can’t change the HTML of every page and every version of the website. So, how can this be improved?

Four CSS3 Layout Solutions That Address the Flexible Layout Problem

The most obvious possible solution is the CSS3 flexible box layout model (or “flexbox”). Its current status is candidate recommendation, and it is supported in most major mobile browsers and desktop browsers (in IE starting from version 10). The model enables you to easily reorder elements on the screen, independent of the HTML. You can also change the box orientation and box flow and distribute space and align according to the context. Below is an example of a layout that could be rearranged for mobile. The syntax would look like this:


.parent {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: column; /* display items in columns */
}

.children {
  order: 1; /* change order of elements */
}

Flexbox as an example

The article “CSS3 Flexible Box Layout Explained” will give you a deeper understanding of how flexbox works.

Another solution quite close to the flexbox concept of reordering blocks on the page, but with JavaScript, is Relocate.

A second type of layout that is quite usable for responsive design today is the CSS3 multiple-column layout. The module is at the stage of candidate recommendation, and it works pretty well in most browsers, expect for IE 9 and below. The main benefit of this model is that content can flow from one column to another, providing a huge gain in flexibility. In terms of responsiveness, the number of columns can be changed according to the viewport’s size.

Setting the size of the columns and letting the browser calculate the number of columns according to the available space is possible. Also possible is setting the number of columns, with the gaps and rules between them, and letting the browser calculate the width of each column.

CSS3 Multiple Column layout

The syntax looks like this:


.container {
  column-width: 10em ; /* Browser will create 10em columns. Number of columns would depend on available space. */
}

.container {
  columns: 5; /* Browser will create 5 columns. Column size depends on available space. */
  column-gap: 2em;
}

To learn more, read David Walsh’s article “CSS Columns.”

A third CSS3 property that could gain more attention in future is the CSS3 grid layout. This gives designers and developers a flexible grid they can work with to create different layouts. It allows content elements to be displayed in columns and rows without a defined structure. First, you would declare a grid on the container, and then place all child elements in this virtual grid. You could then define a different grid for small devices or change the position of elements in the grid. This allows for enormous flexibility when used with media queries, changes in orientation and so on.

The syntax looks like this (from the 2 April 2013 working draft):


 .parent {
   display: grid; /* declare a grid */
   grid-definition-columns: 1stgridsize  2ndgridsize …;
   grid-definition-rows: 1strowsize  2ndrowsize …;
}

.element {
   grid-column: 1; 
   grid-row: 1
}

.element2 {
   grid-column: 1; 
   grid-row: 3;
}

To set the sizes of columns and rows, you can use various units, as detailed in the specification. To position the various elements, the specification says this: “Each part of the game is positioned between grid lines by referencing the starting grid line and then specifying, if more than one, the number of rows or columns spanned to determine the ending grid line, which establishes bounds for the part.”

The main problem with this property is that it is currently supported only in IE 10. To learn more about this layout, read Rachel Andrew’s “Giving Content Priority With CSS3 Grid Layout.” Also, note that the specification and syntax for grid layouts changed on 2 April 2013. Rachel wrote an update on the syntax, titled “CSS Grid Layout: What Has Changed?

The last layout that might become useful in future if implemented in browsers is the CSS3 template layout. This CSS3 module works by associating an element with a layout “name” and then ordering the elements on an invisible grid. The grid may be fixed or flexible and can be changed according to the viewport’s size.

The syntax looks like this:


.parent {
   display: "ab"
            "cd" /* creating the invisible  grid */
}

.child1 {
   position: a;
}

.child2 {
   position: b;
}

.child3 {
   position: c;
}

.child4 {
   position: d;
} 

This renders as follows:

CSS3 template layout

Unfortunately, browser support for this CSS3 module is currently null. Maybe someday, if designers and developers show enough interest in this specification, some browser vendors might implement it. For the moment, you can test it out with a polyfill.

Viewport-Relative Units and the End of Pixel-Based Layout

Viewport-based percentage lengths — vw, vh, vm, vmin and vmax — are units measured relative to the dimensions of the viewport itself.

One vw unit is equal to 1% of the width of the initial containing block. If the viewport’s width is 320, then 1 vw is 1 × 320/100 = 3.2 pixels.

The vh unit works the same way but is relative to the height of the viewport. So, 50 vh would equal 50% of the height of the document. At this point, you might wonder what the difference is with the percentage unit. While percentage units are relative to the size of the parent element, the vh and vw units will always be relative to the size of the viewport, regardless of the size of their parents.

