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I'm not sure how Anthony Cerniello made this video of Danielle aging 60 years in five minutes, but it is amazing. (Thanks, Matthew!)

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A video of a new virtual reality prototype that uses both Oculus Rift and Razer Hydra technology shows how users can use their mind to move around artificial environments.

Users require an Emotiv EPOC, a device capable of mapping certain thought patterns to actions, to read their brainwaves in order to interact with the prototype through thought. Naturally, this is still in its experimental phase; While virtual reality technology is becoming affordable, the Emotiv EPOC's capabilities are "still quite primitive," and not wholly user friendly, writes developer Chris Zaharia.

"With my experience in the education industry through my startup Zookal and keen interest in neuroscience, I had a thought around how these technologies could be used together to enhance education and at the same time, see how far can we go with using cognitive control in a virtual simulation," he writes.

Zaharia hopes to explore the possibility of using virtual reality for educational purposes ranging from engineering to biology. The demo offers a look at what is currently possible using virtual reality headsets, motion tracking through Razer Hydra and cognitive control in virtual simulations.

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It’s the final lap of the 73BC Nicopolis GP and the crowd are going walnuts. After narrowly avoiding a crashed chariot in lane 4 and the threshing wheel blades of the mad Scythian in lane 6, I whip my knackered nags through an unexpected gap in the frontrunners, and find myself leading by a good pertica. There’s now only one 180-degree turn and a furlong of foam-flecked dust between me and 25,000 denarius. This is it. My team, The Ballista Boys, are about to write themselves into chariot racing history.

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Original author: 
Regine

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A discussion with artist and filmmaker Matthias Fritsch on why and how he is planning to produce a film about the story of my favourite internet meme: the Technoviking, a story that involves millions of users and that lately got him into court continue

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(author unknown)

Time once more for a look at the animal kingdom and our interactions with the countless species that share our planet. Today's photos include Iranian dog owners under pressure, a bloom of mayflies, Kim Jong-un visiting Breeding Station No. 621, animals fleeing recent fires and floods, and a dachshund receiving acupuncture therapy. These images and many others are part of this roundup of animals in the news from recent weeks, seen from the perspectives of their human observers, companions, captors, and caretakers, part of an ongoing series on animals in the news. [38 photos]

James Hyslop, a Scientific Specialist at Christie's auction house holds a complete sub-fossilised elephant bird egg on March 27, 2013 in London, England. The massive egg, from the now-extinct elephant bird sold for $101,813 at Christie's "Travel, Science and Natural History" sale, on April 24, 2013 in London. Elephant birds were wiped out several hundred years ago. The egg, laid on the island of Madagascar, is believed to date back before the 17th century. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)     

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Original author: 
Alexa Ray Corriea

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Last night, the 10th annual Games for Change conference wound to a close with two keynote speeches discussing how games affect us mentally and emotionally.

In his talk, game designer and academic Eric Zimmerman proposed that there is a problem in the way our field handles educational games and games about social change. As we move into what Zimmerman calls a "ludic century" — an era of spontaneous playfulness and playful technologies — he believes there needs to be a drastic shift in how we think about these types of games.

"We make games and integrate them into our lives," he said. "I think it's possible we're mistreating them, and not treating them with respect."

Zimmerman called attention to the fact that many research...

Continue reading…

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Original author: 
marius watz

From the Catenary Madness series (created with Toxiclibs, see code on OpenProcessing)

Workshop: Advanced Processing – Geometry and animation
Sat June 29th, Park Slope, NYC

Processing is a great tool for producing complex and compelling visuals, but computational geometry can be a challenge for many coders because of its unfamiliar logic and reliance on mathematics. In this workshop we’ll break down some of the underlying principles, making them more comprehensible and showing that we can create amazing output while relying on a set of relatively simple techniques.

Participants will learn advanced strategies for creating generative visuals and motion in 2D/3D. This will include how to describe particle systems and generating 3D mesh geometry, as well as useful techniques for code-based animation and kinetic behaviors. We will use the power of libraries like Modelbuilder and Toxiclibs, not just as convenient workhorses but as providers of useful conceptual approaches.

The workshop will culminate in the step-by-step recreation of the Catenary Madness piece shown above, featuring a dynamic mesh animated by physics simulation and shaded with vertex-by-vertex coloring. For that demo we’ll be integrating Modelbuilder and Toxiclibs to get the best of worlds.

Suitable for: Intermediate to advanced. Participants should be familiar with Processing or have previous coding experience allowing them to understand the syntax. Creating geometry means relying on vectors and simple trigonometry as building blocks, so some math is unavoidable. I recommend that participants prepare by going through Shiffman’s excellent Nature of Code chapter on vectors) and Ira Greenberg’s Processing.org tutorial on trig.

Practical information

Venue + workshop details: My apartment in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Workshops run from 10am to 5pm, with a 1 hour break for lunch (not included). Workshops have a maximum of 6 participants, keeping them nice and intimate.

Price: $180 for artists and freelancers, $250 for agency professionals. Students (incl. recent graduates) and repeat visitors enjoy a $30 discount.

Price: $180 for artists and freelancers, $250 for design professionals and institutionally affiliated academics. Students (incl. recent graduates) and repeat visitors enjoy a $30 discount. The price scale works by the honor system and there is no need to justify your decision.

Basically, if you’re looking to gainfully apply the material I teach in the commercial world or enjoy a level of financial stability not shared by independent artists like myself, please consider paying the higher price. In doing so you are supporting the basic research that is a large part of my practice, producing knowledge and tools I invariably share by teaching and publishing code. It’s still reasonable compared to most commercial training, plus you might just get your workplace to pay the bill.

Booking: To book a spot on a workshop please email info@mariuswatz.com with your name, address and cell phone # as well as the name of the workshop you’re interested in. If you’re able to pay the higher price level please indicate that in your email. You will be sent a PayPal URL where you can complete your payment.

Attendance is confirmed once payment is received. Keep in mind that there is a limited number of seats on each workshop.

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