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Original author: 
Sean Gallagher


The ArxCis-NV DIMM combines DDR3 dynamic memory with a flash memory backup.

Viking Technology

The server world still waits for DDR4, the next generation of dynamic memory, to be ready for prime time. In the meantime, a new set of memory boards from Viking is looking to squeeze more performance out of servers not by providing faster memory, but by making it safer to keep more in memory and less on disk or SSD. Viking Technology has begun supplying dual in-line memory modules that combine DDR3 dynamic memory with NAND flash memory to create non-volatile RAM for servers and storage arrays—modules that don't lose their memory when the systems they're in lose power or shut down.

The ArxCis-NV DIMM, which Viking demonstrated at the Storage Networking Industry Association's SNW Spring conference in Orlando this week, plugs into standard DIMM memory slots in servers and RAID controller cards.  Viking isn't the only player in the non-volatile DIMM game—Micron Technology and AgigA Tech announced their own NVDIMM effort in November—but they're first to market. The modules shipping now to a select group of server manufacturers have 4GB of dynamic RAM and 8GB of NAND memory. Modules with double those figures are planned for later in the year, and modules with 16GB of DRAM and 32GB of NAND are in the works for next year.

The ArxCis can be plugged into existing servers and RAID controllers today as a substitute for battery backed-up (BBU) memory modules. They are even equipped with batteries to power a last-gasp write to NAND memory in the event of a power outage. But the ArxCis is more than a better backup in the event of system failure. Viking's non-volatile DIMMs are primarily aimed at big in-memory computing tasks, such as high-speed in-memory transactional database systems and indices such as those used in search engines and other "hyper-scale" computing applications.  Facebook's "Unicorn" search engine system, for example, keeps massive indices in memory to allow for real-time response to user queries, as does the "type-ahead" feature in Google's search.

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New submitter jyujin writes "Ever wonder how long your SSD will last? It's funny how bad people are at estimating just how long '100,000 writes' are going to take when spread over a device that spans several thousand of those blocks over several gigabytes of memory. It obviously gets far worse with newer flash memory that is able to withstand a whopping million writes per cell. So yeah, let's crunch some numbers and fix that misconception. Spoiler: even at the maximum SATA 3.0 link speeds, you'd still find yourself waiting several months or even years for that SSD to start dying on you."

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Zothecula writes "DARPA has seen the future of naval warfare and it's falling upward. As part of an effort to reduce the logistics of sending equipment into trouble areas, the agency's Upward Falling Payloads project is aimed at developing storage capsules capable of remaining on the deep seabed for years. These would contain non-lethal military assets that could be deployed on the spot years in advance and rise to the surface as needed." Possible side benefit: they need to research communications systems reliable enough to command the deep sea capsules when needed.

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MrSeb writes "Today is World Backup Day! The premise is that you back up your computers on March 31, so that you're not an April Fool if your hard drive crashes tomorrow. How do Slashdot users back up? RAID? Multiple RAIDs? If you're in LA, on a fault line, do you keep a redundant copy of your data in another geographic region?"


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New submitter multimediavt writes "Ok, here's my problem. I have a lot of personal data! (And, no, it's not pr0n, warez, or anything the MPAA or RIAA would be concerned about.) I am realizing that I need to keep at least one spare drive the same size as my largest drive around in case of failure, or the need to reformat a drive due to corrupt file system issues. In my particular case I have a few external drives ranging in size from 200 GB to 2 TB (none with any more than 15 available), and the 2 TB drive is giving me fits at the moment so I need to move the data off and reformat the drive to see if it's just a file system issue or a component issue. I don't have 1.6 TB of free space anywhere and came to the above realization that an empty spare drive the size of my largest drive was needed. If I had a RAID I would have the same needs should a drive fail for some reason and the file system needed rebuilding. I am hitting a wall, and I am guessing that I am not the only one reaching this conclusion. This is my personal data and it is starting to become unbelievably unruly to deal with as far as data integrity and security are concerned. This problem is only going to get worse, and I'm sorry 'The Cloud' is not an acceptable nor practical solution. Tape for an individual as a backup mechanism is economically not feasible. Blu-ray Disc only holds 50 GB at best case and takes forever to backup any large amount of data, along with a great deal of human intervention in the process. So, as an individual with a large data collection and not a large budget, what do you see as options for now (other than keeping a spare blank drive around), and what do you see down the road that might help us deal with issues like this?"


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MrSeb writes "Megaupload's shutdown poses an interesting question: What happens to all the files that were stored on the servers? XDA-Developers, for example, has more than 200,000 links to Megaupload — and this morning, they're all broken, with very little hope of them returning. What happens if a similar service, like Dropbox, gets shut down — either through bankruptcy, or federal take-down? Will you be given a chance to download your files, or helped to migrate them to another similar service? What about data stored on enterprise services like Azure or AWS — are they more safe?"
And if you're interested, the full indictment against Megaupload is now available.



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RIO RAID
RIO RAID: Authorities patrolled Rio de Janeiro’s Rocinha slum Monday. About 3,000 police officers and soldiers raided the crime-ridden slum a day earlier. Officials hope to have the area under control in time for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. (Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)

OPEN WIDE
OPEN WIDE: A child received a polio vaccination at a health center in San’a, Yemen, Monday. (Yahya Arhab/European Pressphoto Agency)

MAYDAY
MAYDAY: Responders worked to extinguish flames on the Sergei Abramov ship at a pier in Moscow Monday. There were no immediate reports of injuries or casualties. (Maxim Shipenkov/European Pressphoto Agency)

KIDS BEING KIDS
KIDS BEING KIDS: Schoolchildren dressed as brides and grooms waited to perform during Children’s Day celebrations at a school in Amritsar, India, Monday. The day is meant to promote the welfare of children. (Narinder Nanu/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

PHILIPPINES FIRE
PHILIPPINES FIRE: A man collected scrap metal from his burnt home after a fire in Quezon City, Philippines, Monday. About 100 homes were gutted. There were no immediate reports of injuries. (Rouelle Umali/Xinhua/Zuma Press)

BOMBER KILLED
BOMBER KILLED: An Afghan soldier stood guard near the scene where security forces shot dead an alleged would-be bomber in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday. Regional leaders will meet at the venue later this week. (Musadeq Sadeq/Associated Press)

STREET VENDORS
STREET VENDORS: A family sold tea, pastries and cigarettes at their cart on a street in Hyderabad, India, Monday. (Noah Seelam/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)

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[Video Link, by Beschizza.]

As part of an ongoing hunt for LulzSec, the FBI raided DigitalOne's data center today. But sloppy work by agents in charge of the raid caused unrelated websites to go offline. The victims included Instapaper, and various restaurant and real estate sites belonging to Curbed Network. From the New York Times:

DigitalOne provided all necessary information to pinpoint the servers for a specific I.P. address, Mr. Ostroumow said. However, the agents took entire server racks, perhaps because they mistakenly thought that "one enclosure is = to one server," he said in an e-mail.

DigitalOne had no employees on-site when the raid took place. The data center operator, from which DigitalOne leases space, passed along the information about the raid three hours after it started with the name of the agent and a phone number to call.

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