This gets pretty interesting when you want to, for example, create a content box and make sure that it never extends below the viewport’s height so that the user doesn’t have to scroll to find it. This also enables us to create true 100%-height boxes without having to hack all of the elements’ parents.

The vmin unit is equal to the smaller of vm or vh, and vmax is equal to the larger of vm or vh; so, those units respond perfectly to changes in device orientation, too. Unfortunately, for the moment, those units are not supported in Android’s browser, so you might have to wait a bit before using them in a layout.

A Word on Adaptive Typography

The layout of a website will depend heavily on the content. I cannot conclude a section about the possibilities of responsive layout without addressing typography. CSS3 introduces a font unit that can be pretty handy for responsive typography: the rem unit. While fonts measured in em units have a length relative to their parent, font measured in rem units are relative to the font size of the root element. For a responsive website, you could write some CSS like the following and then change all font sizes simply by changing the font size specified for the html element:


html {
   font-size: 14px;
}

p {
   font-size: 1rem /* this has 14px */
}

@media screen and (max-width:380px) {
   html {
      font-size: 12px; /* make the font smaller for mobile devices */
   }

   p {
      font-size: 1rem /* this now equals 12px */
   }
}

Except for IE 8 and Opera mini, support for rem is pretty good. To learn more about rem units, read Matthew Lettini’s article “In Defense of Rem Units.”

A Better Way To Work Responsively With Other Complex Content

We are slowly getting better at dealing with images and text in responsive layouts, but we still need to find solutions for other, more complex types of content.

Dealing With Forms on a Responsive Website

Generally speaking, dealing with forms, especially long ones, in responsive Web design is quite a challenge! The longer the form, the more complicated it is to adapt to small devices. The physical adaptation is not that hard; most designers will simply put the form’s elements into a single column and stretch the inputs to the full width of the screen. But making forms visually appealing isn’t enough; we have to make them easy to use on mobile, too.

For starters, Luke Wroblewski advises to avoid textual input and instead to rely on checkboxes, radio buttons and select drop-down menus wherever possible. This way, the user has to enter as little information as possible. Another tip is not to make the user press the “Send” button before getting feedback about the content of their submission. On-the-fly error-checking is especially important on mobile, where most forms are longer than the height of the screen. If the user has mistyped in a field and has to send the form to realize it, then chances are they won’t even see where they mistyped.

In the future, the new HTML5 form inputs and attributes will be a great help to us in building better forms, without the need for (much) JavaScript. For instance, you could use the required attribute to give feedback about a particular field on the fly. Unfortunately, support for this on mobile devices is poor right now. The autocomplete attribute could also help to make forms more responsive.

A mobile phone is a personal possession, so we can assume that data such as name and postal address will remain consistent. Using the autocomplete HTML5 attribute, we could prefill such fields so that the user doesn’t have to type all of that information over and over. There is also a whole list of new HTML5 inputs that can be used in the near future to make forms more responsive.

Dates in form elements are a good example of what can be improved with HTML5. We used to rely on JavaScripts to create date-pickers. Those pickers are quite usable on big desktop screens but very hard to use on touch devices. Selecting the right date with a finger is difficult when the touch zones are so small.

Different picker examples
How am I supposed to select a date when my finger is touching three dates at the same time?

A promising solution lies in the new HTML5 input type="date", which sets a string in the format of a date. The HTML5 input type="datetime" sets a string in the format of a date and time. The big advantage of this method is that we let the browser decide which UI to use. This way, the UI is automatically optimized for mobile phones. Here is what an input type="date" looks like on the desktop, on an Android phone and tablet (with the Chrome browser), and on the iPhone and iPad.

Mobile input type=date rendering
Renderings of input type="date" on different mobile devices.

Note that the screenshots were taken in my browser and on the Android phone, so the language automatically adapted to the system language (French). By using native components, you no longer have to adapt the language into different versions of the website.

For now, support for input type="date" on the desktop is absent except in Opera and Chrome. Native Android browsers don’t support it at all, but Chrome for Android does, and so does Safari on iOS. A lot still has to get done in order for us to be able to use this solution on responsive websites. Meanwhile, you could use a polyfill such as Mobiscroll for mobile browsers that don’t support it natively.

Apart from these HTML5 input solutions, attempts have been made to improve other design patterns, such as passwords on mobile and complex input formatting using masks. As you will notice, these are experimental. The perfect responsive form does not exist at the moment; a lot still has to be done in this field.

Dealing With Tables on a Responsive Website

Another content type that gets pretty messy on mobile and responsive websites is tables. Most table are oriented horizontally and present a lot of data at once, so you can see how getting it right on a small screen is pretty hard. HTML tables are fairly flexible — you can use percentages to change the width of the columns — but then the content can quickly become unreadable.

No one has yet found the perfect way to present tables, but some suggestions have been made.

One approach is to hide what could be considered “less important” columns, and provide checkboxes for the user to choose which columns to see. On the desktop, all columns would be shown, while on mobile, the number of columns shown would depend on the screen’s size. The Filament Group explains this approach and demonstrates it in one of its articles. The solution is also used in the table column toggle on jQuery Mobile.

Responsive table examples
Some examples of responsive tables.

A second approach plays with the idea of a scrollable table. You would “pin” a single fixed-size column on the left and then leave a scroll bar on a smaller part of the table to the right. David Bushell implements this idea in an article, using CSS to display all of the content in the <thead> on the left side of the table, leaving the user to scroll through the content on the right. Zurb uses the same idea but in a different way for its plugin. In this case, the headers stay at the top of the table, and the table is duplicated with JavaScript so that only the first column is shown on the left, and all other columns are shown on the right with a scroll bar.

Responsive table overflow example
Two examples of scrollable responsive tables

The big issue with scroll bars and CSS properties such as overflow: auto is that many mobile devices and tablets simply won’t display a visible scroll bar. The right area of the table will be scrollable, but the user will have no visual clue that that’s possible. We have to find some way to indicate that more content lies to the right.

A third approach is to reflow a large table and split up the columns into what essentially looks like list items with headings. This technique is used in the “reflow mode” on jQuery Mobile and was explained by Chris Coyier in his article “Responsive Data Tables.”

Responsive table reflow example
Reflowing a table responsively

Many other techniques exist. Which to use depends heavily on your project. No two projects are the same, so I can only show you how other people have dealt with it. If you come up with a nice solution of your own, please share it with the world in the comments below, on Twitter or elsewhere. We are in this boat together, and tables suck on mobile, really, so let’s improve them together!

Embedding Third-Party Content: The Responsive Iframe Problem

Many websites consist of embedded third-party content: YouTube or Vimeo videos, SlideShare presentations, Facebook applications, Twitter feeds, Google Maps and so on. A lot of those third parties make you use iframes to embed their content. But let’s face it: iframes are a pain to deal with in responsive design. The big problem is that iframes force a fixed width and height directly in your HTML code. Forcing a 100% width on the iframe would work, but then you would lose the ratio of the embedded content. To embed a video or slideshow and preserve the original ratio, you would have to find a workaround.

An HTML and CSS Workaround

Thierry Koblentz has written a good article titled “Creating Intrinsic Ratios for Video,” in which he proposes a way to embed responsive videos using a 16:9 ratio. This solution can be extended to other sorts of iframe content, such as SlideShare presentations and Google Maps. Koblentz wraps the iframe in a container with a class that we can target in CSS. The container makes it possible for the iframe to resize fluidly, even if the iframe has fixed pixel values in the HTML. The code, adapted by Anders M. Andersen, looks like this:


 .embed-container  {
   position: relative;
   padding-bottom: 56.25%; /* 16:9 ratio */
   padding-top: 30px; /* IE 6 workaround*/
   height: 0;
   overflow: hidden;
}

.embed-container iframe,
.embed-container object,
.embed-container embed {
   position: absolute;
   top: 0;
   left: 0;
   width: 100%;
   height: 100%;
}

This will work for all iframes. The only potential problem is that you will have to wrap all of the iframes on your website in a <div class="embed-container"> element. While this would work for developers who have total control over their code or for clients who are reasonably comfortable with HTML, it wouldn’t work for clients who have no technical skill. You could, of course, use some JavaScript to detect iframe elements and automatically embed them in the class. But as you can see, it’s still a major workaround and not a perfect solution.

Dealing With Responsive Video In Future

HTML5 opens a world of possibilities for video — particularly with the video element. The great news is that support for this element is amazingly good for mobile devices! Except for Opera Mini, most major browsers support it. The video element is also pretty flexible. Presenting a responsive video is as simple as this:


video {
   max-width: 100%;
   height: auto;
}

You’re probably asking, “What’s the problem, then?”

The problem is that, even though YouTube or Vimeo may support the video element, you still have to embed videos using the ugly iframe method. And that, my friend, sucks. Until YouTube and Vimeo provide a way to embed videos on websites using the HTML5 video tag, we have to find workarounds to make video embedding work on responsive websites. Chris Coyier created such a workaround as a jQuery plugin called FitVids.js. It uses the first technique mentioned above: creating a wrapper around the iframe to preserve the ratio.

Embedding Google Maps

If you embed a Google Map on your website, the technique described above with the container and CSS will work. But, again, it’s a dirty little hack. Moreover, the map will resize in proportion and might get so tiny that the map loses the focus area that you wanted to show to the user. The Google Maps’ page for mobile says that you can use the static maps API for mobile embedding. Using a static map would indeed make the iframe problems go away. Brad Frost wrote a nice article about, and created a demo of, adaptive maps, which uses this same technique. A JavaScript detects the screen’s size, and then the iframe is replaced by the static map for mobile phones. As you can tell, we again have to resort to a trick to deal with the iframe problem, in the absence of a “native” solution (i.e. from Google).

We Need Better APIs

And now the big question: Is there a better way? The biggest problem with using iframes to embed third-party content responsively is the lack of control over the generated code. Developers and designers are severely dependent on the third party and, by extension, its generated HTML. The number of websites that provide content to other websites is growing quickly. We’ll need much better solutions than iframes to embed this content.

Let’s face it: embedding Facebook’s iframe is a real pain. The lack of control over the CSS can make our work look very sloppy and can even sometimes ruin the design. The Web is a very open place, so perhaps now would be a good time to start thinking about more open APIs! In the future, we will need APIs that are better and simpler to use, so that anyone can embed content flexibly, without relying on unresponsive fixed iframes. Until all of those very big third parties decide to create those APIs, we are stuck with sloppy iframes and will have to resort to tricks to make them workable.

Responsive Navigation: An Overview Of Current Solutions

Another big challenge is what to do with navigation. The more complex and deep the architecture of the website, the more inventive we have to be.

An early attempt to deal with this in a simple way was to convert the navigation into a dropdown menu for small screens. Unfortunately, this was not ideal. First, this solution gets terribly complicated with multiple-level navigation. It can also cause some problems with accessibility. I recommend “Stop Misusing Select Menus” to learn about all of the problems such a technique can create.

Some people, including Brad Frost and Luke Wroblewski, have attempted to solving this problem. Brad Frost compiled some of his techniques on the website This Is Responsive, under the navigation section.

Toggle navigation involves hiding the menu for small devices, displaying only a “menu” link. When the user clicks on it, all of the other links appear as block-level elements below it, pushing the main content below the navigation.

A variant of this, inspired by some native application patterns, is off-canvas navigation. The navigation is hidden beneath a “menu” link or icon. When the user clicks the link, the navigation slides out as a panel from the left or right, pushing the main content over.

Toggle navigation example
Some examples of toggle navigation

The problem with these techniques is that the navigation remains at the top of the screen. In his article “Responsive Navigation: Optimizing for Touch Across Devices,” Luke Wroblewski illustrates which zones are easily accessible for different device types. The top left is the hardest to get to on a mobile device.

Easy touch access for mobile and tablet
Easily accessible screen areas on mobile phones and tablets, according to Luke Wroblewski.

Based on this, Jason Weaver created some demos with navigation at the bottom. One solution is a footer anchor, with navigation put at the bottom of the page for small devices, and a “menu” link that sends users there. It uses the HTML anchor link system.

Many other attempts have been made to solve the navigation problem in responsive Web design. As you can see, there is not yet a perfect solution; it really depends on the project and the depth of the navigation. Fortunately for us, some of the people who have tried to crack this nut have shared their experiences with the community.

Another unsolved issue is what icon to use to tell the user, “Hey! There’s a menu hidden under me. Click me!” Some websites have a plus symbol (+), some have a grid of squares, other have what looks like an unordered list, and some have three lines (aka the burger icon).

Some responsive icons example
To see these icons used on real websites, have a look at “We Need a Standard ‘Show Navigation’ Icon for Responsive Web Design.”

The main problem is figuring out which of these icons would be the most recognizable to the average user. If we all agreed to use one of them, users would be trained to recognize it. The problem is which to choose? I really would like to know which icon you use, so don’t hesitate to share it in the comments below.

Mobile Specificities: “Is The User On A Mobile Device? If So, What Can It Do?”

Mobile and tablet devices are a whole new world, far removed from desktop computers, with their own rules, behaviors and capabilities. We might want to adapt our designs to this new range of capabilities.

Detecting Touch Capabilities With Native JavaScript

Apart from screen size, I bet if you asked what is the main difference between desktop and mobile (including tablets), most people would say touch capability. There is no mouse on a mobile phone (no kidding!), and except for some rare hybrid devices into which you can plug a mouse, you can’t do much with mouse events on a tablet. This means that, depending on the browser, the :hover CSS pseudo-class might not work. Some browsers are clever enough to provide a native fallback for the hover event by translating it into a touch event. Unfortunately, not all browsers are so flexible. Creating a design that doesn’t depend on hidden elements being revealed on :hover events would be wise.

Catching touch events could also be another solution. A W3C working group has started working on a touch event specification. In the future, we will be able to catch events such as touchstart, touchmove and toucheend. We will be able to deal with these events directly in JavaScript without requiring a third-party framework such as Hammer.js or jGestures. But JavaScript is one thing — what about CSS?

CSS Level 4 “Pointer” Media Query

CSS Level 4 specifies a new media query called “pointer”, which can be used to query the presence and accuracy of a pointing device, such as a mouse. The media query takes one of three values:

  • none
    The device does not have any pointing device at all.
  • coarse
    The device has a pointing device with limited accuracy; for example, a mobile phone or tablet with touch capabilities, where the “pointer” would be a finger.
  • fine
    The device has an accurate pointing device, such as a mouse, trackpad or stylus.

Using this media query, we can enlarge buttons and links for touch devices:


@media  (pointer:coarse) {
   input[type="submit"],
       a.button {
       min-width: 30px;
       min-height: 40px;
       background: transparent;
   }
 }

The pointer media query is not yet supported and is merely being proposed. Nevertheless, the potential is huge because it would enable us to detect touch devices via CSS, without the need for a third-party library, such as Modernizr.

CSS Level 4 “Hover” Media Query

The CSS Level 4 specification proposes a new hover media query, which detects whether a device’s primary pointing system can hover. It returns a Boolean: 1 if the device supports hover, 0 if not. Note that it has nothing to do with the :hover pseudo-class.

Using the hover media query, we can enhance an interface to hide certain features for devices that do support hovering. The code would look something like this:


 @media  (hover) {
   .hovercontent { display: none; } /* Hide content only for devices with hover capabilities. */

   .hovercontent:hover { display: block; }    
 }

It can also be used to create dropdown menus on hover; and the fallback for mobile devices is in native CSS, without the need for a feature-detection framework.

CSS Level 4 Luminosity Media Query

Another capability of mobile devices is the luminosity sensor. The CSS Level 4 specification has a media query for luminosity, which gives us access to a device’s light sensors directly in the CSS. Here is how the specification describes it:

“The “luminosity” media feature is used to query about the ambient luminosity in which the device is used, to allow the author to adjust style of the document in response.”

In the future, we will be able to create websites that respond to ambient luminosity. This will greatly improve user experiences. We will be able to detect, for example, exceptionally bright environments using the washed value, adapting the website’s contrast accordingly. The dim value is used for dim environments, such as at nighttime. The normal value is used when the luminosity level does not need any adjustment.

The code would look something like this:


 @media  (luminosity: washed) {
   p { background: white; color: black; font-size: 2em; }
 }

As you can see, CSS Level 4 promises a lot of fun new stuff. If you are curious to see what’s in store, not only mobile-related, then have a look at “Sneak Peek Into the Future: Selectors, Level 4.”

More Mobile Capabilities to Detect Using APIs and JavaScript

Many other things could be detected to make the user experience amazing on a responsive website. For example, we could gain access to the native gyroscope, compass and accelerometer to detect the device’s orientation using the HTML5 DeviceOrientationEvent. Support for DeviceOrientationEvent in Android and iOS browsers is getting better, but the specification is still a draft. Nevertheless, the API look promising. Imagine playing full HTML5 games directly in the browser.

Another API that would be particularly useful for some mobile users is geolocation. The good news is that it’s already well supported. This API enables us to geolocate the user using GPS and to infer their location from network signals such as IP address, RFID, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth MAC addresses. This can be used on some responsive websites to provide users with contextual information. A big restaurant chain could enhance its mobile experience by showing the user the locations of restaurants in their area. The possibilities are endless.

The W3C also proposed a draft for a vibration API. With it, the browser can provide tactile feedback to the user in the form of vibration. This, however, is creeping into the more specific field of Web applications and mobile games in the browser.

Another API that has been highly discussed is the network information API. The possibility of measuring a user’s bandwidth and optimizing accordingly has seduced many developers. We would be able to serve high-quality images to users with high bandwidth and low-quality images to users with low bandwidth. With the bandwidth attribute of the network API, it would be possible to estimate the downloading bandwidth of a user in megabytes per second. The second attribute, metered, is a Boolean that tells us whether the user has a metered connection (such as from a prepaid card). These two attributes are currently accessible only via JavaScript.

Unfortunately, measuring a user’s connection is technically difficult, and a connection could change abruptly. A user could go into a tunnel and lose their connection, or their speed could suddenly drop. So, a magical media query that measures bandwidth looks hypothetical at the moment. Yoav Weiss has written a good article about the problems that such a media query would create and about bandwidth measurement, “Bandwidth Media Queries? We Don’t Need ’Em!

Many other APIs deal with mobile capabilities. If you are interested in learning more, Mozilla has a very detailed list. Most are not yet fully available or standardized, and most are intended more for Web applications than for responsive websites. Nevertheless, it’s a great overview of how large and complex mobile websites could get in future.

Rethinking The Way We And The User Deal With Content

From a technical perspective, there are still a lot of challenges in dealing with content at a global scale. The mobile-first method has been part of the development and design process for a little while now. We could, for example, serve to mobile devices the minimum data that is necessary, and then use JavaScript and AJAX to conditionally load more content and images for desktops and tablets. But to do this, we would also have to rethink how we deal with content and be able to prioritize in order to generate content that is flexible enough and adaptive. A good example of this is the responsive map solution described above: we load an image for mobile, and enhance the experience with a real map for desktops. The more responsive the website, the more complex dealing with content gets. Flexible code can help us to format adaptive content.

One way suggested by some people in the industry is to create responsive sentences by marking up sentences with a lot of spans that have classes, and then displaying certain ones according to screen size. Trimming parts of sentences for small devices is possible with media queries. You can see this technique in action on 37signals’ Signal vs. Noise blog and in Frankie Roberto’s article “Responsive Text.” Even if such technique could be used to enhance small parts of a website, such as the footer slogan, applying it to all of the text on a website is hard to imagine.

This raises an issue in responsive Web design that will become more and more important in future: the importance of meta data and the semantic structure of content. As mentioned, the content on our websites does not only come from in-house writers. If we want to be able to automatically reuse content from other websites, then it has to be well structured and prepared for it. New HTML5 tags such as article and section are a good start to gaining some semantic meaning. The point is to think about and structure content so that a single item (say, a blog post) can be reused and displayed on different devices in different formats.

The big challenge will be to make meta data easily understandable to all of the people who are part of the content creation chain of the website. We’ll have to explain to them how the meta data can be used to prioritize content and be used to programmatically assemble content, while being platform-independent. A huge challenge will be to help them start thinking in terms of reusable blocks, rather than a big chunk of text that they copy and paste from Microsoft Word to their WYSIWYG content management system. We will have to help them understand that content and structure are two separate and independent things, just as when designers had to understand that content (HTML) and presentation (CSS) are best kept separate.

We can’t afford to write content that is oriented towards one only platform anymore. Who knows on which devices our content will be published in six months, or one year? We need to prepare our websites for the unexpected. But to do so, we need better publishing tools, too. Karen McGrane gave a talk on “Adapting Ourselves to Adaptive Content,” with some real example from the publishing industry. She speaks about the process of creating reusable content and introduces the idea of COPE: create once and publish everywhere. We need to build better CMSes, ones that can use and generate meta data to prioritize content. We need to explain to people how the system works and to think in terms of modular reusable content objects, instead of WYSIWYG pages. As McGrane says:

“You might be writing three different versions of that headline; you might be writing two different short summaries and you are attaching a couple of different images to it, different cut sizes, and then you may not be the person who is in charge of deciding what image or what headline gets displayed on that particular platform. That decision will be made by the metadata. It will be made by the business rules. […] Metadata is the new art direction.”

Truncating content for small devices is not a future-proof content strategy. We need CMSes that provide the structure needed to create such reusable content. We need better publishing workflows in CMSes, too. Clunky interfaces scare users, and most people who create content are not particularly comfortable with complicated tools. We will have to provide them with tools that are easy to understand and that help them publish clean, semantic content that is independent of presentation.

Conclusion

As long as this article is, it only scratches the surface. By now, most of Smashing Magazine’s readers understand that responsive Web design is much more than about throwing a bunch of media queries on the page, choosing the right breakpoints and doubling the size of images for those cool new high-density phones. As you can see, the path is long, and we are not there yet. There are still many unsolved issues, and the perfect responsive solution does not exist yet.

Some technical solutions might be discovered in future using some of the new technologies presented here and with the help of the W3C, the WHATWG and organizations such as the Filament Group.

More importantly, we Web designers and developers can help to find even better solutions. People such as Luke Wroblewski and Brad Frost and all of the amazing women and men mentioned in this article are experimenting with a lot of different techniques and solutions. Whether any succeeds or fails, the most important thing is to share what we — as designers, developers, content strategists and members of the Web design community — are doing to try to solve some of the challenges of responsive Web design. After all, we are all in the same boat, trying to make the Web a better place, aren’t we?

(al) (ea)

© Stéphanie Walter for Smashing Magazine, 2013.

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Casey Johnston


Why are there so many password restrictions to navigate? Characters want to be free.

Daremoshiranai

The password creation process on different websites can be a bit like visiting foreign countries with unfamiliar social customs. This one requires eight characters; that one lets you have up to 64. This one allows letters and numbers only; that one allows hyphens. This one allows underscores; that one allows @#$&%, but not ^*()[]!—and heaven forbid you try to put a period in there. Sometimes passwords must have a number and at least one capital letter, but no, don’t start the password with the number—what do you think this is, Lord of the Flies?

You can’t get very far on any site today without making a password-protected account for it. Using the same password for everything is bad practice, so new emphasis has emerged on passwords that are easy to remember. Sentences or phrases of even very simple words have surfaced as a practical approach to this problem. As Thomas Baekdal wrote back in 2007, a password that’s just a series of words can be “both highly secure and user-friendly.” But this scheme, as well as other password design tropes like using symbols for complexity, does not pass muster at many sites that specify an upper limit for password length.

Most sites seem to have their own particular password bugaboos, but it’s rarely, if ever, clear why we can’t create passwords as long or short or as varied or simple as we want. (Well, the argument against short and simple is concrete, but the others are not immediately clear). Regardless of the password generation scheme, there can be a problem with it: a multi-word passphrase is too long and has no symbols; a gibberish password is too short, and what’s the % doing in there?

Read 12 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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By Dominique Hazaël-Massieux: People used to stare at me and laugh, back in 2005 when W3C launched its Mobile Web Initiative to advocate the importance of the web to the mobile world. Now I am the one smiling much of the time, as I did most recently during the 2013 edition of the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, one of the largest events to focus on mobile devices and networks.

This year W3C had a huge HTML5 logo splashed across its booth to emphasize the impact of the Open Web Platform across industries and devices. But the real adoption story was told by the HTML5 logos prominent at many, many other booths. The web has gained real visibility on mobile, and we should all be smiling because we are all getting closer to a platform for reaching more people on more devices at lower cost.

MWC 2013 also confirmed that HTML5 has broken out of the browser. We are seeing more and more HTML5-based development platforms, such as PhoneGap, Windows 8, Blackberry, and Tizen. Mozilla’s big announcement at MWC 2013 centered on FirefoxOS, Mozilla’s mobile operating system entirely based on web technologies. W3C and Intel partnered to create a T-shirt that says “I See HTML5 Everywhere.” And indeed, I do.

The challenge of mobile

Not only has the web a big role to play on mobile, mobile has also a key role to play for the web. As more and more of our connected interactions start or end on mobile devices, we must ensure that the web platform adapts to our mobile lives. I believe this is critical for the future of the web.

For many years W3C has designed technology to make the experience of web users on mobile ever more rich, adapted, and integrated. For example, CSS media queries provide the basis for responsive web design. There is already a lot for mobile, and a lot more is coming. To help people follow all the activity, every quarter I publish an overview of web technologies that are most relevant to mobile.

These technologies are the tools designers can rely on to build the user experience they need. But technologies are only a small piece of the puzzle when it comes to making the web user experience work on mobile devices. The number of A List Apart articles about mobile development provides a clear sign that this challenge is driving creativity in the design community. Responsive web design, mobile first, future friendly, and just-in-time interactions are some of the trends that have resonated with me over the years. The creativity is fantastic, but we still want our lives to be easier. Where web technologies do not yet provide the hooks you need to practice your craft, please let us know. Feel free to write me directly: dom@w3.org.

Closing the gap

Another challenge that we, the web community, face on mobile is the amazing energy devoted to native development.

The web has displaced a lot of the native software development on traditional computers; on mobile, the reverse trend has happened. Content that users had enjoyed on the web for years started to migrate to native applications: newspapers, social networking, media sharing, government services, to name a few. And to add insult to injury, a number of these content providers are pushing their users away from their website toward their native application, with obtrusive banners or pop-ups.

It is unclear where the world is going on mobile: some statistics and reports show a strong push toward moving back to the web (e.g., the recent Kendo UI survey), while others argue the opposite. What is clear to me, though, is that we cannot afford to let mobile become a native-entrenched ecosystem.

What has made the web unique and popular in so many hearts is not the technology (some great, some terrible) nor even the ubiquity (since interoperability can reduce it). I believe the much more fundamental importance of the web comes from its structural openness: anyone can publish the content they see fit and anyone can participate in defining the future of the web as a platform.

Native ecosystems on mobile have historically been very closed ecosystems, under the control of single commercial entities. A world where the majority of our information and infrastructure would be trapped inside these ecosystems is not something we should accept lightly. Mind you, I appreciate the innovations spawned by these platforms, but we need to encourage the cycle where innovations become standards, and those standards prime the platform for the next innovations.

Of course the best way to shift the balance to the web is to make the web the best platform for mobile. Achieving this will require ideas and energy from many people, and web developers and designers play a critical role in shaping the next generation of web user experiences. I am leading a focused effort in W3C to assess what we can and should do to make the web more competitive on mobile, and welcome feedback and ideas on what the missing pieces in the puzzle are.

Beyond mobile

I believe a key part in making the web the “king of mobile” is to realize that mobile devices are a means to an end. In our connected world—computers, phones, tablets, TVs, cars, glasses, watches, refrigerators, lightbulbs, sensors and more to come—mobile phones will most likely remain the hub for while. The only platform that can realistically be made available on all these devices is the web.

We have a unique opportunity to make the Open Web Platform a success. I realize getting it right will not be trivial. Building user experiences that scale from mobile (or watches!) to TV is complex. Building user experiences that adapt to these very different type of interactions will be hard. Matching the needs from users in a growing diversity of contexts will make us cringe. Creating user experiences that abolish the devices barrier (as I explored some months ago) is guaranteed to create more than a few headaches.

But there is unprecedented momentum to create an open platform for the planet. And that has me smiling a lot.

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After disasters (or to minimize expensive data use generally, and take advantage of available Wi-Fi), bypassing the cell network is useful. But it's not something that handset makers bake into their phones. colinneagle writes with information on a project that tries to sidestep a dependence on the cellular carriers, if there is Wi-Fi near enough for at least some users: "The Smart Phone Ad-Hoc Networks (SPAN) project reconfigures the onboard Wi-Fi chip of a smartphone to act as a Wi-Fi router with other nearby similarly configured smartphones, creating an ad-hoc mesh network. These smartphones can then communicate with one another without an operational carrier network. SPAN intercepts all communications at the Global Handset Proxy so applications such as VoIP, Twitter, email etc., work normally."

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Hindus worldwide recently celebrated Diwali, a five-day "festival of lights" that marks the new year and honors the principle of good over evil. One Diwali ritual is honoring Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of wealth and prosperity. The occasion is also celebrated with fireworks, the sharing of sweets and gifts, and by decorating homes with lights and candles. Diwali is an official holiday in India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad & Tobago, Suriname, Malaysia, Singapore, and Fiji.-- Lloyd Young EDITOR'S NOTE: Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, there will be no post on Friday.)( 42 photos total)
A reveler lights a bottle rocket at a park during Diwali, the “festival of lights”, in Kolkata on Nov. 13. The festival marks the victory of good over evil and commemorates the time when Hindu God Lord Rama achieved victory over Ravana and returned to his kingdom Ayodhya after 14 years in exile. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

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Today marks the start of the five-day festival of Diwali, celebrated by Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, and Sikhs around the world. During Diwali, originally a harvest festival, lamps are lit to celebrate the triumph of good over evil, fireworks are set off to drive away evil spirits, and prayers for prosperity are offered to Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. Collected here are images of this year's festival, as celebrants color their world, give prayers, and wish each other a happy Diwali. [33 photos]

A girl lights earthen lamps in a formation to form the shape of Hindu god Ganesh, the deity of prosperity, on the eve of Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights, in the northern Indian city of Chandigarh, on November 12, 2012. (Reuters/Ajay Verma)

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